EPDM Coatings
rvupgradestore.com Composet Products PO Box Zone
Over The Network Custom Yacht Interiors

Author Topic: Fiver hitch placement in the truck  (Read 2783 times)

spatengal

  • Guest
Fiver hitch placement in the truck
« on: March 29, 2005, 11:22:17 AM »
Good Morning
I am changing trucks and putting my Firehawk II in a 2000 Dodge 4X4 3500 Dually. I know that the placement of the hitch is very important and that 1" can make a difference. Does anyone have the information on measurements for a fiver hitch
Thanks
Pam

Chet18013

  • ---
  • Posts: 1741
Re: Fiver hitch placement in the truck
« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2005, 08:02:23 AM »
Good Morning
I am changing trucks and putting my Firehawk II in a 2000 Dodge 4X4 3500 Dually. I know that the placement of the hitch is very important and that 1" can make a difference. Does anyone have the information on measurements for a fiver hitch
Thanks
Pam

You might want to consider a new hitch that will give you some flexability. See:

http://www.reesehitch.com/fithwheel_Signature%20Series.html

Chet
Chet18013
Full time in a 45' '04 Monaco Signature
towing a 2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee diesel

Gary RV_Wizard

  • Forum Staff
  • ---
  • *
  • Posts: 60387
  • RVer Emeritus
Re: Fiver hitch placement in the truck
« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2005, 12:01:10 PM »
The slot in the hitch where the trailer king pin latches is usually placed about 6 inches ahead of the rear axle and on the truck's centerline. There is somesmall  latitude in fore/aft placement. Further forward helps shift weight to the front axle and makes the trailer more easily maneuverable when backing but also makes the trailer "lag" (cut the corner) a bit more when turning in the forward direction. Closer to the truck's rear axle makes the that axle carry more weight and requires that you turn the truck steering wheel more radically when backing.

In any case, measure the distance between the hitch location and the back of the cab and then try to figure out if the trailer will hit the cab in a turn.  Essentially you want 1/2 the width of the trailer plus an inch, but a couplel factors complicate how this is determined.  The king pin may be forward from the front of the trailer (an extended pin box) or be behind the front surface or the trailer may have rounded corners. All these change the geomtery of where the front corners go in a turn.  However, it is not necessary to allow clearance for a full 90 degree turn but be sure to remember when backing up so that you do not accidentally damage cab and trailer.  (There is almost no situation going forward where you would ever get at a 90 degree angle.)
Gary
--------------
Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

 

Hosted by Over The Network