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Author Topic: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012  (Read 37199 times)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #120 on: September 30, 2012, 09:15:11 AM »
Computer has gone schizophrenic.  May be gone awhile. 
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Betty Brewer

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #121 on: September 30, 2012, 10:56:29 AM »
I received a very garbled misspelled message from Linda indicating her computer was adding and subtracting letters.  When she can contact Apple she will be back. 
Leave it to Linda to find a way to keep us posted!
Betty Brewer

see where we are

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #122 on: October 02, 2012, 08:39:58 AM »
I received a very garbled misspelled message from Linda indicating her computer was adding and subtracting letters.  When she can contact Apple she will be back. 
Leave it to Linda to find a way to keep us posted!

We thought we had it solved, and I was jumping for joy.  However, I just discovered that it is back, but in a milder form that I may be able to live with.  Dean worked many hours checking settings, and he decided that the only solution was to drive back to Madison, a 422-round trip, to get to an Apple Store genius.  I called yesterday morning to make an appointment, and no one answered the Apple Store phone.  So, I called technical support.  The tech said that he had 6 cases just like ours yesterday.  For the first time ever, Apple was infected with a malware--it's called "Flashback".  I did not pass it on to anyone because I didn't send any file folders from my computer.  However, it may have captured our personal info, but probably (hopefully) not.  I have contacted banks and credit cards, as a precaution.

We virus-checked all 890,000 files on our 6-year-old computer, which took all day yesterday.  We'll work more today.

How did we get it?  We have the best virus protection available, and we are very conscientious about immediately updating.  However, it only works when it is turned on.   When Dean was having trouble getting his e-mail from the Cloud at the beginning of the trip, he was trying different  settings, and he turned off the anti-virus.  AND, HE FORGOT TO TURN IT BACK ON!  A big OOPS!
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #123 on: October 02, 2012, 09:15:24 AM »
Sept. 28      Day 42      Green Bay, Wisconsin

The Door County Peninsula is bounded on the west by Green Bay and on the east by Lake Michigan.  There are many state parks and great hiking.  It is a really pretty area.

Our first stop was The Ridges Sanctuary.  It sounded really interesting.  It is the home to 25 of the 45 species of endangered orchids (we saw none, even though the naturalist told me we would).  The naturalist told me that even with the cold weather we would see some of the hundreds of species of native wildflowers (we saw none).  It supposedly has 30 crescent-shaped ridges that mark the shoreline changes over the last 1200 years.  Lake Michigan extended a mile further inland than it does today.  Sand was deposited during the last advance of glaciers into Wisconsin, and that sand was carried by currents along the Lake Michigan shoreline into Baileys Harbor, then settled out of the slow moving water.  That sand was pushed into ridges by the tides and when lake levels have dropped, the ridge becomes exposed and is capped with wind-blown sand.  Then plants grow.

Admission was $5 each, and the people in the gift shop were very nice.  The trails were rigorous and really beat me up, only to be stopped near the end by planks that were too narrow.  On the way back to the parking lot, we decided to take a different trail which was supposedly also good for me, and when we were within sight of the parking lot, we encountered a non-accessible portion.  So, we had to backtrack.  I was really sore from all the sloped areas, tree roots, and what Dean called my “deathgrip”.   The one thing we did get to see was the only conifer which changes color.  It changes from green to an orange-brown.  This is a private place, and I think they just wanted our money and color-coated the truth in answering my questions regarding accessability.. 

We headed for the White Gull Inn in Fish Creek, which I had already heard about and a sanctuary volunteer had recommended.  She said that they did the premier “fish boil”.  Once we arrived there, we tried to order the fish boil for lunch.  We learned that it is only done in the evenings 4 days a week and requires a reservation.  They were booked solid, but they recommended Pelletier and the Old Post Office Restaurant, who also do fish boils.  The only opening at Pelletier were for the 8:15 serving, but The Old Post Office was able to get us in for the 5:15 boil.  Since we would be having an early dinner, we split a wonderful tuna melt at The White Gull.  They served it on separate plates with a scoop of delicious potato salad.  I would highly recommend The White Gull.  It has a lot of charm, antiques, great service, and they were helpful in getting us to a fish boil.

We then drove to the nearby Peninsula State Park.  Admission was $5 for 1 hour or $10 for all day.   There is a 9-mile road along the shoreline and a cute lighthouse.  There were so many beautiful trees in all shades of green, a few yellow and muted orange, and a very few red.   The water was calm.

As we went further north on the peninsula, there was more and more color.  Even the greens were varied and pretty.  Many or the roads had tree arches over them.   I said, "Oooh, look at that!" very often.

Everyone on the peninsula takes pride in their property, so it is a pretty drive.  There are many art galleries and cute boutique-type shops.  This whole peninsula, especially Fish Creek, is a resort area with a lot of history, and many people from the Chicago area vacation here.
 
The Old Post Office Restaurant in Ephraim was built in the late 1890’s, as a general store.  A decade later, a post office was put in at the rear.  We got there at 4:30 so we could see the preparations for the Fish Boil. 

Lake Michigan whitefish are caught fresh daily by local fishermen using nets (they won’t take bait).  The boil is cooked outdoors over an open fire, just as it was 100 years ago by the Scandinavian settlers of the Door Peninsula.   The boilmaster (chef), Earl, put in potatoes first and cooked them for about 10 minutes.  Throughout the cooking process, he told history and jokes. Then he added onions and cooked them for 10 minutes.  Last, he added cut chunks of  fresh fish. (Picture 1) Salt is the only spice used.  Fish oils rose to the surface of  the boil,   Earl announced that the boil was done by throwing a quart of turpentine on the fire, causing the fire to superheat, and the water boiled over bigtime! (Picture 2) We then went inside the restaurant and enjoyed the fish steaks, small red potatoes, white onions, homemade lemon, pumpkin, zucchini breads, and cherry pie with frozen custard ($1.75 extra).  My fish was delicious; Dean opted for the crispy, fried chicken, which he said was very good, also.

We were told by everyone that the best fish boil is at the White Gull Inn, but I can't imagine anything better than The Old Post Office.

Staying at Oneida Casino RV Parking--$15, 50 amps, no water, sewer, or dump, beautiful trees, satellite reception in Spaces 8, 9, and 10
« Last Edit: October 02, 2012, 09:17:54 AM by Dean & Linda Stock »
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Billy Bob

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #124 on: October 02, 2012, 10:07:38 AM »
We were in Door County in 2003. Thanks for the info and pictures brings back memories. Door County and the peninsula is a very scenic area. 

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #125 on: October 02, 2012, 12:32:18 PM »
Sept. 29      Day 43       Minocqua, Wisconsin

We drove 100 miles north to Wausau and encountered Wonderland--beautiful leaves everywhere.    I said, "Oooh, look at that!" very often. They are the most varied, beautiful, and abundant leaf colors I've ever seen, even on our trips to Vermont and New Hampshire.  Pictures don't begin to do them justice. (Picture 1)  We did get a picture of the only conifer that changes color (Picture 2).

We went to Wausau to see the Woodson Art Museum, so we parked our RV at the friendly Walmart.  The Woodson is a AAA gem-rated venue, and I totally agree.  Admission is free, but we left a nice donation because we were so impressed. 

When we arrived, they were just taking down the booths from a special festival, "Octo-BIRD-fest," so we went on into the museum.  They have a permanent exhibit titled "Spectacular Birds in Art," which is amazing.  The paintings look so real that they could be photographs.  One of my favorites was "Gyrfalcoln", an acrylic and watercolor done by Roger Troy Peterson. (Picture 3)  I really thought that this carved kestrel on basswood done by Todd Wohli was a bird that had been stuffed. (Picture 4) This carved feather by Chris Maynard was incredible. (Picture 5) The shadows are not in the real picture, but the reflection was a problem.  He bought the molted turkey feather from a special turkey rancher who breeds the turkeys for colored feathers.  Then he made the cutouts from the feather using surgical tools and magnifiers.

We went outside to view the statues, which were lovely.  But, the best part was the active wildlife.   Chipmunks scurried; birds chirped; woodpeckers knocked.   We saw lots of robins, jays, and other nameless birds.  I thought the woodpecker was across the street, but Dean saw him right near us and started clicking.  As he neared, the woodpecker started running around the tree, and he was faster than Dean, but Dean snapped this photo.  (Picture 6)  He never did leave.  All the birds seemed comfortable with people being around.

A volunteer docent told me that people come from all over the world to see this small-ish museum.  Even Dean enjoyed it!   (That means it has to be awesome.)

We picked up the motorhome and drove on to Minocqua.

Stayed at  Minocqua WalMart because we got here after dark and we don't like coming into parks in the dark.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #126 on: October 02, 2012, 12:35:17 PM »
Sept. 30      Day 44         Minocqua, Wisconsin

We went to the Chamber of Commerce to get maps and learn about scenic drives.  They weren't any people working there on Sunday, but the center was open so we could pick up maps.  We met some other people who were looking for information, but they already knew of a scenic drive.  We drove their 10-mile scenic drive and found vibrantly colored leaves (Picture 1).  Then we just explored, looking for more color.

Staying at Patricia Lake Campground--WONDERFUL!  Beautiful, wooded campground.  We are in Site B1, the only one with satellite reception--FHU, 50 amps ($19.50 with Passport America--What a steal!), helpful, considerate owners, can  check out at 3:00 for only $5 more
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #127 on: October 02, 2012, 12:53:43 PM »

Oct. 1         Day 45         Minocqua, Wisconsin

We started early with a visit to the Wildwood Wildlife Park, a small town zoo.  They had many pretty trees. (Picture 1) Admission was $14 each, which I thought was a little steep.  After seeing all their animals, I realized it cost a lot to feed all those critters, so I think it is fair. 

The first area, which you must go through, is a Petting Farm, and I thought, "This is going to be hokey."  A very big bunny had the "laid back" attitude of  all the animals in the petting area. (Picture 2) There were goats and pigs, too.  They had several small animals in cages here.  During the summer they have animal shows and a walk-in budgie aviary.

They had many different injured birds of prey.  They have cranes, kangaroos, a llama, camel, emus, wallabies, buffalo, zebras, turkeys, deer, including an albino, roaming and willing to be petted, reptiles, primates, a Canadian lynx, wood ducks, bobcat, snapping turtles roaming free, a bobcat, Arctic fox, porcupines, foxes, quail, tiger, woodchuck, raccoon, prairie dogs, a leopard, and a mountain lion.  I'm sure I left some out, but I wanted to show that they had a wide variety and many animals.

They had several animals I had seen before, but I had forgotten the names of the aoudad, fisher, coatimundi, cavy, tamarin, marmoset (Picture 3), duiker (which we have seen many times in San Diego),  capybara, and kinkajou. I really miss my memory!  New to us was the muntjac..

You can feed many of the animals.  They have "bear juice" you can feed the black bears.  There are pellets for the rabbits, deer, and camel.  The deer approached even though I didn't have food for him (no quarters--I've been tossing them in the console in the Jeep ever since we encountered toll roads).  (Picture 4)

 There were 2 special exhibits.  There was a beautiful pheasant area, with the most gorgeous golden pheasant,  a "knock your socks off" beautiful red-and-gold pheasant, and many more elegant pheasants.   I was amazed at the exotic chickens.  Some were ruffled; others were super fluffy; some had really pretty colors.

We felt that many of the cages were way too small, but they were immaculate.  I really close to see a beaver and black bear.  We got closer to most animals than we have ever been anywhere before.  The river otters did have a nice large area, and they delighted us with their antics.

We had lunch at Culver's, a chain we've seen often in our travels.  Dean's fish sandwich was huge and tasty, my hamburger not so much.

I have an interest in Native Americans.  We couldn't go to the previous "Indian" museum in Green Bay because they were closed for inventory, so the George W. Brown Jr. Ojibwe Museum & Cultural Center was a must.  It is a small museum, and probably wouldn't interest many people, but I learned a lot.  There were many page-long explanatory signs (some written on Ojibwa and English), which I stopped to read, so we spent a couple of hours there. (Pictures 5, 6, and 7) Most people would be done in 15-20 minutes.  Admission was $3.

We didn't make it to the Woodland Indians Art Center.

Staying at Patricia Lake Campground--WONDERFUL!  Beautiful, wooded campground.  We are in Site B1, the only one with satellite reception--FHU, 50 amps ($19.50 with Passport America--What a steal!), helpful, considerate owners, can  check out at 3:00 for only $5 more
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

therealsimpsons

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #128 on: October 02, 2012, 06:34:16 PM »
We really liked Door County. Your posts brought back memories. The Old Post Office fish boil was a treat!
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Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #129 on: October 02, 2012, 10:23:58 PM »
Oct. 2      Day 42      Baraga, Wisconsin

We lingered at Patricia Lake CG to catch up on posting, and the campground waived the overtime fee.  They are really nice people.  As we got further east on the UP, the colors intensified.  Beautiful yellows and golds abound.  Some trees are bare; others have just started to turn.  So, I think we are at the peak time.  We have seen single red maples that were brilliant.  We have also seen a few amazing bright orange trees. 

When we pulled in, we checked the weather.  They were predicting snow on Thursday on two different weather websites.  That meant we would only have 1 day to see the whole Western Upper Peninsula.  And, this is the focus of our whole trip!  But, snow and lows of 25°-28° make us nervous.  As we head for bed, they have postponed the snow and turned it into rain, and the low is 34° on Thursday, which means more time to enjoy.  I checked on snow before we came, and they never get snow before Oct. 15, or at least that was true until we visited.

I am really looking forward to seeing wonderful colors tomorrow!

The only place to stay near the sights we wanted to see is Baraga Casino.  It is on the edge of the parking lot, just like a 4th row of asphalt parking spaces.  FHU, 50 amps, only $20 per night, no trees of course, so we have great satellite reception.  We didn't go into the casino, so I can't tell you anything about it.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #130 on: October 02, 2012, 10:27:06 PM »
We really liked Door County. Your posts brought back memories. The Old Post Office fish boil was a treat!
Did you go to the same one we went to?  Did you go to any others?  Was Earl your boilmaster?  Were there any differences in your experience?  I'd love to know what the one in Fish Creek that was rated so highly by all did differently.  I just can't imagine how they could do it better, other than their dining room was prettier and full of antiques.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #131 on: October 04, 2012, 01:15:20 AM »
Oct. 3      Day 43      Baraga, Michigan

This fantastic day started with a delicious Finnish breakfast at Suomi, in Houghton.  (Picture 1)   I had pannukakku--a delicious oven-baked custard-like pancake served with warm raspberry sauce and Nisu toast (a slightly sweet bread made with evaporated milk).

We saw an amazing act of kindness there.  Our waitress went over to a booth next to our table and asked them if they knew the people who had been in the booth behind them.  They said they didn't.  She told them that the couple had paid for this couple's breakfast.  All they could figure out was that when the lady was putting on her coat, she bumped the man's head, and maybe that was her way of showing how sorry she was.  He hadn't thought it was any big deal.  We had fun talking with locals, and they gave us good information.

We drove out to the end of the Keweemau Peninsula through beautiful forest.  Some of the trees formed a tunnel over the road.  Some had shades of green, yellow, gold, and orange--all on the same tree.  There weren't many red trees, but they were brilliant.  (Pictures 2, 3, 4, and 5)

At the end of the road in Copper Harbor, we happened on Fort Wilkins State Park.  We paid $8 to park our car, and we developed a real appreciation for how hard the life was for those soldiers and their wives.  When the United States took control of the western half of the Upper Peninsula from the Ojibwa in 1842, they encouraged development of copper mines.  Fort Wilkins was built to keep law and order.  The only way to get supplies to the fort was by boat on Lake Superior.  They were not able to get supplies for 6 months each year because of ice on the lake.  I was surprised to learn that in the years 1840 to 1870, more than 50% of the people in the US Army were foreign-born.  Many did not speak English well or understand the American culture and customs.  They were very poorly paid.  After their 4 year enlistment was over, only 4% of them re-enlisted.  The story of their lives was well displayed, and we both enjoyed the history.

We stopped at Swede's Rock Shop, which turned out to be just a tourist trap with poor quality merchandise.  We drove up the little mountain on Hwy. 26 and saw beautiful panoramas of the whole valley. (Picture 6,7)  We stopped at Eagle Falls, which shows evidence of the drought they've had this past year.  (Picture 8)  They do need the rain, but I wish it would choose to come at a time when we're not here.

We dropped into Tony's Country Cafe in Laurium to buy frozen pasties that we could eat later.  The Cornish miners ate these for lunch.  Pasties are beef, onion, potatoes, rutabaga, and spices wrapped in a tasty crust.  Tony's has a great reputation, and we had brought an ice chest to keep them frozen until we could get back to the motorhome. 

We ate dinner at Bambu Asian Cuisine in Houghton because it had been recommended.  I've never had better hot-and-sour soup; Dean's won ton soup was also great.  We tried an egg roll and a spring roll.  Both were delicious, but I think we prefer the spring roll.  Dean ordered sweet-and-sour pork, which was 95% pork.  It was good, but Dean missed the veggies.  I had sesame chicken, which was wonderful.

We needed groceries and stopped at Econo.  When we pulled in a parking space, we saw this sign.   (Picture 9)  When we checked out, the cashier asked for the store's card, which would give us a discount.  Of course, we didn't have one.  So, she ran her own card.  How nice!  And, we got an additional 10% discount because today was Senior Day.  They certainly treat others with kindness here.

Staying at Baraga Casino--$20, FHU, 50-amps, on asphalt at the edge of the parking lot.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #132 on: October 04, 2012, 01:17:18 AM »
More pictures...
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

MN Cake Eater

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #133 on: October 04, 2012, 07:15:41 PM »
You just visited one of our family's favorite getaway locations.  The Houghton/Hancock area is wonderful.  I'm hoping not too many people read your wonderful report or it might be a little more crowded the next time we go to visit!   :)

Enjoy your trip east thru the U.P.!
MN Cake Eater (Paul)
2009 Winnebago Destination 39N

Paul, wife, 3 kids, 2 dogs and a boat load of patience.

Minneapolis, MN

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #134 on: October 05, 2012, 01:12:20 AM »
Oct. 4      Day 44      Baraga, Michigan

We got our day off to a great start with a return to Suomi, where I had Finnish blueberry pancakes.  They are thin, plate-sized, chock full of blueberries, and delicious.  I learned that the largest concentration of Finns in the US is in the next town over, in Hancock.  They have a university, Finlandia, which encourages students to learn more about Finnish language, culture, and customs, and to visit Finland as exchange students.  There are a large number of Finnish students who attend Finlandia.  The total enrollment is over 6,000.  There are a number of cooperative enterprises with Finnish businesses in the area, also.

We got lost looking for Houghton's Michigan Technological University Mineral Museum.  It was OK because we were treated to a delightful drive along tree-lined streets that were a riot of color.  Admission to the museum is free, but we left a generous donation because we enjoyed it so much.  It is in our top 2 of mineral museums we have visited, and we go to all of them we learn of.  The gift shop is definitely the best.  I had never seen Brazilian amethyst geode spheres before.  (Pictures 1 & 2)  I am kicking myself for not buying Picture 2, but it was over-priced.  The museum has great labeling of their quality specimens and is beautifully organized.  We especially enjoyed the video and fluorescent minerals.

We returned to Bambu for another wonderful meal.  Their lunch specials can't be beat.

As we made the 60-mile drive to Bond Falls, I called my friend, Millie, a Yooper (UPer) because she had recommended we go there.  She commanded us to stop at the gas station where you turn off the highway onto Bond Falls Drive and get fudge ripple ice cream. This area doesn't have many people, but we saw 12 people stop in to have ice cream, and no one bought gas at this gas station.  The temperature was high 40's, but they sat outside and ate their ice cream, while we sat sheltered in our car (California blood is thinner).  We remembered that Alaska has the highest per person consumption of ice cream.  What is it with cold climates and ice cream???

I took Picture 3 of Dean at the trailhead of Bond Falls with a beautiful sugar maple.  Bond Falls (Picture 4) is smaller now because of the drought, but it was worth the trip because we saw so much spectacular fall color along the way.  Even with clouds, sprinkles, and little sun, the bright colors shone through.

We skipped the Black River National Forest Scenic By-Way CR513, which  follows the winding course of the Black R, to Lake Superior, an  11-mile drive in the Ottawa Nat'l Forest  (15 miles N of Bessemer).  It was after 5:00, and would have been about 100-mile round trip, and the weather was getting worse.  We may see snow tomorrow.

Staying at Baraga Casino--$20, FHU, 50-amps, on asphalt at the edge of the parking lot.
« Last Edit: October 05, 2012, 01:16:45 AM by Dean & Linda Stock »
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

therealsimpsons

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  • Stan & Becky & Moe the Cat
Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #135 on: October 05, 2012, 09:27:13 PM »
Did you go to the same one we went to?  Did you go to any others?  Was Earl your boilmaster?  Were there any differences in your experience?  I'd love to know what the one in Fish Creek that was rated so highly by all did differently.  I just can't imagine how they could do it better, other than their dining room was prettier and full of antiques.

I remember Earl as the boilmaster. The Fish Creek boil was full so we didn't get to go to that one. Another highlight of our trip was all of the cool light houses.

Stan
05 Beaver Monterey Laguna IV
400 HP C9 Cat
06 Honda CR-V toad with Blue Ox

Jeff

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #136 on: October 05, 2012, 11:16:10 PM »
Back in the 1980's we did a family RV trip to Door County. We took the kids to a boil and when they saw the chunks of fish and potatoes decided that it was the worst meal we had ever asked them to eat!

I think they still feel that way. :D

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #137 on: October 05, 2012, 11:55:12 PM »
I remember Earl as the boilmaster. The Fish Creek boil was full so we didn't get to go to that one. Another highlight of our trip was all of the cool light houses.

Stan

Thanks, Stan.  That lighthouse does look interesting.  We haven't been stopping for lighthouses, but we're going to start checking them out.  We appreciate the suggestion.

Linda
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #138 on: October 06, 2012, 12:03:26 AM »
We took the kids to a boil and when they saw the chunks of fish and potatoes decided that it was the worst meal we had ever asked them to eat! I think they still feel that way. :D

One of many things I've learned since RVing is that happiness is found in very different life styles and food styles.  I couldn't believe that boiled meat or fish of any kind would be good, so my expectations were low.  I was pleasantly surprised when it tasted good.  Memories are impossible to change after the fact.  It's too bad your kids can't go back with a clean slate and re-experience it.  One of my most enjoyable experiences (usually) in each area is trying the local food specialties.  But, I too have had some foods that I didn't like that the locals think are wonderful, the most recent being etouffe (?spelling) in Louisiana.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #139 on: October 06, 2012, 12:21:19 AM »
Oct. 5      Day 44      Munising, Michigan

We came (140 miles); we saw (lots of pretty leaves, despite the heavy cloud cover blocking the sun); we conquered (the casino 1 mile away in Christmas).  One of the side benefits of going to the casino is gathering information about the sights from the locals.  We learned a lot from this one, which was important because we are only going to have one sunny day in the next week, Sunday.  Tomorrow, snow is predicted.

Staying at Munising Tourist Park (city owned) Campground, $30, FHU, 50 amps, on shore of Lake Superior, spacious lots, friendly host, grass or gravel site.  We got a satellite-friendly site, but it took some jockeying.  Only about 6 sites are occupied, so if it's busy, you would probably have to make choices--satellite vs. 50 amps or sewer, etc.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Roadhappy

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #140 on: October 06, 2012, 12:44:20 AM »
My DH makes etouffee with crawfish.  I use to turn my nose up but now it's one of my favorite dishes and I have to beg him to make it.   :)
Robin & Charles
2008 30' Crossroads Cruiser Fifthwheel
2008 F250 Powerstroke

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #141 on: October 06, 2012, 10:19:34 PM »
Oct. 6      Day 45      Munising, Michigan

Wind and rain started last night and continued off and on throughout the day.  Occasional flakes fell but melted before hitting the ground.  But, it is COLD, with a low of 27° tonight, and the wind makes it even colder.  It was a perfect day to clean the coach and organize our itinerary and finances.

We ate our first pasties (I was told it is said with a "short a", that my mispronunciation with a "long a" is what strippers wear), and they were very good.  Tony's gets an "A".

Staying at Munising Tourist Park (city owned) Campground, $30, FHU, 50 amps
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Tom

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #142 on: October 07, 2012, 01:11:11 PM »
Quote
(I was told it is said with a "short a", that my mispronunciation with a "long a" is what strippers wear), and they were very good.

LOL Linda. I don't know about strippers' attire, but I tell folks to pronounce it as paasties, not paysties, and to shorten the double 'a'  ;D

If you see them, try Cornish pasties; They're quite different, and my favorite. Cornish tin miners came to work in California during the gold rush, and brought the recipe with them. Our daughter lives in 49er country, and she has a standing order for Cornish pasties every time she comes to visit. Not as good as the ones my aunt in Cornwall used to make though.
« Last Edit: October 07, 2012, 01:12:59 PM by Tom »
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Tom and Margi

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #143 on: October 07, 2012, 01:19:56 PM »
Well, of course, I had to look up Cornish pasties.  Found this: http://britishfood.about.com/od/england/a/pasty.htm
 
I had never hear of swede, so had to look that up, too.  Is it just like a rutabega or something different?
 
Margi

Tom

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #144 on: October 07, 2012, 01:41:44 PM »
Thanks for the link Margi. I don't like swede (pronounced 'sweed'), so have never had that in my pasties.
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Jim Godward

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #145 on: October 07, 2012, 04:47:51 PM »
I had never hear of swede, so had to look that up, too.  Is it just like a rutabega or something different?

Try a turnip, it will be what is normally used.  Rutabegaa are also used but my grandmother would only use turnips.
Jim
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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #146 on: October 07, 2012, 11:50:08 PM »
At the north end of the Mackinac Bridge between upper and Lower Michigan, by St. Ignace, there are a number of shops selling pasties.
Bernie & Marlene Dobrin
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Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #147 on: October 08, 2012, 12:35:34 AM »
Oct. 7      Day 46      Munising, Michigan

BRRR!  As I write this, it is less than 32°, and our heater has quit.  Dean did his best, but wasn't successful, so we will huddle in blankets tonight.  I am ready to head for Arizona with the snowbirds or the Gulf with the real birds!

We started our day with the 1:00 Shipwreck Cruise on the glass-bottom boat out of Munising on the "Miss Munising."  Cost was $54 for the two of us.  We sat inside, but hearty people braved the wind and cold on the deck.  Captain Joe and his aide, Robert, were excellent.  All the windows, on the deck and under the boat, were very clean.

The first shipwreck we visited was the "Bermuda".  It was built of white oak in 1860 at a cost of $15,000.  Ships like this  headed to Chicago from Duluth, where they would unload iron ingots that were then made into steel.  Men, women, and children would come with wheelbarrows to unload the iron ore, and they would be paid $1/day.

In 1870, the Bermuda's wood hull sprung a leak, so they came into the bay at Munising (there was no town here then).  They tied the ship up to trees, and the captain and his aide went to get help, leaving 3 sailors aboard.  When they returned, the ship was gone and the trees had been uprooted. Their ship had sunk in 70 feet of water, some distance from shore, and the sailors, who were sleeping aboard, perished. (pictures 1)  Picture 2 is of the masthole.    They used wooden nails called trunnels to put the board together because iron nails would rot the wood.  To install the nail, they would drill a hole; three men held the wooden nail while one man wielding a sledgehammer, drove it in.  (Picture 3)

Later, a salvage company, using winches and straps,  towed the ship into water only 27' deep and recovered the hi-grade iron ore that was aboard.  The iron ore was worth $17,000.  In today's dollars, that is $26,000,000.  They have found a ship made of white pine that sank in 1700 and still looks good, so this ship built of white oak will be around for many, many centuries.

Lake Superior is constantly in flux.  Erosion can be a powerful force.  A man had a cabin on Grand Isle, an island off the shore of Munising, and when he returned one summer, he found it hanging out 10 feet over the water.  He put boards under it, winched it back 30', and built this seawall.  (Picture 4)  Michiganders have a tremendous will!

As Captain Joe steered toward the lighthouse, he told me that they get 180" to 240" of snow, and that he used to remove snow as his winter job.  He hated it, and he sold all his equipment last year.  They usually have snow every day from Dec. 10 to January 30, plus additional days before and after.  He needed 20 days of snow to pay his expenses, like insurance.  Last year, they only had 8 days of snow.  It was like he had a crystal ball that allowed him to get out and not have a financial disaster.

Our next site was the East Grand Channel Lighthouse.  It operated from 1809-1913.  George Pryor ran the lighthouse for a long time, and he was paid $400/year + benefits.  The benefits were 4 full cords of firewood. (Picture 5)  He and his wife raised several children here.  Talk about hardy!

We motored out to the wreck of the Helter.  The Helter was carrying 1million board feet of lumber on its deck and had a hold full of table salt.  Its 16-man crew was trying to navigate the channel in a storm, seeking shelter in the bay.  It hit a reef, and its 36-year-old wood didn't hold together.  All of the sailors were rescued by another ship.   In 1939, they decided it was a navigation hazard and a bad omen for sailors coming into the harbor.  They exploded it.  In the debris field, we were able to see the captain's bathtub and toilet.  The anchor was 4' x 8' and weighed 2500 pounds. (Picture 6)

In another area, we could see where the MMDuke hit the same reef, and they unloaded some of their iron ore over the side to lighten the load.  It's blue balls now.

When I called to make the arrangements, they told me we would be seeing Pictured Rocks.  The captain merely pointed them out from afar, and there is another tour that goes out to them.  Unfortunately, today was their last day, so we won't see the Pictured Rocks up close.

On the way back in, we saw more pretty colors (Picture 7).

We picked up chicken and beef pasties at Muldoon's, just a block away.  A few months ago, there was a competition between all the restaurants who make pasties in the UP.  Muldoon's won 1st place, so we bought chicken and beef pasties, as well as their famous gravy.

We drove into Marquette to see Presque Isle Park, which was very pretty.  We got to see North Michigan University, where several of my colleagues got their degrees.  I really liked their igloo-shaped sports arena.

Staying at Munising Tourist Park (city owned) Campground, $30, FHU, 50 amps
« Last Edit: October 08, 2012, 12:39:21 AM by Dean & Linda Stock »
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #148 on: October 08, 2012, 12:43:53 AM »
LOL Linda. I don't know about strippers' attire, but I tell folks to pronounce it as paasties, not paysties, and to shorten the double 'a'  ;D

If you see them, try Cornish pasties; They're quite different, and my favorite. Cornish tin miners came to work in California during the gold rush, and brought the recipe with them. Our daughter lives in 49er country, and she has a standing order for Cornish pasties every time she comes to visit. Not as good as the ones my aunt in Cornwall used to make though.

We were told these were Cornish pasties.  The miners here mined iron, but they came from Cornwall, and brought the pasties in their lunchpails.  Apparently, they really caught on with everyone.  I taught with several UPers, and they all LOVED pasties.  We are able to get them at a pasty shop in Los Alamitos, just minutes from my home, but I haven't ever stopped and bought any.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #149 on: October 08, 2012, 12:47:11 AM »
At the north end of the Mackinac Bridge between upper and Lower Michigan, by St. Ignace, there are a number of shops selling pasties.

AAH, but which one is best?  Each place thinks theirs is the best.  It reminds me of the clam chowder in Oregon, all of which is great, but every place wants to be THE BEST!  Thanks, though, for the tip.  We may add to our pa-a-a-a-sty collection.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

 

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