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Author Topic: Enchanted with Alaska  (Read 10897 times)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Enchanted with Alaska
« Reply #30 on: May 23, 2012, 10:18:26 AM »

May 22, 2012      Meridian (12 miles outside Boise), Idaho

You can tell how much we enjoy a day by how many photos we take, and today we are posting 17, a record.  I am using bold type for topics so it’s easier to skim. 

The capitol (Picture 1) has the look of logs at the bottom to commemorate the pioneers. It is open Tu-F 9:30-4:30, and Sat. 9-4. It has yellow ribbons to honor their servicemen in the Mideast.   Idaho is the only state with a soldier being held as a POW in Afghanistan.  Every state has received a Liberty Bell from the U. S., and theirs is in the center of the entrance.   It is the only capitol in the U. S. heated by geothermal water.  It is atop a large, naturally occurring geothermal resource, and water is pumped from 3000’ underground.

As we entered the foyer of the basement, Dwayne came from the gift shop to greet us.  Don’t miss meeting him!  He is a fountain of information.  There are no scheduled guided tours or tours for individuals.  BE SURE TO PICK UP THEIR EXCELLENT SELF-GUIDED TOUR BOOK.

Dwayne took us to the theatre, where you could choose either a 6-minute or 30-minute film.  Guess which one I chose.  The information really helped us understand what we saw later.

There were 8 stations that gave an overview of Idaho’s government.  They were interactive, checked your understanding, and were interesting.  Don’t miss them!

Initially, Idaho was part of the Washington and Oregon territories.  When it became its own territory in 1886, the legislators met in whatever space they could fit in.

They built their first capitol by selling bonds.  It was small and somewhat primitive; it didn’t have indoor plumbing.

In 1905, they broke ground for the new capitol.  John Tourtellotte, the Capitol architect, and Hummel, the engineer who provided the structure, are much revered.  Tourtellotte had lofty ideas, and he called it “The Capitol of Light.”  He said, “The great white light of conscience must be allowed to shin and by its interior illumination make clear the path of duty.”  He wanted to create a facility that its occupants could live up to its ideals and a “People’s House that is open and welcoming to all that come.”

They used sandstone from nearby Boise hills, hired local stonecutters, and used union men and inmates from the nearby penitentiary (which I hope to visit tomorrow) to build the capitol and save money.  They.  They didn’t cut corners on the basics; they only used the finest steel.  They provided INDOOR plumbing!  The interior is flooded with natural light throughout.  Tourtellotte used light shafts, skylights, and reflective marble surfaces to capture natural sunlight and direct it to the interior.  For Tourtellotte, light exemplified an enlightened and moral state government.

When they added wings to the original building, they had to demolish a public school and the old territorial capitol.

We were lucky to come after a massive restoration  (2007-2009) with a budget of $125 million.  It only cost $123 million and was paid for before restoration began.  It also was finished 1 day early! It is purely coincidental that from the top of the eagle on the dome to the bottom of the basement is 208’ and the area code for all of Idaho is 208.  The old capitol was not in compliance with any of the safety codes, so they completely gutted it and spent 3 years making it as it was when it was first built.  At one point when they were planning, they had a budget shortfall of $6 million due to recession, and they took that from the restoration funds.   They are a balanced budget state.  They increased the cigarette tax and were able to return that $6 million the next year.  Dwayne told us that his son teaches, and 2 years ago there were Draconian, merciless cuts to education.   However, the next year when there was more money, they restored every penny.

In the restoration, they built two new 25,000 sq. foot atrium-level wings with full ceiling skylights.  This necessitated the taking down of 4 beautiful old trees that had been given them by Presidents Taft, Roosevelt, and 2 others.  Rep. Max Foley brought up saving the wood and giving it to Idahoan artists.  He carved this great Oregon Short Line Model Train (Picture 2), and he made a desk in the governor’s office.

The Preservation Committee felt it was important to restore it to its original state, and they went to all of the original quarries to get the new marble.  However, one was under water now, so they came as close as they could.  They put in 100 miles of wiring.  They restored or put in 700 doors of the same mahogany.

As we walked through the Capitol, there were large, beautiful marble-looking columns (Pictures 3 & 4) supporting the rotunda.  They are composed of scagliola—a mix of gypsum, glue, marble dust, and granite dyed to look like marble.  It was popular because polished marble was expensive and way too heavy.  It is used over steel.  There are only 6 artisans who can still do this art building form.  So, when they did the restoration, they paid them to come from Italy to do the patching.

The Great Seal of the State of Idaho (Picture 5) appears in several places—in the floor of the central rotunda, in gold leaf, and in multi-colored frames.  It is the only state seal that was designed by a woman.  “Esto perpetua” means “May it endure forever.”  The woman holding the scales represents justice, freedom, and equality.
 
The rotunda (Picture 6) supposedly has 13 large stars to represent the original colonies, but I could only see 8.   There are supposedly 43 smaller stars, representing Idaho being the 43rd state to be admitted.  The dome is actually two domes; an inner dome of wood and plaster, and an outer dome of steel and concrete.  That bump at 11:00 on the dome is a staircase for maintenance, we think.  In the center of the rotunda, you are ringed by 8 massive steel columns 60’ high clad in scagliola.  There is a gray, black, and red compass rose medallion on the floor. (Picture 7)

The Treasurer’s Office has the original vault (Pictures 8 and 9) with a large manganese steel safe inside (Picture 10)  It was made in 1905 and is still in use today.  Note the white paper—it tells them to never shut it because they cannot ever get it open again.  There is nobody in the world who knows how to work on these safes.  When they did the restoration, they put a very think layer of paint over the vault, but they had to remove it because they couldn’t close the vault.  It is such a tight fit.  The treasurer has the original roll-top desk with rocking chair from 1905 (Picture 11).

They used 9 types of marble throughout and kept the original windows, but put in double-paned glass. (Pictures 12 & 13)

On the second floor, the Governor’s suite has a ceremonial office (Picture 14).  The desk there has been used by Idaho’s governors since 1919.  Governor “Butch” Otter has personalized it with a mascot otter and license plate (Picture 15).  The governor has line-item veto power.  He can grant temporary reprieves or respites to criminals, but only until the next session of the Board of Pardons.  Idaho has never had a woman governor.

The third floor has the House (Picture 16) and Senate Chambers.  They meet from January through March.  There are 70 members (19 women, 1 minority—who is a woman), and 35 senators (9 women, 0 minorities). The houses’ interiors are identical, except the color scheme in the Senate is red, and the House is blue—both fashioned after the U. S. Capitol.  The chairs look the  most comfortable of any we’ve seen in the many capitols we’ve visited.  We were surprised to see that there were no electronic voting buttons or vote board because of the recent remodel.  This is when I miss a tour guide!  Only Nebraska has a unicameral legislature.

 In 1884, the legislature disenfranchised anyone who “engaged in or belonged to an organization that advocated polygamy.  Mormons couldn’t vote, hold office, or serve on a jury.  Even after Mormons renounced polygamy, they had no rights because in celestial marriage if a man’s wife died and he remarried, hje could then be sealed in celestial marriage with his other later wives.  In Toncray vs. Budgie (he wanted to run for a position as judge), the Supreme Court ruled the “celestial marriage applied to life after this world while laws govern this world.”

The Idaho State Supreme Court (Picture 17) has moved, and its original chamber (is now used by a budget committee.  We figured that the justices really valued their time because their clock was triple the size of those in the legislature.  Unfortunately, it’s not in the picture.  The light fixtures on the wall symbolize the “torches of justices.”  Justices are elected by the people every 6 years and have a 6-year term.

Statuary Hall has a replica of Winged Victory of Samothrace (she’s missing her head and arms), which was part of a trainload of gifts that France sent to each state as a “Thank You” for the food, medicine, fuel, and clothing America sent them following WW II.  They also had beautiful wood art from the 4 trees they felled to build the new atrium.  The George Washington Statue was carved from a single piece of pine, which is amazing because it is quite large.  It was bronzed and presented in 1869; in 1996 it was restored and covered with gold leaf.


Staying at Meridian/Boise KOA:  $101.40/3 nights with 10% KOA card discount, 50 amps, FHU, free WIFI & cable, I say wide spaces (Dean says OK width), grass w/gravel for the coach, concrete patio/walkway outside coach, patio tables, pool/spa, they escort you to site, nice people.     I would give it 5*
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Enchanted with Alaska
« Reply #31 on: May 23, 2012, 10:23:36 AM »
More pics...
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Enchanted with Alaska
« Reply #32 on: May 23, 2012, 10:28:28 AM »
The last pictures...
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Lorna

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Re: Enchanted with Alaska
« Reply #33 on: May 23, 2012, 03:32:52 PM »
Very well written and thanks for the pictures.  Looking forward to seeing it in person the end of the summer.
Lorna
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Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Enchanted with Alaska
« Reply #34 on: May 28, 2012, 01:07:53 AM »
May 23, 2012      Boise (Meridian)

We got up early to see the World Center of Birds of Prey site.  The people are dedicated and have accomplished much.  However, they were focused on giving the schoolchildren a tour, and we’ve been privileged to see so many other better sites.  Then we went down to the Snake River Birds of Prey area, which supposedly has 500 raptors nests, about half of which are currently occupied, including two golden eagles.  We spent quite a while watching, and watching, and watching……  We never saw any bird of prey, even after moving sites several times.  All we saw were a few black-and-white ducks in the distance.

I wanted to go to the Old Idaho Penitentiary State Historic Site in Boise, and it did not disappoint.  I have never valued my freedom so much.  The cells were so tiny that both inmates that they housed could not dress or undress at the same time.  The “hole” (Picture 1) took on new meaning to me, and we saw the small cement cell UNDERGROUND with two doors on top that are locked together.  They received an egg salad sandwich with tea for breakfast and an egg salad sandwich with coffee for dinner, and that is the only way they could tell the difference between day and night.  If you did something really serious, you would only get bread and water.  Instead of toilets they only had buckets.  Dean tells me that the cells were probably 6’ x 8’.  The docents told us that in the new penitentiary, the cells are the same size. 

The women had it MUCH better.  They got to go into a central social area, got to sew and make more money, and weren’t as crowded.  In this case, it was best that women weren’t considered equal.

There were interesting exhibits on prison tattoos around the world and their history.   It was illegal to give or get a tattoo in prison, and you would be put in “the hole” for doing it.  They stated that 40% of the prisoners have hepatitis.

Dean enjoyed the exhibits of the guns that were used by the guards.   He says they are military guns.  The exhibit on prisoners and riots were interesting.  The prisoners rioted in 1973 and set their mattresses on fire, which burned down the prison and caused the construction of the new prison.

170 of the 270 prisoners were allowed to work, which they welcomed.  They still work in the capitol occasionally.  They made all of the desks for the legislators in the capitol, and they put up all special exhibits, like the Christmas tree.

Staying at Meridian/Boise KOA:  $101.40/3 nights with 10% KOA card discount, 50 amps, FHU, free WIFI & cable, I say wide spaces (Dean says OK width), grass w/gravel for the coach, concrete patio/walkway outside coach, patio tables, pool/spa, they escort you to site, nice people.     I would give it 5*
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Enchanted with Alaska
« Reply #35 on: May 28, 2012, 01:38:51 AM »
May 24, 2012      Pendleton

We stopped in the town of Baker (AKA Baker City) to see the Baker Heritage Museum.  It costs $5 for seniors minus $1 for AAA card.  Small town museums don’t usually interest us, but this one was OUTSTANDING!  Volunteers have lovingly worked to make this a very special place. They had a great film about Leo Adler, who contributed money to help the city’s people—from supporting kids sports, scholarships, and the school band, to a special relationship with the police and fire departments.  He bought 5 fire engines.  He would call down to the firehouse and tell the firemen to go to the hotel; he had ordered steaks for all of them.  They would take the ambulance and go get them.  Leo enjoyed his whiskey from time to time.  When it was time to go home, the firemen would come pick him up in the ambulance and take him home and put him to bed.  If they were busy, the police would do the same.  Everyone loved him.  He left over $22 million to the city via his foundation. 

They recreated the town as it was in the late 1800’s, including the schoolroom (Picture 1).

This museum has an outstanding rock collection!  (Picture 2 shows maybe 10%).  They have a separate room with fluorescent rocks and a black light.   It’s a MUST SEE if you are interested in rocks. 

They had a large area on transportation, including cars and a very old-fashioned bike.  (Pictures 3 and 4)  They also had a lot of interesting machines.  I can’t believe that in the 1800’s they had huge apple-polishing machines and apple corers.  They had old-time cars, tools, telephones, stuffed animals, and great explanations.

Baker used to be a really ritzy place, kind of like Beverly Hills.  This museum was the natatorium (swimming/diving pool).  Leo provided a lot of the money to renovate it and turn it into this wonderful museum.

Just minutes away was the National Historic Oregon Trail interpretive Center, a MUST SEE if you are in the area. It is free if you have the Golden Age pass.  I knew that the pioneers were a hardy group, but I did not realize that 10% of them died making the trek.  The OTIC had many exquisite dioramas (Picture 5) with great explanations.  They showed an excellent 45-minute film.  You can go on a 45-minute hike and see the actual ruts carved by the pioneer wagons.  They addressed the history, geology, routes taken, problems, and economics through a variety of media—some signage, some with re-enactments on film, and also realia.  I have a new understanding and increased admiration for the sacrifices the pioneers made.  I can’t imagine leaving all of my extended family with the full knowledge that I would never see them again and risking my life and the lives of my children.

We tried to eat at the Wildhorse Casino buffet, but there was an hour wait, so we ate at the Hot Rock Café (their coffee shop).  Everything on the menu was full of carbs & grease.  I would not stop here again.   In fairness, it was a small buffet, and it was “seafood night”, and I think they may have had lobster, which caused the long wait.

I wish we had time to stop at the Tamastslikt Cultural Institute, which is right next door to the RV park and has displays about the Cayuse, Umatilla, and Walla Walla tribes.  They got rave reviews on TripAdvisor for their food, especially anything with huckleberries.   

Stayed at Wildhorse Resort Casino--$26.75, 50 amps, FHU, but they won’t let you pay at check-in.  You have to pay at checkout, which means you can’t leave until their office opens.  It worked for us, but wouldn’t always.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Enchanted with Alaska
« Reply #36 on: May 28, 2012, 11:37:30 AM »
May 25, 2012      Portland—to Salem—and back to Portland

We scurried to make it to Salem because the capitol is only open Monday-Friday.  They give tours to large groups, but individuals are offered a good booklet and self-guided tour.   This is their 3rd capitol. The other two burned.  This capitol (Picture 1) was built in 1938 and modernized about 5 years ago).  At the top of the dome is The Oregon Pioneer, which honors the spirit of Oregon’s early settlers.  It was cast in bronze and then gold leaf was put on it, and it really shines on a sunny day.  The adventuresome can climb the 121 steps up into the tower from the 4th floor of the building, and you can see a spectacular view of Salem.  Dean passed on this adventure.  I was impressed to learn the Oregon was the first state to mount solar panels on the roof of their capitol

The bronze replica of the state seal (Picture 2) is embedded in the marble floor of the rotunda.  Walls are a highly polished marble.  The capitol dome has 33 stars with Oregon’s in the center.  There are 4 large, colorful murals about events in Oregon’s history high on the rotunda walls. (Pictures 3, 4, 5, and 6).  At eye-level, they pay tribute to the pioneers, and fish and lumber industries (Pictures 7 & 8).

I especially enjoyed the sparkling Seal of the State of Oregon Mosaic made of  3250 items which a city employee collected from the city’s sewer system.  (Picture 9)  It took him 60 hours to assemble the grain, pine cones, marbles, light bulbs, keys, beach sand, coins, little toy cars, and more.  (He did sterilize everything before he assembled it.)

There were display cases throughout the first floor showing the original capitol, its successor, Oregon minerals and fossils, and laws that show they are forward-thinking.  Oregon is one of only two states, Washington being the other, that allows physician-assisted suicides.

An elegant marble staircase (Picture 10) leads to the second floor where the legislature meets.  Both houses appear very modern, with home-grown golden oak furniture in the House of Representatives, and black walnut in the Senate.  The carpet in the house features the Douglas fir tree and the lumber industry.  The Senate carpet has designs of wheat and salmon, symbolizing the agricultural and fishing industries.  Around the walls of both chambers are names of people who were important to the history of Oregon.  There are 30 Senators, who have 4-year terms and 60 Representatives who have 2-year terms.  Women represent 15/60 of the Representatives, and 9/30 of the Senate.   There were few or no ethnic minorities.  They use modern electronic vote recorders.

These legislators have the largest desks (Picture 12), and they are the only ones to have a seat for an assistant next to them.  Prisoners from the state prison in Salem made all the legislators’ office furniture—desks, coat closets, conference tables, and bookcases in their offices as well as in the chambers.

The capitol grounds are GORGEOUS!  They had huge, beautiful trees, statues, and a Liberty Bell.  One very large statue commemorated the circuit riders.   I especially enjoyed this thick shade tree called the camperdown elm (Picture 13) and the glorious,  rhododendrons blazing with color and lushness.  There is a patio area outside one of the entrances that honors tribal governments of Oregon with a semi-circle of their flags outside.  The inner circle honors all the states with their flags in the order in which they were admitted to the Union.

The governor’s suite was closed.  This a very progressive capitol, but the interior of the building lacks the majesty that we’ve felt elsewhere.  .  Many parts were like an office building, and except for the rotunda and chambers, there was an absence of symbolism.

Many would call this a “nanny state” because of their focus on fees for containers, money spent on recycling, early state support for medical care of the needy, not allowing people to pump their own gas, etc.  However, they are only 1 or 2 states with right-to-die and in many cases have led the nation with new ideas.  In the capitol, they had the first Privacy Room for nursing mothers that we have ever seen anywhere.

Staying at Fairview RV Resort -- $113.85/3 nights, FHU, 50 amps, really nice 5*, escort
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Enchanted with Alaska
« Reply #37 on: May 28, 2012, 11:44:55 AM »
More pics....
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Enchanted with Alaska
« Reply #38 on: May 28, 2012, 11:50:05 AM »
May 26, 2012      Portland

Dean announced this morning that he needed to see a doctor NOW.  We did a lot of calling and research and chose to go to Legacy Emanuel Hospital Emergency, and he was hospitalized for IV antibiotics.  He received wonderful care.  I was impressed with every aspect of the hospital, from their rapid triage, diagnosis, and treatment, to their valet service, to the delicious food at the hospital café and on Dean’s tray.  The doctors were very knowledgeable, and we were impressed that Dean was able to see a specialist on a Saturday.  Every person we met was extremely nice, caring, and considerate.

However, Dean’s situation requires surgery, and the docs here say he is good to travel for several days without further damage.  So we are turning around and heading home to the doctors who have taken great care of him in the past and the support of family. 

Marsha and Tim Lassen came over (we were in the same park) and helped Dean break camp, gave us warm hugs and love, and a GREAT IDEA.  Hopefully, we will only have to be home for a few weeks, and then we will do the trip they did to Glacier when Tim had his heart attack.  Glacier has been on our bucket list for over 3 years, and we are never there at the right time.  We had hoped to hit it coming home from this Alaska trip, but now it can be a destination.  This changes our focus from the yucky present to the happiness of the future!

So this concludes our Alaska 2012 trip.  But Alaska will still be there in 2013!  Hopefully, we can go next year.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Tom and Margi

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Re: Enchanted with Alaska
« Reply #39 on: May 28, 2012, 12:13:03 PM »
I'm so sorry to hear your trip was rerouted (to say the least!) by Dean's medical emergency.  However, how fortunate that this happened in Portland rather than somewhere in the boonies further north.  Please tell Dean we'll be thinking of him and praying for a satisfactory outcome.
 
Thanks again for your wonderful descriptions of the places you visit.  I'm reminded once again of what a superb teacher you must have been.  Lucky students!
 
Margi

Marsha/CA

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Re: Enchanted with Alaska
« Reply #40 on: May 28, 2012, 12:51:27 PM »
Monday, May 28

Linda and Dean, we were sad to say goodbye to you both, but know you will be in good hands at home.  You always feel better with your own doctors. Thanks again for handing over your coupon books.....we owe you a dinner or two.  Since I had forgotten all about getting the books, it was special that you gave them to us.  I've been going through them and wow, what savings!!

After we left you, we walked back up to our coach and immediately noticed our rear jack had leaked hydraulic fluid....not a lot....but a leak.  It's like it dribbled out, but then didn't leak any further.  Tim didn't want to take a chance and have to deal with it in the back wilderness of Alaska, so we located an authorized HWH mobile guy who is coming out this afternoon (Monday) to see what is going on.  We are hoping it's a small thing.....but it could be a big thing....so we'll see.

Safe travels!  Let us know when you get home.

Marsha~
2017 Heartland Mallard IDM231 Travel Trailer....Small but mighty.

Wendy

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Re: Enchanted with Alaska
« Reply #41 on: May 28, 2012, 01:40:52 PM »
Sorry to hear about your change in travel plans but glad that Tim and Marsha were there to help (isn't Framily wonderful?). The Glacier trip sounds like a wonderful alternate plan. You can even duck up into Canada to get your "foreign" fix :) Perhaps you could even go home via Cortez for the trip you missed the last time?
 
Wendy
Wendy, Mike, and Gordon
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Betty Brewer

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Re: Enchanted with Alaska
« Reply #42 on: May 28, 2012, 05:06:12 PM »
Wow, what an abrupt ending to a well planned  venture.  I'm sorry you will miss it but am reminded about your very good attitude that seems to make  lemonade out of lemons whenever needed.  Hope Dean recovers quickly so that you can be on the road again. 

Glacier seems like a fine substitute for a  delayed Alaska trip.

BB
Betty Brewer

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ArdraF

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Re: Enchanted with Alaska
« Reply #43 on: May 28, 2012, 05:34:44 PM »
Well, isn't that the pits!  I'm glad Dean went to see the doctor and got a diagnosis.  Really happy to hear it's okay to drive home and be taken care of there.  We both send good wishes for a successful surgery and a speedy recovery so you can implement Plan B which sounds great.  We enjoyed the first leg of your Alaska trip and will look forward to next year's log.  Have a safe trip home!

ArdraF and JerryF
ArdraF
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Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Enchanted with Alaska
« Reply #44 on: May 31, 2012, 02:27:36 AM »
Monday, May 28

 You always feel better with your own doctors. Thanks again for handing over your coupon books.....we owe you a dinner or two.  Since I had forgotten all about getting the books, it was special that you gave them to us.  I've been going through them and wow, what savings!!

After we left you, we walked back up to our coach and immediately noticed our rear jack had leaked hydraulic fluid....not a lot....but a leak.  It's like it dribbled out, but then didn't leak any further.  Tim didn't want to take a chance and have to deal with it in the back wilderness of Alaska, so we located an authorized HWH mobile guy who is coming out this afternoon (Monday) to see what is going on.  We are hoping it's a small thing.....but it could be a big thing....so we'll see.
  Let us know when you get home.


Marsha~

Thanks so much for everyone's wishes and prayers.  They worked! (Hopefully.)  We have nothing but great things to say about Legacy Emanuel Hospital in Portland.  They were fabulous in every way.   However, they told us Dean had a bone infection, and the surgery was frightening.  They got Dean started with lots of IVs of antibiotics, and gave him prescriptions for more to take orally as we came home.

When we got home this afternoon, we went to our wonderful Dr. Bell, a podiatric surgeon who has saved Dean's toes and feet I believe 3 times before--once after Dean flew home from West Virginia, leaving me with a Jeep and a 20-year-old cat to jockey across the US.  It turned out to be a real adventure!  That time was also a bone infection, and the Eastern docs had nothing but scary solutions.  Dr. Bell went to work, and it took a long while, but he totally cured Dean without ever hospitalizing him.  We are hoping he can work his miracles again this time.  I feel such gratitude to him and his positive attitude.

Marsha, I'm glad you looked through the books.  I forgot to tell you that they start in CANADA.  Because they said "Alaska" on the front, I didn't think to look through them, and there were places we had stopped and paid full price for things that were in the book.  I kept a record, but I'm doing this from recall--I think they saved us between $600-$900.  The big items were the marine cruises--I think we took them all except the 100 glaciers in Whittier, which was jammed with tour busses of cruise people.

We'll be journeying with you in your log.  You are so right to have your rig in top shape.  Get anything that's wrong fixed in the Lower 48.  You do not want to break down in Canada.  What a nightmare it was for us!

For everyone else besides Marsha who wrote--Thanks for all your support, and I'll answer you, but I have to get to sleep tonight.  It's been a long, wonderful busy day, and it's 12:30 a.m.  I volunteer in my daughter's classroom tomorrow with 25 8-year-olds, and you can't do that on short sleep.

Dr. Bell feels optimistic that we can save Dean's toe, and we are following his instructions to the letter.  He leaves the office at noon on Wednesday to go to a Wound Care Clinic, but he came all the way back (half-hour drive) to see Dean at 4:00.  I couldn't believe that any doctor would do that!  We aren't out of the woods, but there is a lot of hope.

Fondly,
A Very Relieved Linda
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Wendy

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Re: Enchanted with Alaska
« Reply #45 on: May 31, 2012, 10:13:07 AM »
We're sending prayers and good vibes Dean's way. Be sure you get some rest, too !
 
Wendy
Wendy, Mike, and Gordon
~We can't be lost because we don't care where we're going~
Here's where we are http://map.datastormusers.com/user2.cfm?user=2276
2015 Allegro Ooen Road
1973 Sunshine Yellow VW Bug

Betty Brewer

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  • Posts: 4587
Re: Enchanted with Alaska
« Reply #46 on: May 31, 2012, 11:16:30 AM »
Whew!  keep us posted.  I'm glad Dean is a good patient and follows  DR orders. 

Betty Brewer

see where we are

roadlife

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Re: Enchanted with Alaska
« Reply #47 on: June 01, 2012, 07:05:20 AM »
Dang.  Sorry to hear about the postponed trip.  But it is good to get things taken care of at home with your own trusted doctor.  Sending well-wishes, and can't wait to read about your upcoming trip to Glacier.
Road Life

currently in Alaska
http://ourroadlife.blogspot.com

2003 Allegro Bus 2 slides
2008 Ford Escape Toad (manual)
Boomer (Brittany) and Shasta (Aussie)
Chuck & Anna

ArdraF

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Re: Enchanted with Alaska
« Reply #48 on: June 02, 2012, 11:07:23 PM »
All fingers and all toes crossed and lots of cyber wishes for Dean!

ArdraF and JerryF
ArdraF
:D :D

 

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