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Author Topic: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012  (Read 43816 times)

ArdraF

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #180 on: October 19, 2012, 01:03:06 PM »
Quote
I didn't realize how tied you were to Detroit or I would have asked you for more info.  If you go to the Buhl, please send me a personal e-mail at my e-mail address (ask me now if you don't have it), and I want to see your pictures.

Oh my, we haven't lived in Detroit for 50 years and our family ties are all gone now so we don't visit very often.  We went through there this summer so probably won't be back for a while, but will keep you in mind if we ever get to the Buhl Building.  You probably saw the RenCen as locals call it - the huge round glass buildings down by the river.  It's actually right at the entrance to the tunnel to Canada and the Mariner's Church is across the street that leads into the tunnel and Customs.  The downtown area looks so different now.  Mother worked at the J.L. Hudson Co. when it was a wonderful department store, now torn down.  We were driving around trying to find the plaque for the Finney Barn which was on the "underground railroad" to Canada.  That Finney was one of my g.grandfather's cousins.  The plaque used to be near Hudson's on Griswold St. but we couldn't find it.  Like you, we ran out of time!

ArdraF
ArdraF
:D :D

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #181 on: October 19, 2012, 10:51:08 PM »
Oct. 17      Day 56      Medina, Ohio (35 miles south of Cleveland)

Today is the "Pick Day" of our stay.  It's supposed to be 70 and sunny all day.  Since almost all of Cleveland's attractions are outside, I called each site and prioritized.  We got up at O'Dark O'clock (6:00 AM), which we rarely do, but I have been told there are lots of migrants (birds flying south) at the Nature Center at Shaker Lakes.  A lady named Julie volunteers and comes on M, W, F, at 7:00 AM to capture birds in netting and do banding.  I've never seen that done in person, just on TV.  It's supposed to have lots of birds and be fully handicapped-accessible.

My heart sank when Dean opened the front drape and said, "Uh-oh!  Really dark clouds out there!"  But, we hopped in the car and made the beautiful drive to the Nature Center.  It is located in a very upscale area with many beautiful trees and lush landscaping.

No Julie!  Instead there were 3 busloads of third-graders.  They went into classrooms, and we never saw them again.  Heavy mist was falling, but we went out on the paved trail, where we met a birder.  He told us that Cleveland is The Second Grayest City in the US, right behind Seattle.  The marsh area would usually be a wonderful place to see birds, but today there were just lots of song sparrows, some warblers, and 1-2 blue birds that just gave us a glimpse--he said it was a jay.  We stopped inside the Nature Center, and we were told that Julie very rarely misses, but may have stayed home because of the rain.

We pushed on to the Cleveland Botanical Garden, located at Case Western Reserve University.  They had several small  pocket gardens, but not much space.  Dean and I were disappointed, not only at the size but also the landscaping of the Japanese Garden.  Dean said, "Someone should give their horticulturist a trip to Portland to see Washington Park."  The feel of the garden was all wrong.  Our assessment was undoubtedly affected by the drizzle and gray.  We did find this unique Santa Cruz begonia. (Picture 1) 

We went inside to the warm, dry, inside conservatory houses which houses Madagascar desert and the butterfly and bird-filled Costa Rican cloud forest.  In the desert we saw a large green chameleon who doesn't change color based on his environment, but on his mood.  If he gets excited, he turns bright blue or bright red.  Of course, they don't want to upset him to demonstrate this, so they put him with another chameleon and photographed all his colors.

These red-bellied firefinches were beautifully colored. (Pictures 2 & 3) This bird had an interesting mix of colors.  She's a female or an immature, so I can't name her.  (Picture 4)
The red fody is the brightest red I've ever seen on a bird. (Picture 5)  This gold-breasted waxbill looked more bedraggled than the others, but at least he stood still for a pic.  (Picture 6)

The radiated tortoise (Picture 7) is from my dream island, Madagascar.  He is called "radiated" for the beautiful star patterns on his shell.  He has powerful claws that he uses to dig tubers for food.  Compare his appearance with his food.  (Picture 8)

As we  entered Central America, we saw this huge cacao nut from which they make cocoa butter and cocoa butter (Picture 9)  The butterflies were beautiful. (Picture 10)  The colors on the birds were brilliant, too.  (Picture 11)  I have a giant owl butterfly in a display case on my dining room wall just like Picture 12.  His eyespot scares off birds that might eat him because they think he is an owl a predator that would eat them.  Costa Rica raises these butterflies and exports them as a source of revenue, and the farmers' profits encourage them to preserve the rain forests.  Isn't Picture 13  both pretty and interesting?

(Picture 14)  Can you see the little leaves moving along this branch?  Under each one is a leaf-cutter ant.  They will go a long way for the right leaves, but they also collect fruit, flowers, grasses and stems.  They cut and carry up to one-sixth of the leaves a forest produces.  All this pruning stimulates new plant growth.  They don't eat the leaves.  They just chew them and add enzymes to make a fungus garden. (Picture 15) The queen of the colony does not tend the garden' she's too busy producing eggs.

We learned from a docent that they do a "release" of newly-emerged butterflies each day at 2:00.  We ate lunch in their garden cafe.  My soup really hit the spot. 

We got back just in time to see the wonder of learning through a child's eyes. (Picture 16)  The giant owl butterfly found my finger a comfortable resting spot (Picture 17).  Picture 18 landed right in front of Dean's camera.

This blue-beaked beauty stopped eating to pose for us. (Picture 19)  The shy red-cheeked cordon bleu waxbill is, I think, the most beautiful of all. (Picture 20)  He doesn't sit still for 2 seconds--he reminded me of some of my students!  The gold-breasted waxbill stopped eating to stare at us. (Picture 21)  The ruddy quail dove came onto the path, looked at us, and posed. (Picture 22)  Aren't his colors striking?

The Cleveland Museum of Art was right next door, it wasn't raining, and admission is FREE!  The building is as beautiful as the art inside.  The coffin of Bakenmut (Picture 23) from 976-889 BC was a magnificent painted wooden coffin made for a priest.  I admired the intricacy of the drawings.  The pharaohs of  this time weren't being buried any more in the Valley of the Kings.  The coffins and funerary goods of the rich were placed in unmarked and undecorated family tombs cut into the cliffs on the west bank of the Nile.  There is speculation that this other coffin may be the mate (Picture 24) of Bakenmut.  I was amazed that anything could be so well preserved for 3,000 years.

John James Audubon did this beautiful oil painting of "Peregrine Falcons". (Picture 25) They are eating a duck.  I'll never understand why they paint dead birds and birds in gruesome situations.

They had all kinds of  knights' armor on display.  I was glad that they protected the horses too. (Picture 26)

It was a busy day--3 different sites, but tomorrow it's supposed to storm all day, and a good chance of rain after that.  So, we made hay while the sun tried to shine briefly in the afternoon.

Staying at Willow Lake Park, Inc. $120/3 nights, (too expensive for what it is, but it's the only game in town--or even around the vicinity of town---old game of supply and demand, 50 amps & water, dump station, good WIFI, close spaces, but no one is here, so it seems spacious, the closest decent RV camp
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #182 on: October 19, 2012, 10:55:25 PM »
More pictures
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #183 on: October 19, 2012, 11:05:51 PM »
More pictures
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

ArdraF

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #184 on: October 20, 2012, 01:42:11 PM »
The weather may have been lousy, but the birds were brilliant.  Beautiful photos.

ArdraF
ArdraF
:D :D

Wendy

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #185 on: October 20, 2012, 06:55:15 PM »
Love the bird pictures. If you have time, the Rock Hall of Fame is a very cool place.
 
Wendy
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Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #186 on: October 20, 2012, 09:57:19 PM »
Oct. 18      Day 57      Medina, Ohio (35 miles south of Cleveland)

It rained all day, and we stayed home and cleaned.  I loved it.

Once again, weather has chased us out. More rain is predicted.  On my list for next time are the West Side Market, The Renaissance Center, The Zoo & Rain Forest, Malley's Chocolate Factory, Cuyahoga Valley National Park, and the Wilds in Cumberland.

Staying at Willow Lake Park, Inc. $120/3 nights, (too expensive for what it is, but it's the only game in town--33 miles, 45 minutes--or even around the vicinity of town---old game of supply and demand, 50 amps & water, dump station, good WIFI, close spaces, but no one is here, so it seems spacious, the closest decent RV camp

Oct. 19      Day 58      Galloway, Ohio (12 miles from Columbus)

We drove 140 miles through light rain, heavy rain, medium rain, and cold rain.  Dean waited until it eased up to do attach the electricity, etc., and the heavens opened up on him.  I am so ready to go south.  More rain tomorrow!

But Sunday and Monday are supposed to be sunny and 64 and 73.  I'm thinking of hibernating tomorrow and waiting it out, but our last day that was supposed to be sunny wasn't.

Staying at Alton RV Park--$36/night cash or $1 fee for credit card, 50 amps, FHU, really narrow spaces (no way could you put out an awning), great satellite reception, escort to site
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Betty Brewer

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #187 on: October 20, 2012, 10:30:24 PM »
You've kept such a busy pace, you deserve a few R&R days.  Good luck.

BB
Betty Brewer

see where we are

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #188 on: October 24, 2012, 06:31:01 PM »
Oct. 20      Day 59      Galloway, Ohio (12 miles from Columbus)

It rained all night and until noon, so we waited until the 2:00 tour of the "Statehouse."   We parked in the garage under the capitol ($2/hour), and entered into what seemed like a bunker (Picture 1) and took the elevator up to the ground floor.  The tour desk was by a beautiful marble map of the 88 counties; each county was a different color and type of marble, none of which were from Ohio.

Our guide, Thomas, was very passionate about Ohio, its history, and "The People's House."  There are no metal detectors; they don't check your bags; they have always wanted to welcome everyone.  It is a long-standing belief that government works best if people are involved.

Thomas impressed us with how important Ohio has been and continues to be in U. S. history.  The day after the debates both President Obama and Governor Romney will be here, and Paul Ryan and Romney will be here the day after that, also.  Ohio is seen as a very important swing state.  No republican has ever won the presidency without Ohio, and only 2 Democrats have--Kennedy in 1960 and Truman in 1948.  Every president of the United States since 1861 has made a visit and a speech at The Statehouse.

When it was built, the Statehouse was the largest building in the United States.  However, 5 months later, the U. S. Capitol was built, and it moved Columbus to #2.

The ground floor originally was the heart of their central steam-heating system, where they had big boilers that produced massive amounts of steam.  Cisterns on the roof caught rain, and they were the first capitol with flushing toilets.  In each of the 4 corners of the building, they put in airshafts to bring in air and light.

Now, since there are no longer boilers, they have put in many displays about how government works. (Picture 2 & 3)  This state seal was hung from the rotunda's dome from the 1920's to 1965.  In 1989 it was discovered in a closet of the men's restroom of the Senate building, and it was restored in 1996. (Picture 3).  We've heard this story repeatedly in capitols.  It seems that some conscientious history-loving person wants to preserve history and "loses" pieces, which are then discovered when government starts renovating.
 
The cornerstone for the capitol was laid on July 4, 1839.  However, shortly after that, they quit building.  State coffers were empty because of the Financial Panic of 1837.  Use of prison labor was very controversial.  There was a cholera epidemic that killed off lots of labor.  The state Constitution said that the capitol must be within 30 miles of the geographic center of the state.  The capitol is right on the fringe.  Louis Sullivan, a landowner, had donated the land for the capitol because he knew that he would be able to make tons of money from the increased value of his other land.  They didn't resume building until they had some money in 1848.  It wasn't completed until 1861.  When it was completed, it was the largest building in the USA for 5 months until the US Capitol was completed. The House wing has been used continuously since 1857.  The Senate wing has been used continuously since 1859.

They used 12 ton blocks of Columbus limestone blocks for the foundation, and a total of 55,000 tons of Columbus limestone.  They built it block-on-block-on-block.  There was no structural steel.  Everything was supported by load-bearing arches. Just look at how thick these walls were (Pictures 5 & 6).  They were even thicker than those in the missions, more than 2 feet thick.

From the lobby, if you turn left you are in the "new" Supreme Court Building, built in 1890.  If you turn right, you are in the Statehouse.  We went into the Statehouse wing and rode the elevator to the second floor.  As we entered the rotunda, we looked up at the inside dome.  There is an outside cupola over the inside dome.  There is a glass state seal in the center of the dome. (Picture 7)  The bottom of the dome is ornate (Picture 8).  The sound of peregrine falcons is broadcast several times daily from the cupola to keep penguins away.

The marble floor under the dome has 300 hand-cut stones set in patterns that get progressively larger as they get further from the center.  This signifies that the people of Ohio and their government go on forever and the infinity of possibility. (Picture 9)

Hanging on the wall is an oil painting of the Battle of Erie.  In 1813 Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry of the USN (the man standing in the center of Picture 10) destroyed the British naval fleet at the Great Lakes.  He sent the message, "We have met the enemy, and they are ours."  In the right rear is a free African man names Hannibal with his red-sleeved arm raised.  He was Perry's assistant.  18% of his men were free Africans.  A duplicate of this painting hangs in the U. S. Capitol.

Lincoln's statue (Picture 11)  is in the lobby because of the 3 important events that happened to him in Ohio. He made an important speech before the primary election, when he ran against Ohioan Samuel P. Chase for the republican nomination.  He received the news that he had won the electoral college vote when he was visiting Governor Dickinson in his governor's office.  His body lay in state here.   At the bottom of the statue, you see the inscription about Vicksburg because General U S Grant led Ohioan troops there and accepted the British surrender there.  60% of eligible men from ages 18-45 served in the Civil War.  General Sherman, an Ohioan, said when he saw Savannah, "Not even I can destroy something so beautiful."  The Statehouse was used as a shelter for soldiers embarking on their enlistment, for soldiers who were camping, and as an infirmary during the Civil War.

"Greenback" Chase lost to Abe, but he did develop an impressive resume'.  He established our current currency, and our $50,000 bill has his picture on it  He established the Federal Reserve System.  He was the first governor to have his office in the new capitol in 1857.  He was the secretary of the treasury in the Civil War.  He was a 2-time senator, a 2-time governor, and the Chief Justice of the US Supreme Court.

The painting of the "Signing of the Greenville Peace Treaty" celebrates the peace after the Battle of Fallen Timbers in 1794. The Chippewa, Miami, Wyandotte, Cherokee, Bluejackets of the Shawnee, and the Delaware had gathered together to fight this battle.  This treaty allowed for the development of the Northwestern Territories, which eventually became Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Minnesota, and Wisconsin. It allowed the Native Americans to keep the land north and west of the Greenfield line (we all know how well that worked out for them!).  On the right side of the painting is Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, William Henry Harrison when he was a military officer.  It shows Mad Anthony Wayne accepting wampum from Little Turtle.

We got to see the Senate, but not the House.  (Picture 13)  As we entered, I noted the ornate doorknobs.  Our guide told us that every doorknob and lamp in the Capitol has the state seal of Ohio.  The lights were quite striking (Picture 14).  Unfortunately, the original light fixtures, "gas-o-liers", were all trashed in the 1880's and 1890's when the put in electric lights.  However, to cover their bases, they put gas tubing in the light fixtures in case this new-fangled electricity didn't work out!  The carpet is a duplicate of the original carpet.

Senators and representatives earn $60,000 base salary plus lots of extra money for serving on committees and doing extra duties.  Their calendar is very similar to the U. S. Congress; they serve full-time.  There are 33 senators, who may serve two 4-year terms.  There are 99 members of the House, who may serve four 2-year terms.

Again, we see another statue of Lincoln (Picture 15) above the chair of the President of the Senate, who unlike most states is elected by the senators, rather than being the lieutenant governor.  Thomas says there is a lot of arm-twisting, , chit-exchanging and back-room politics involved in this process.  Lincoln gave a 2-hour speech before the primary, when he ran against Chase, to a group of 720 people.  Immediately after the election, 2 states seceded.  5 states seceded before Lincoln even got inaugurated. 

Lincoln feared for his life so much that he didn't allow his family to board the same train with him when he came to visit Governor Dennison IN FEBRUARY.  I'm going to have to find out when they changed the inauguration date because while he was meeting with the governor, a telegram came and Lincoln found out that he had won the electoral college and he was now President!  Lincoln got 0 electoral votes from the states that seceded.  There were only 4 years 2 months between his campaign speech and him being brought back here to lie in state after his assassination.

In Picture 15 we also see the national eagle and national shield.  This serves as a reminder to the senators that federal law supercedes state law.  As the guide spoke, we sat in the gallery on ORIGINAL benches.

When Nathan Kelly, the plasterer, finished the plastering of the House, the leadership told him that they couldn't afford all the frills.  After all they were a poor state, so don't put so much into decorating the Senate.  He cut back substantially, according to our guide, but he was fired because it wasn't plain enough.  Look at the ceiling! (Picture 16) I know it isn't plaster, but talk about "ornate."  The Edison light bulbs in this

By the time they built the Supreme Court wing, about 20 years after the Capitol, they had lots of money, so they spared no expense.  The light fixtures are original.  They used a lot of gold leaf to decorate.   There were originally 6 State Supreme Court members, but now there are 7.  Thomas, our guide, told us that there are now 10 chairs because they hold committee meetings here.  The Supreme Court moved out in the 1990's, and moved again 5 years ago.

The 53 rooms of the original capitol were subdivided and in-between floors added so that it ended up having 300+ rooms.  When they remodeled in 1980, they uncovered lots of great architecture and the color of the original paint.  All of the marble floors had been covered by carpet, so they had to rip it out.  The original Capitol cost $1.3 million.  The renovation cost $150 million.

Our guide felt it was vital that we understand that Ohio is the greatest state.  It has provided or is tied for the most presidents.  Thomas Edison was an Ohioan, and his painting is in a stairwell.   John D. Rockefeller was a poor man living in Cleveland when he founded Standard Oil (now BP--British Petroleum).  And, of course, they

Ohio is "First in Aviation."  The Wright Brothers had a bike shop in Akron, so he has a painting in a stairwell.   And, of course, John Glenn, an Ohioan, was the first American to circle the Earth.  And....Neil Armstrong, "One small step for man, a giant leap for mankind," even those not from Ohio!

We give each capitol a designation, and Columbus has to be "The Most Original with an Enthusiastic Tour Guide."

Staying at Alton RV Park--$36/night cash or $1 fee for credit card, 50 amps, FHU, really narrow spaces (no way could you put out an awning), great satellite reception, escort to site
« Last Edit: October 24, 2012, 06:46:11 PM by Dean & Linda Stock »
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #189 on: October 24, 2012, 06:36:38 PM »
More pictures..Originally they were in the wrong order, but I think I got it straightened out.

« Last Edit: October 24, 2012, 06:38:14 PM by Dean & Linda Stock »
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

ArdraF

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #190 on: October 24, 2012, 06:58:52 PM »
Quote
The sound of peregrine falcons is broadcast several times daily from the cupola to keep penguins away.

Penquins??  Really??  Disconnect with fingers - maybe pigeons?  ;D  Another interesting commentary, Linda.

Is anyone else having trouble seeing the last six pictures?  Mine won't enlarge and turn to a red X when I click on them.  The first ones are fine.

ArdraF
ArdraF
:D :D

Betty Brewer

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #191 on: October 24, 2012, 07:47:08 PM »

Is anyone else having trouble seeing the last six pictures?


All of mine were beautiful!

BB
Betty Brewer

see where we are

Tom and Margi

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #192 on: October 24, 2012, 09:28:34 PM »
Mine are OK, too.  Thanks once more for your efforts, Linda!
 
Margi

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #193 on: October 24, 2012, 09:48:43 PM »
Penquins??  Really??  Disconnect with fingers - maybe pigeons?  ;D  Another interesting commentary, Linda.

Is anyone else having trouble seeing the last six pictures?  Mine won't enlarge and turn to a red X when I click on them.  The first ones are fine.

ArdraF

Ardra, what can I say?  I just finished the post, and it's been a tough few days (see the next post)  Maybe my brain has arthritis, along with the rest of me.  Yes, it is pigeons.  We've had penguins, which my daughter collects, in our brains daily between a gift shop and the Columbus Zoo.  Short circuit!  But, it gave me a good laugh at myself.

I really screwed up the numbering, and I suspect you accessed it as I was correcting, which involved eliminating and putting back in to be able to get it right sequentially.  If it still isn't right, let me know what pics you can't see, and I'll put them in again.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #194 on: October 24, 2012, 09:52:59 PM »
Oct. 21      Day 60      Galloway, Ohio (12 miles from Columbus)

When we came home from seeing "Argo", a fabulous movie, the coach was freezing cold.  Every surface was like the Arctic.  I decided that I'd sleep in my coat over my nightie. We got out all our blankets, and snuggled in them.  I've never spent a more miserable night!  My legs ached; my feet were numb, and I honestly worried about frostbite.  The one time I did fall asleep, I put my hand outside the blanket and woke up in pain, unable to move my fingers because they were so cold. It took several minutes to re-establish feeling.  So, I slept in mittens!  I wouldn't get caught again!  The cold ignited arthritis all over my body.  I put my washcloth under the faucet to wash my face, and the water there was ice cold, just like the tile floor. 

We made a hot breakfast with hot tea.  Heat rises and warms the hands.  We thawed out.

At 9:00 Dean went outside to work on the AquaHot unit, and the air temp was 36!  The park manager said there was a hard freeze last night, so it probably went under 30.   Dean couldn't get the radiator cap thing off the AquaHot because there's a spring that had a lot of tension.  The only trouble light that is on says it needs fluid, but it has plenty.  Dean topped it off to no avail.  He got the number of 2 RV repair services from the RV park manager, but neither could help us.  And, or course, these things always happen on Sundays!  So AquaHot was not open.

The first thing I did when Dean went outside was find the nearest LaQuinta because I knew have good, warm rooms, and they'd take Sherlock.  I had all the details worked out when Dean came back inside.  We made a reservation, packed, and moved over to the hotel.  Thanks for the RVForumer who put us onto them a few years ago when we had a problem!

I had read "TripAdvisor" recommendations for the Franklin Park Conservatory & Botanical Gardens. The "gardens" are a city park with big trees.  It's not like the flowers are gone because of the weather.  The gardens are just non-existent.

We came back and had lunch in their wonderful cafe that the site had recommended.  They were right on that one!   I had a great pumpkin Thai salad, and Dean had a good tuna melt. 

We had high hopes for the North and South Conservatory.  Both were not impressive.  They were small, and had common plants without any labels.  The Bonsai collection & Japanese garden were highly touted, as was the beautiful glassware. I love Bonsai, and I have been going to exhibitions for 40 years.  These bonsais were anemic.  It was the poorest excuse for a bonsai collection we've ever seen.  There were only about 10, and not one was worthy of being exhibited.  What Japanese garden?  The area around the bonsais?  It was just as unattractive.  There was a small room with a 5 or 6 "OK" glass pieces.

I would not recommend this attraction to most, but I had a fabulous time and wouldn't have missed it.  They had a wonderful 2-day Ikebana Show.  I felt like a 49er discovering gold!   I have been into ikebana (Japanese flower arranging) for 40+ years.  These were beautiful and so different.  (Pictures 1 & 2)  I learned that there are 3 schools (types) of ikebana.  I have always seen Ikemobo, and this new-to-me type was primarily of the Sogetsu school. I am used to delicacy and neat.  This is much fuller and more robust.  Listening to the sensei (teacher) was very interesting.  What a rich experience!

AND, there was an artistic exhibition of recycled trash that knocked my socks off!  Unfortunately, the camera doesn't capture its intensity and beauty.  (Pictures 3, 4, & 5)  Aurora Robson heats and stretches plastic bottles into vibrant captivating works of art that I'd love to have in my home.  She uses junk mail in her acrylic paintings and collages to develop a theme.  One was about character and had words like honest, fair, aware, and cooperation.  I have long been an environmentalist, but I've never been able to take the "trash" out of  "recycled art."  I never did it with my students because I thought it would be wrong to sell something I didn't believe. It always still looks like it belongs in the recycle bin.  But this....Oh, my!

So, between the wonderful lunch, the ikebana, and the art, we had a great day!

When we got back to the hotel, I was so looking forward to a warm shower and a great night's sleep.  The only problem was that the bed was so high I couldn't get into it!  I ended up sleeping well on the couch. And I was plenty warm.

Coach is Staying at Alton RV Park--
Dean, Sherlock, and I are at the Columbus LaQuinta in W. Hillard--$89/HEATED room, WARM shower, Clean, Continental Breakfast, Microwave/Frig.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #195 on: October 24, 2012, 10:54:06 PM »
Oct. 22      Day 61      Galloway, Ohio (12 miles from Columbus)

We enjoyed sleeping in and barely made it downstairs by 9:00 for the breakfast.  It was so difficult for me to move that I was really slow.  We packed up, checked out, and headed back to the RV to call repair centers.  AquaHot gave Dean things to check; their quick fixes didn't work, and they recommended one of their dealers that's about an hour away.  Unfortunately, we can't get  an appointment until Wednesday.

We did some calling and planning for future destinations, and then headed to "The Old Deaf School" Topiary Garden.  It has a great concept, but it is a "wanna be" topiary garden.  It was begun in 1989 by the Columbus Recreation and Parks Department.  It is supposed to be a re-creation using topiaries to construct Georges Seurat's famous painting, "A Sunday Afternoon on the Ile De Le Grande Jatte" (1884-6).  (Pictures 1, 2, 3, and 4).  We took pictures of the four good topiaries.  Half of the topiaries are 50% of more bare with a large portion of piping standing out.

We went up to the top of the hill and stood near the black marker.  There is a bronze replica of the painting for comparison.  It doesn't.

The emphasis in the brochure is on the 220 trees of various types that are in the park.  It might be a worthwhile place to visit if you lived in the area and wanted to see samples of trees you were thinking of planting.  Otherwise, it's a skip it for sure.

It was very handicapped unfriendly.  I had to go "off-roading" on my scooter over hills and ruts.  The price is right--FREE.  But, parking is a pain.  Metered spaces were full, but the people weren't in the park.  We parked in the library handicapped spaces next door, even though we weren't supposed to.

We went back to the hotel, let me off, and Dean went back to the RV.  It's much easier this way.

Dean and Sherlock are at Alton RV Park--weather has turned really nice, "Indian Summer."
I am at La Quinta with a great shower that has hot water.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

ArdraF

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #196 on: October 25, 2012, 01:35:45 PM »
Linda,

First, all your photos come up today, so it must have been the timing.  They're great as usual.

Re the penquins.  It gave me a good laugh as I pictured penquins on window ledges.

Hope Dean gets the problems fixed and you can get back to being warm.

ArdraF
ArdraF
:D :D

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #197 on: October 25, 2012, 04:31:17 PM »

Hope Dean gets the problems fixed and you can get back to being warm.

ArdraF

Ardra, things are good.  Problems semi-fixed; everything's working great for now, but Dean gets to add some things to his "Honey, Do List."  Each day I'm better, and today it's 75, which is really a great healer for me.  I'm back to 75% of normal, so in another couple days I hope to be all the way back.  It was a life lesson that I have to pay attention to the thermometer and not just think all will be OK.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #198 on: October 27, 2012, 12:32:54 AM »
Holding this place in sequence for when I finish The Columbus Zoo.  It was awesome.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #199 on: October 27, 2012, 12:35:42 AM »
Oct. 24      Day 63      Galloway, Ohio (12 miles from Columbus)

I drove back to the RV park, and we went to the Aquahot-recommended repair facility an    hour east in Hebron, Ohio.  The people at RCD  were great!  They replaced the float switch and  the cap for $523 (OUCH!).   They said stir pump needs to be replaced, but would do fine for now.  They could have easily kept us there, had the necessary parts sent super-speed by FedEx, and made more money.  Instead, they were honest with us, so they get our highest recommendation for any RV repair.  They were worth waiting 3 days for!

We returned to Galloway because we had mail arriving.  We spent the rest of the day and night dealing with that shipment.

We are all at Alton RV Park tonight.

Oct. 25    Day 64      Indianapolis, IN

It was a warm, beautiful day of 75, which we thoroughly enjoyed.  We made a 4-hour drive to Indy, got set up here,  went to see "Looper", and did grocery shopping. 

Staying at Lake Haven Retreat--FHU, 50 amps, grass and gravel, level, very tight spaces, $29, 20 minutes from downtown, everything is great.  DO NOT COME INTO THIS PARK AT NIGHT!  They have boulders at each corner of their narrow turns, and they are not lit.

Oct. 26    Day 65      Indianapolis, IN

It rained all night, and was supposed to rain all day.  We planned to stay in and catch up on laundry, etc.  When it stopped at about 11:00, we decided to see an indoor attraction, as the temperature has dropped 30! 

We went to the AAA-gem-rated Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art.  Parking is beneath the museum and free with museum entry (2 Seniors/$14).  Dean forgot his camera, so I will try to make pictures with words. 

As we entered, there were huge, breath-takingly realistic paintings of the Grand Canyon.  Then came the Native American and Wild West paintings.  The quality was amazing.  The artists included many from Taos.  Even the modernistic paintings, which I usually don't like, were realistic and attractive.  My favorites were of a bison fording a river and two Native Americans in a deep, increasingly dark forest.  These paintings really lived!  They also had impressive statues, some of which were not bronze.  You could feel the speed with the way the horses' manes and the cowboys' hair flew backward.  These are definitely the best statues (including the Remingtons) and paintings I've seen on this theme.

They had a temporary "National Geographic" show of wonderful photographs.  Their theme was "The Earth."  Some had a message, like the picture of hundreds of Harley-Davidson riders crossing through the desert in infinite rows, destroying all that fragile habitat.  Others showed the Earth's beauty and interesting geographical formations, like the multi-colored pool in Yellowstone.  This was Dean's favorite section.

We had a delicious, but expensive, lunch at their cafe.  We got there 4 minutes before they closed at 2:30.  It's a good thing I didn't linger longer enjoying that bison!  They had bison burgers, but I couldn't imagine having one after feeling such admiration for the bison in the painting.

Upstairs they displayed scrimshaw using whale bone and walrus tusks.  The detail of the art was amazing.  The walrus tusks aren't large, and one carving was of a sled-dog team racing across the snow.  The artist depicted both the speed and beauty of the dogs in such a tiny space.

They had many beautiful recently-made Native American blankets, bowls, baskets, tools, clothing & feather head-dresses that were true to their heritage.  My favorite was a totem pole made by an artist whose grandfather had carved the same exact design in the 1930's.  That pole had been destroyed by the elements.  The grandson's pole used modern paint, which would last.

Most of the display pieces were less than 100 years old, and some were less than a decade old.  Everything was displayed in the best possible way.  The frames coordinated with the paintings.  The glass display cases were fingerprint-free.  There was plenty of room to stand back from large paintings to get the optimal view.  The whole museum was designed to house this collection, and they did it just right.

I loved their gift shop, too.  Dean bought me a gorgeous pair of earrings made by a Native American from ? Tribe (that's what it said on the back) for next Xmas.  I bought a small pretty wooden "secret" box with a silver horse and turquoise that will be a perfect pill box..

Everything about this museum is QUALITY and beautiful.  It is a "Must See".  I think so highly of it that I will go to it every time I'm in Indianapolis.  It is that good!

Staying at Lake Haven Retreat-
« Last Edit: October 27, 2012, 12:47:21 AM by Dean & Linda Stock »
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #200 on: October 27, 2012, 11:23:54 PM »
Oct. 23      Day 62      Galloway, Ohio (12 miles from Columbus)

I have been a fan of Jack Hanna's "Animal Adventures", so the zoo was my #1 destination in Columbus (actually Powell, Ohio).  The Columbus Zoo and Aquarium has half-price Senior Day every Tuesday @ $11/both of us.  What a nice surprise!  Parking was $7.  I had high expectations, but they far exceeded them.  The animals are happy and have good-sized enclosures.  One big aim of the zoo is education.  Most of what they taught, I knew.  But one sign did intensify my desire to encourage our government to work on global warming.  It said, "An Arctic without ice would be like a garden without soil."

We've seen many wolves, but not the Mexican wolf.    By the 1970's, all Mexican wolves had been eliminated in the U. S.  They are trying to do captive breeding so they can be reintroduced to the wild.  (Picture 1)  They released some Mexican wolves in eastern Arizona.  The gray wolf (Picture 2) has been the notorious villain (think "Little Red Riding Hood") in movies and stories.  He's actually very smart and sociable and is wary of humans.

Many states (Minnesota, Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, and Wisconsin are the ones I remember) are increasing the hunting of wolves.  The main advocates are hunters who see it as sport and ranchers whose livestock is killed by wolves.  However, there is a fund that Dean and I contribute to, that reimburses ranchers for any wolf kills.  There has never been a documented case of a human being killed by a wolf. 

We met a lovely docent, a retired special education junior high school teacher, in the aviary.  The zoo requires docents to undergo 18 months of training before they are  allowed to work.  She told us about the red-headed duck (Picture 3) who lays her eggs in nests of other ducks.  These drakes purr and meow!  The females squawk.  She helped me identify the red-breasted grosbeak (Pic. 4)

Can you see the white triangle on this bobcat's ear? (Picture 5 )  The females have that white patch so that her kittens can find her despite her camouflaged coat.  A group of bobcat kittens is a kindle.

The tufted deer (Picture 6) was new to us.  He looks like he is having a bad hair day with an unkempt tuft of hair on the top of his head.  They are found in Burma.

The red-crowned crane (Picture 7) is the second rarest crane.  They mate for life.  .Zoos are working together and sending eggs to a reserve in Russia for hatching and tracking.

The golden mantled flying fox (bats) were my favorite exhibit. (Pictures  8 & 9)  Bats are the only mammal that can truly fly.  The goldens are one of the smallest fruit bats, but they are 10 times bigger than any bats I've seen before.  The keepers were working with them, prying them off the wires and giving them shots or swabbing tears in their wings so they don't get infected.  Afterwards, they hung celery to reward them.  Their feet have 5 long toes, and the "hands" are hooks.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #201 on: October 27, 2012, 11:40:23 PM »
Oct. 23 continued


I've always associated rhinos with charging.  But, this white rhino (Picture 10) fascinated us, as he yearned to have his mouth massaged, inside and out!  He wanted to have his hide scratched and massaged.  He had a ton of personality.

It was a pleasure to see the red pandas up and about. (Picture  ) Usually they are just a sleeping ball of fur.  Today they were chasing each other and playing.  The one on the right in Picture was blockading the path for his buddy.  When the left one turned around and left, it ruined his game, so the one on the right got up and left.  Look at those claws.

The markhor (Picture 11) is the largest goat.  In Persian, Markhor means "snake eater," which is really a puzzle because he is a vegetarian.

I think the Amur tiger is the most beautiful tiger.  These cubs (Picture 13) are best buddies for now.  The adult male and 2 females had been moved our for a few hours so these guys could have outside time.  Tigers are solitary.  These cubs were removed from the mother at two weeks of age when one of the cubs wasn't thriving, and they wanted to keep the sibs together.  Unlike lions who enjoy being part of the pride, tigers only come together to mate.  The docent told us that the mother would not recognize her own cubs!

I loved the manatee exhibit.  They have 4 rescued manatees (Picture 14) who are unable to return to the wild.  We enjoyed watching them eat lettuce.

The carousel (Picture 15) brought back great childhood memories of fun with my grandfather.  It was beautiful, and original, but it was missing the rings that we used to lean out and try to get.  If we got a brass ring, we got to ride again for free.  It's probably an insurance issue.  However, I did notice that there aren't any belts to strap children in, like on our carousel at Knott's Berry Farm.  It's one of only 200 of this vintage in the US.

This is only the second time we've seen the Fishing Cat (Picture 16).  They eat fish, birds, small mammals, snakes, and snails--all of the food groups!  Doesn't he have beautiful eyes?

They have the best exhibit I've seen of nocturnal animals, including the zoo in New Zealand that prides itself on having "the best."  The light was dim, but not dark, and the animals were active. (Picture  17)  The tiger quoll, the largest marsupial carnivore, is now rare in southeastern Australia. (Picture 18 )  The feather tail glider (Picture 19 ) is the size of a mouse and flits constantly.  The exhibit was a blur of activity.  This isn't his best side, but it is the best picture of many shot.  Congratulations to Dean on getting this one!
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #202 on: October 28, 2012, 12:08:52 AM »
October 23 continued


We really enjoyed the next aviary area.  The kookaburra (Picture 20) is the largest kingfisher.  Picture 21 is a UFO.   The magpie goose (Picture 22) is regal.  I couldn't believe the docent when she told me that Picture 23 is a ruddy duck because he didn't have a blue bill.  She says these are his winter colors.  Not only do his feathers change, but also his beak.   Picture 24 is the masked ibis.  His wing feathers sparkle.  The lapwing in Picture 25 shook those yellow flaps from side to side, reminding me of a turkey.  The metallic starling (Picture 26) has piercing red eyes.

Is this kangaroo saying, "What are you looking at?" (Picture 27)

The white-handed gibbon (Picture 28) constantly explored.  He has a white frame around his black face.

We were surprised to see the small-clawed otters (Picture 29) playing on the rocks and lifting them, perhaps looking for insects.  They had a pool of water and a waterfall, but they stayed on land the whole time we were there (maybe 5 minutes).
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

ArdraF

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #203 on: October 28, 2012, 01:44:27 PM »
We saw people on TV the other night talking about the U.S. bats and how the white nose fungus is continuing its spread to the west.  I hope someone has the foresight to gather up some uninfected bats that are farther west and ship them to another continent where they can keep breeding and, hopefully, avoid getting infected.  In a few years we may need a gene pool to regenerate our bat population because the current one sure is getting decimated.

More good photos, Dean!

ArdraF
ArdraF
:D :D

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #204 on: October 30, 2012, 10:35:04 PM »
We saw people on TV the other night talking about the U.S. bats and how the white nose fungus is continuing its spread to the west.  I hope someone has the foresight to gather up some uninfected bats that are farther west and ship them to another continent where they can keep breeding and, hopefully, avoid getting infected.  In a few years we may need a gene pool to regenerate our bat population because the current one sure is getting decimated.

More good photos, Dean!

ArdraF

These zoos have an incredible world-wide network, and I'm sure they're on it.  I had heard that the situation was improving a lot, so I hope the documentary you saw was a re-run.  We saw a display somewhere on this trip at a national park, I think in Minnesota, about the problem and how when man works together, we can conquer these environmental problems.

We went into a national cave site on our last trip and they wouldn't let us enter if we were wearing the same shoes, coats, clothes.  We had to go back the next day.  Dean cleaned his camera, strap, etc. meticulously with alcohol swabs.  The problem is the private caves that don't have any safeguards  .I'll keep my eyes open for more info.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #205 on: October 30, 2012, 10:42:31 PM »

Oct. 23 continued--delayed because it didn't "take" the first 2 times

The white-handed gibbon (Picture 28) constantly explored.  He has a white frame around his black face.

We were surprised to see the small-clawed otters (Picture 29) playing on the rocks and lifting them, perhaps looking for insects.  They had a pool of water and a waterfall, but they stayed on land the whole time we were there (maybe 5 minutes).

The brown bear (Picture 30) was as curious about us as we were about him.  He came very close to the glass.  The polar bear (Picture 31) should have been out of his element on the grass.  He had a nice pool of water, but he really liked this tree.

I believe this is an East African crowned crane (Picture 32).  He has a varied diet of grass, seed, insects, invertebrates and small vertebrates, and soybeans.  His cousin, the West African crowned crane (Picture 33) seems to know that he is handsome.

We met several keepers as we toured the 3 continents.  They shared lots of information with us and were all so proud of their zoo.  They feel they are the #1 zoo.  It's hard to compare, but they do meet the basic requirement of having a moose (Picture 34).  We would say that, like cream, they are at the tiptop, along with the Doorly and San Diego Zoos. 

I am at La Quinta.  Dean and Sherlock are at Alton RV Park-
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #206 on: October 30, 2012, 11:08:34 PM »
October 29      Day 68      Springfield, IL

We travelled 210 miles from Indianapolis.  We were ready to fill our gas tank, but we weren't able to get the $3.85/gallon price advertised at Pilot.  They wanted $4.14 for "car diesel."  We tried another station and found the same thing, so we decided to try in Illinois.  The first place we stopped had the same 30 cent surcharge because we didn't have a DOT license.  But, the second place did give us the same lower price as truckers.

Staying at Springfield State Fair Campground, $20 ($5 less for being seniors), 50 amps & water, all blacktop
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #207 on: October 30, 2012, 11:20:07 PM »
October 30       Day 69      Springfield, IL

I've had abdominal pain for 4 days, and it wasn't getting better.  I've learned to be proactive and not wait for things to develop.  We went to the Express Care associated with Memorial Hospital.  They were very knowledgeable, efficient, speedy, and caring.  They wanted to do a CAT scan, but they didn't have a machine, so they sent me to the ER.  I spent about 6 hrs. there.  It turned out to be something weird that I hadn't heard of before called appendices epipliocae, painful but not serious.  The doctor prescribed Tylenol, and I'm feeling much better after the first dose.  The medical personnel were wonderful.  The doc even recommended that we go to Lincoln's New Salem, googled it on the computer, and printed it out so we would have all the info.  Amazing!

Staying at Springfield State Fair Campground, $20, 50 amps & water
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Wendy

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #208 on: October 31, 2012, 06:03:18 PM »
Hope you're doing better. Is it about time to head for home?
Wendy, Mike, and Gordon
~We can't be lost because we don't care where we're going~
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Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Northcentral US with the Stocks 2012
« Reply #209 on: October 31, 2012, 06:27:15 PM »
Hope you're doing better. Is it about time to head for home?

Thanks.  I am doing much better.  The only reason I wrote of my experience is so if anyone is visiting Springfield and needs a doctor or hospital, Memorial and their Express clinics get an A+ from me.  When people write of their repairs or other unusual places, I make notes in my "States" files on my computer so if it happens to me, I have some basis for deciding where to go. 

We'll be home by Thanksgiving (I've actually planned for 3 days earlier).  But we are going south with each move, and it should get warmer and warmer.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

 

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