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Author Topic: ST vs LT tires  (Read 24061 times)

BruceinFL

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Re: ST vs LT tires
« Reply #30 on: November 14, 2012, 08:42:29 PM »
It's confusing with the Goodyear G614 RST tires. They have an LT designation but Goodyear and tire dealers market them as trailer tires. 
Bruce A.
2004 Alpenlite Valhalla 29RK 5W
2005 Ford F-350 SRW 6.0L

cpaulsen

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Re: ST vs LT tires
« Reply #31 on: November 18, 2012, 07:55:09 AM »
ST tires are rated for trailers only. The side walls are stiff, making them unsuitable for use as steer axle tires but good for trailers. The shortcoming is that they are limited to 65 mph and many of them are of mediocre quality. There are a few good ones - Maxxis is one of te better brands.

LT can get a bit confusing because there are two conflicting uses of the LT designation. One is for High Flotation tires, which are very low pressure and used for offroad mud and sand. Never put those on any on-road vehicle.  The more common LT designation is Light Truck and is intended for pick-up trucks. They have relatively strong sidewalls but still suitable for steering. They also work fine for trailer axles and there are often a wider range of sizes and load ranges available - and at more competitive prices too. LT tires will have a minimum speed rating of 75 mph and some may be rated higher.

And Goodyear,Firestone and a lot of other makers have their tires made overseas and it just the ST tires.
2008 Ford F250/CC/SB/V-10/2018 Montana 330RL

donn

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Re: ST vs LT tires
« Reply #32 on: November 18, 2012, 09:52:15 AM »
Tires made oversees are not necessarily all bad.  Take Hankook tires as an example.  They are made in Korea and have a very good reputation for quality and durability.  Maxxis is another tire made off shore, and is probably the only ST tire made with a decent reputation.  But for the long haul with a relatively heavy trailer than came OE or is being upgraded to 16 inch wheels, a decent brand LT tire is far and away a better solution.  Michelin/BFGoodrich, Firestone among others still make their truck tires in the good old USA.

flagstaff

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Re: ST vs LT tires
« Reply #33 on: November 27, 2012, 03:25:13 PM »
Tires made oversees are not necessarily all bad.  Take Hankook tires as an example.  They are made in Korea and have a very good reputation for quality and durability.  Maxxis is another tire made off shore, and is probably the only ST tire made with a decent reputation.  But for the long haul with a relatively heavy trailer than came OE or is being upgraded to 16 inch wheels, a decent brand LT tire is far and away a better solution.  Michelin/BFGoodrich, Firestone among others still make their truck tires in the good old USA.

I have no other data to support or repute this, but Discount Tire rates Hankook not vey highly.   Maybe they get more margin on other brands?     They recommended the Marathons. 
Rick
2011 Flagstaff Classic 8528CKSS
2007 Tundra w/ airlift load leveler

Oderus420

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Re: ST vs LT tires
« Reply #34 on: March 05, 2018, 01:39:19 PM »
I'm researching this topic as well is this what I found;

ST tires aren't made for traction or steering. They have stronger sidewalls than LT but less grip and rolling resistance. They're common at 15" and 16" while LT tires are much less common at 15" than for 16".

LT tires have a lower max weight capacity than ST.

Most tires are made in China so it's not fair to say all Chinese tires are 'China bombs'.

Majority of issues related to tires are due to user error. Over or under inflated tires, driving too fast or with too much load.

Also, anecdotal evidence from 10+ years ago may no longer be valid as this world changes quickly. Lots of US branded tires are now made in China as well, including non-US brands with high quality ratings like Hankook and Toyo.
2012 Ram 2500 5.7L Crew Cab Long Box Laramie
2018 Grand Design Reflection 29RS

solarman

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Re: ST vs LT tires
« Reply #35 on: March 05, 2018, 05:43:33 PM »
Maxxis makes an ST  225/75R15 and their track record is excellent. At least one of the Maxxis models in that size has an "R" speed rating (106 mph).

Be careful of the speed rating on ST tires - many are rated for only 65 mph. You want a speed index of at least "L" (75 mph) and preferably higher (alphabetically higher letters indicate greater speed). Here is a list of the speed rating codes on the tire sidewall:
http://www.discounttire.com/dtcs/infoSpeedRating.dos

They also make a range of commercial truck tires under the UE168N Bravo label.
I have been using these for a long time and never had any issue. Also, the smaller 14 inch sizes have a higher load rating than a comparable ST. With my first toy hauler I had a gross limit of 7000 lbs, it was fitted with dual 3500lb axles and 14 in ST tires with 1760lb each ( 7040 lb total ). so basically the tires were running at near max load with no reserve. that was a very bad position to be in. I upgraded the tires to UE168N bravos and netted a 29 percent safety margin.  Every one's situation is different and this worked for me.. I'm sure we will beat this dead horse many more times to no avail..  LOL
Personally, I think the main reason for tire failure is either under inflation or overloading, I've seen both many times on my travels.

ORV 24RKS 960 Watts solar
48V LFP, 2000W inverter/charger
Ram 2500 CTD

longhaul

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Re: ST vs LT tires
« Reply #36 on: March 05, 2018, 09:43:41 PM »
It's confusing with the Goodyear G614 RST tires. They have an LT designation but Goodyear and tire dealers market them as trailer tires.
G614 RST is a LT tire but Goodyear says there intended to be used on Regional Service Trailers (RST).
...............................................................

 ST tire information we see posted here comes from ST tire makers and some dealers. Dealers just push the tire makers bilge.
  this from rv.net website by seniorGNC: actual ST vs LT tire testing per FMVSS eliminate much of the myth and half truths passed out by ST tire makers.
 http://www.rv.net/forum/index.cfm/fuseaction/thread/tid/23225970.cfm
........................................................................

 Maxxis ST8008 speed rating ?? This email from Maxxis found in the FR forums;

Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Northeast Louisiana
Posts: 11,482
Here is a copy of the email I received yesterday from Maxxis, per my dealer request. (including original spelling)

Bobby,
The spped rating on for the Maxxis M8008 ST Radial is "Q", which is 99 MPH. However, according to the Tire and Rim Association the inflation pressures and load specifications in general for all ST Radial trailer tires, regardless of the manufacturer, are designed and rated at 65 MPH. If the speed is higher than 65 MPH, the pressure and load need to be adjusted according to the following guidelines:
From 66 to 75 MPH the tire inflation pressure needs to increase 10 PSI (not to exceed the maximum PSI the tire is rated for) but requires no load adjustment.
From 76 to 85 MPH the tire inflation pressure needs to increase 10 PSI (not to exceed the maximum PSI the tire is rated for) and load should be reduced by 10%.
We hope this information is helpful. Thanks for your email and interest in Maxxis Tires.
Best Regards,
The Maxxis Support Team.....


RGP

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Re: ST vs LT tires
« Reply #37 on: March 12, 2018, 12:36:30 PM »
As you can tell from the remarks; you can research the LT tire market and find a tread pattern and performance rating you like, some TT manufacturers have done that for some of their selected models. Or, you can use what the tire industry and TT makers recommend and buy ST tires that are designed for trailer service at 65 mph. Some of the newer premium tire are rated for high speeds and their use was being touted at the last RV show we attended.

It is your choice and your money; the rim bending road hazard does not care how much you spent.  :)

Take care



   

butch50

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Re: ST vs LT tires
« Reply #38 on: March 13, 2018, 08:29:26 PM »
I just replaced my tires on my trailer. It came with Westlake ST 23580ER16 LR E  steel belted speed rating 75MPH. These tires have had some problems with blowouts so with less than 1000 miles on my trailer and off they came, The weight of the tire was 42#. Sidewalls were very weak. I was going to have the tires broke down to have metal valve stems installed and balanced so my wife said if I was thinking of changing the tires out anyway just do it now. So I did a lot of research and there has been a lot of people switching over to Sailun 23580R16 LR G ST Steel belted. These tires weigh 55# and have a stiff sidewall Speed rating 75MPH. The Sailubs have been around longer than the Goodyear Endurance tire and a good rep.

So this is the tire I'm going to try out. I don't run 75MPH usually around 60 and run TPMS to keep an eye on temps and pressure. The TPMS was the main reason for metal valve stems. I took them off the the trailer and hauled them down and had them mounted balanced with metal valves (I trust my torque more than a kid wth an air impact wrench). The tire and wheel with Westlakes felt lighter than the Sailun with just the tire.   
Butch

I try to always leave doubt to my ignorance rather than prove it

2017 Ram Mega Diesel Dually
2018 Grand Design Reflection 303RLS

longhaul

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Re: ST vs LT tires
« Reply #39 on: March 13, 2018, 09:17:05 PM »
Good choice on the S637 Sailun load G all steel ply carcass commercial grade tires. No much in common with ST E/D/C poly carcass tires.
 These tire first hit the streets in the '10 era as all regional purpose tire with a LT designation. However high tariff rates on P and L T tires were to stiff so Sailun rebranded to a ST tire to get around the tariff thing.  I have six of the LT 235/85-16 G637 on a 36' triaxle GN stock trailer since '11 and no issues at any speed at max weights all day runs. Their a winner.

RGP

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Re: ST vs LT tires
« Reply #40 on: March 22, 2018, 09:15:17 AM »
It is a very simple choice, use the ST tire that the tire industry developed specifically for trailer use. Or, figure out which of the many LT designs not recommended for trailer use, will work in your TT application.

For years some TT owner, wanted a higher performance ST tire. Now they are out their.

longhaul

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Re: ST vs LT tires
« Reply #41 on: March 22, 2018, 08:30:08 PM »
Quote
Or, figure out which of the many LT designs not recommended for trailer use, will work in your TT application.
OK I'll bit.....why would anyone want to use  one of the many LT designs not recommended for a trailer ??      And which LT tire brands/lines aren't recommended for trailer use by their mfg.
 


welmack

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Re: ST vs LT tires
« Reply #42 on: March 22, 2018, 09:24:39 PM »
My ST's  (ST205-75/14) show loaded capacity (2 axle) 7040 lbs but my trailer is only about 4400 lbs. Am I to understand that I still run them at the recommended pressure of 50 psi or is there a chart somewhere that shows lower psi ratings for lighter loads?
1999 Ford F-250 XLT, 4X4 Off Road Super Cab w/7.3 4R100 & 3.73 6084#rear axle.
2010 Aerolite Zoom 718QB TT
1998 Goldwing GL1500 trike w/trailer
Amarillo Texas

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: ST vs LT tires
« Reply #43 on: March 23, 2018, 11:15:31 AM »
The tire manufacturer surely has a load/inflation chart, though it may not be readily available. You can search for a "tire data book" for that brand, or you could buy or borrow the Tire Industry  Data Book the Tire & Rubber Manufacturers publish each year (but you might have to buy it).  As a practical matter. almost any other brands inflation table for that size & load range would work well enough. The Tire & Rubber Association standards pretty much dictate that.

However, I would not bother for an ST tire. Run it at its max load psi (50 in your case) and don't worry. There is little to be gained by trying to use a lesser pressure on that size & type of tire.
« Last Edit: March 24, 2018, 10:02:57 AM by Gary RV_Wizard »
Gary
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RGP

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Re: ST vs LT tires
« Reply #44 on: March 23, 2018, 11:44:47 AM »
As far as I know, I have never seen and advertisement by any tire company recommending the use of their LT tires for trailer service. I assume they are willing to lose sales instead.

LT's undergo rigorous testing design for the Light Truck environment. Some folks assume this means they are better suited for TT service than STs. Well Indy 500 racing tires also undergo very rigorous testing but I do not see them being recommended for light truck service. 

Admittedly in the past there were a few TT manufacturers that chose LT tire s for some of their selected models, now the GY Endurance seems to be the favorite option.

ST tires tout three notable features for TT use, a stiffer side wall, a tread patter design for lower roll rolling resistance and towing plus specialized rubber compounds developed for TT use.

How much of this is advertising hype is unknown but the fact remains that I have never seen an advertisement for LT tires that said you can use them for both Light Truck and Trailer Service. There my be such an add but they certainly are not common.

The China bomb tire debacle a decade ago did cause quite a stir in the RV circles. However, it did open the door for some of the higher speed rated premium tires now on the market. 

Safe travels
« Last Edit: March 23, 2018, 11:47:14 AM by RGP »

welmack

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Re: ST vs LT tires
« Reply #45 on: March 23, 2018, 12:43:36 PM »
Thanks Gary, that answers my question. Back in the day we just aired um up till they looked good and took off. I have seen almost all of our wonderful country, but at 77 with inoperable back problems, I may be seeing parts of it for the last time as we travel so I am quite content to amble along at 60 mph with a daily goal of only about 300-325 miles per day. If you don't enjoy it you might as well sit at home. Thanks again.
1999 Ford F-250 XLT, 4X4 Off Road Super Cab w/7.3 4R100 & 3.73 6084#rear axle.
2010 Aerolite Zoom 718QB TT
1998 Goldwing GL1500 trike w/trailer
Amarillo Texas

lone_star_dsl

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Re: ST vs LT tires
« Reply #46 on: March 23, 2018, 03:01:37 PM »
As far as I know, I have never seen and advertisement by any tire company recommending the use of their LT tires for trailer service. I assume they are willing to lose sales instead.

LT's undergo rigorous testing design for the Light Truck environment. Some folks assume this means they are better suited for TT service than STs. Well Indy 500 racing tires also undergo very rigorous testing but I do not see them being recommended for light truck service. 

Admittedly in the past there were a few TT manufacturers that chose LT tire s for some of their selected models, now the GY Endurance seems to be the favorite option.

ST tires tout three notable features for TT use, a stiffer side wall, a tread patter design for lower roll rolling resistance and towing plus specialized rubber compounds developed for TT use.

How much of this is advertising hype is unknown but the fact remains that I have never seen an advertisement for LT tires that said you can use them for both Light Truck and Trailer Service. There my be such an add but they certainly are not common.

The China bomb tire debacle a decade ago did cause quite a stir in the RV circles. However, it did open the door for some of the higher speed rated premium tires now on the market. 

Safe travels

Let me provide a retort to your argument. How many pickup trucks do you see on the side of the road with blown out tires vs. the number of trailers with blown out tires? Even with the exponentially higher number of trucks on the road compared to the number of trailers, blowouts of LT tires are very rare. It doesn't take much searching of the forums or Facebook groups to find how prevalent ST blowouts are.

I've ran LT tires on my trailers for 15 years because I was tired of blowouts of ST tires. I have ran them on trailers ranging from 3,500 lb GVW to 24,000 lb GVW with axle variations of single, tandem, tandem dual, and triple. In those 15 years, there have been two tires that have blown out, both due to road debris.

As you mentioned, the testing for LT tires is much more rigorous than ST tires. If ST tires of the current construction and at their advertised capacities were tested with the same methods as LT tires, very few of them would be on the market.

I have hundreds of thousands of miles in the real world comparing LT to ST tires and have found ST tires to be completely unreliable.

2007 KZ Sportsman 36SE3 Toy Hauler
2016 Ram 3500, CTD, Aisin, Dually
Monument, CO

kdbgoat

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Re: ST vs LT tires
« Reply #47 on: March 23, 2018, 04:40:09 PM »
There are also LT's installed on some fiver's from the factory.
I know you believe you understand what you think I said,
But I am not sure you realize what you heard is not what I meant


2016 Leprechaun 319DS

Madcow

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Re: ST vs LT tires
« Reply #48 on: March 23, 2018, 05:07:06 PM »
Let me provide a retort to your argument. How many pickup trucks do you see on the side of the road with blown out tires vs. the number of trailers with blown out tires? Even with the exponentially higher number of trucks on the road compared to the number of trailers, blowouts of LT tires are very rare. It doesn't take much searching of the forums or Facebook groups to find how prevalent ST blowouts are.

I've ran LT tires on my trailers for 15 years because I was tired of blowouts of ST tires. I have ran them on trailers ranging from 3,500 lb GVW to 24,000 lb GVW with axle variations of single, tandem, tandem dual, and triple. In those 15 years, there have been two tires that have blown out, both due to road debris.

As you mentioned, the testing for LT tires is much more rigorous than ST tires. If ST tires of the current construction and at their advertised capacities were tested with the same methods as LT tires, very few of them would be on the market.

I have hundreds of thousands of miles in the real world comparing LT to ST tires and have found ST tires to be completely unreliable.

Well, we need to be fair about this.  Most LT pickup tires don't sit all winter long like many trailer tires do.  And many times, the fault of most tires is because the user did not maintain them properly or they dry rotted.  And why anyone would pull a 5er or any other trailer down the road at 75 mph is bizarre to me.  So trailers tires are treated to hind tit when it comes to attention, and then drivers want to run them like they are trying to get pole position at Daytona.  I am surprised they don't blow up more often than they do.  Trailer tires are not on the forefront of most people's minds.  They get overlooked more than most people will admit. 

lone_star_dsl

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Re: ST vs LT tires
« Reply #49 on: March 23, 2018, 05:10:41 PM »
Well, we need to be fair about this.  Most LT pickup tires don't sit all winter long like many trailer tires do.  And many times, the fault of most tires is because the user did not maintain them properly or they dry rotted.  And why anyone would pull a 5er or any other trailer down the road at 75 mph is bizarre to me.  So trailers tires are treated to hind tit when it comes to attention, and then drivers want to run them like they are trying to get pole position at Daytona.  I am surprised they don't blow up more often than they do.  Trailer tires are not on the forefront of most people's minds.  They get overlooked more than most people will admit.

You do have some valid points. On the other hand, the LT tires that I've had on my travel trailers and fifth wheels have sat through the extended winters in Colorado and have adapted to 75 mph towing without incident.

In May of each year, I dewinterize, grease bearings, and check tire pressures. After that, we're off and running.
2007 KZ Sportsman 36SE3 Toy Hauler
2016 Ram 3500, CTD, Aisin, Dually
Monument, CO

longhaul

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Re: ST vs LT tires
« Reply #50 on: March 23, 2018, 09:55:55 PM »
One reason we don't see many LT  or P tire makers advertizing a specific LT tire line or P tire line for trailer use is most Americans wouldn't want a trailer tire on their tow vehicle.
 
 ST are popular on rv websites.
 When I was on the road pulling trailers I couldn't afford ST tires. In that type of work we were lucky to get 15k-18k miles before a ST tire came apart or those thin treads/sidewalls were gone.
 With LT on the same trailers we can run them for 50k-80k miles depending on a all steel carcass commercial grade  tire like the 16" XPS Ribs vs a poly carcass tire like the Firestone Transforce HT/others.

 LT tires....ST tires and P tires all have the same FMVSS safety std to pass per NHTSA.  That includes;
  (1) bead unseating resistance,
  (2) strength,
  (3) endurance,
  and (4) high speed performance.

  Read this summary BY SeniorGNC  to see how the ST and LT performed in these tests. http://www.rv.net/forum/index.cfm/fuseaction/thread/tid/23225970.cfm.

 

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: ST vs LT tires
« Reply #51 on: March 24, 2018, 10:25:26 AM »
An ST tire takes advantage of the restriction "for trailer axles only" to provide a physically stronger tire (greater weight capacity for a given size) than is possible when meeting the LT or P standards for traction and steerability.  That doesn't make it the only choice for trailers, but it's a very cost effective way to get a higher load capability. Along with that, the stiffer sidewalls can be beneficial in resisting the high lateral pressures that are common on trailer axles. However, LT  and P tires get similar lateral forces on the steer axle, so the difference is perhaps not so significant.

I don't see the point in trying to justify one or the other type.  If you can get an LT with an adequate load rating for your trailer axle GAWR, it works fine and you get a higher speed rating than with an ST that does the same job.  If you don't routinely drive at 65 (or more) while towing, the ST type is a fine choice. I think, though, that most owners do pull their trailers at interstate speeds at least some of the time, so the speed rating is something to be concerned about.

Whether the ST tire you buy are decent quality or not seems to me to be a separate issue. Crap tires are crap tires whether built to ST or LT specs. Yeah, a lot of buyers are looking for cheap trailer tires, so low-end ST tires abound. And an ST that can handle a given load will always be less expensive than an LT with the same load rating. That's the main reason the ST type exists. So, if low price is your primary objective, go with ST but stay within its speed constraints.
Gary
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RGP

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Re: ST vs LT tires
« Reply #52 on: March 24, 2018, 11:19:26 AM »
My intent was not to compare STs to LTs. My intent was to point out that in spite of what we think, hope, wish or opine. The fact is the tire industry recommends ST for trailer use and they do not recommend LTs for trailer service.

Nobody says you have to listen to the expert's, if you have the expertise to choose the correct LT for your application.

Also, I have not seen any credible data from the DOT or other source showing ST tire failure rates to be higher than other tire. If it is out I would like to see the failure rate of P, ST  and LT tires.

Finally, I believe the majority of  pick-up tires are the dreaded "P" tires.

In the end it is an individual choice, we all base our choices on whatever we think is best.

FastEagle

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Re: ST vs LT tires
« Reply #53 on: March 24, 2018, 04:28:59 PM »
 Over the past 12-14 years Ive written numerous posts about this subject. The more I dig into the subject, the more I learn.

The following is a verbatim quote from a NHTSA PDF file that is self describing: Light truck (LT) tire means a tire designated by its manufacturer as primarily intended for use on lightweight trucks or multipurpose passenger vehicles.

ST tire designation: ST stands for Special Trailer tire. ST tires are designed for use on trailer axle positions only. They are not designed for the load or traction requirements of a drive or steering axle. ST tires have strengthened sidewalls to prevent the tire from rolling under the rim in turns and when cornering.

So, testing those completely different designed tires would be for their performance in their designed functions. Can they safely do the job they were designed for?

Misapplications? Its often mentioned. Very difficult to explain with few words. It revolves around vehicle certification. That label that many people view in different levels of understanding. Its the vehicle manufacturer saying they have selected a tire for fitment on a vehicle that is appropriate for that particular fitment. Its minimum load capacity was set with the vehicle manufactures recommended cold inflation pressure as directed to do so by regulation. Being certified by them it becomes the minimum safety standard for that vehicle. All subsequent replacements need to have qualities and load capacity capabilities equal to the original tires.
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Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: ST vs LT tires
« Reply #54 on: March 24, 2018, 04:34:01 PM »
Quote
My intent was to point out that in spite of what we think, hope, wish or opine. The fact is the tire industry recommends ST for trailer use and they do not recommend LTs for trailer service.

I think you are reading too much into a lack of a specific recommendation for LT use on a trailer.  The tire industry tells us, and RV makers, what a tire is designed to do, what they call an "application".  They intentionally leave it up to the vehicle maker, or the tire buyer in the aftermarket, to decide if a particular tire is suitable for the vehicle and intended usage or not.  I do not believe you will find anywhere a statement that says "Only ST tires are recommended for trailers." If you ask a tire company what to put on a trailer, they will very carefully reply that ST tires are designed for trailer use, but that's not the same thing as only ST tires are usable on trailer.  Nor do they say that only LT tires can be used on light trucks, or that LT tires can only be used on trucks.  In fact, many light trucks come factory equipped with P-series tires, and many trailers come factory equipped with LT tires. This is not in violation of any tire industry guideline or warranty.
Gary
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Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

FastEagle

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Re: ST vs LT tires
« Reply #55 on: March 24, 2018, 05:10:33 PM »
They do not say that only LT tires can be used on light trucks, or that LT tires can only be used on trucks.  In fact, many light trucks come factory equipped with P-series tires, and many trailers come factory equipped with LT tires. This is not in violation of any tire industry guideline or warranty.

Very true, but, for original equipment tire fitments the vehicle manufacture has the sole responsibility for the type/design tires fitted to the vehicle. They then must certify those fitments to be appropriate. For the RV trailer industry there are no, after the sale options, unless the vehicle manufacturer identifies them.
 
The vehicle manufacturer has the authority to select any of the DOT certified highway tires for original equipment trailer fitments, even passenger tires.
 
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Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: ST vs LT tires
« Reply #56 on: March 24, 2018, 06:58:37 PM »
Quote
For the RV trailer industry there are no, after the sale options, unless the vehicle manufacturer identifies them.

Not sure what you are trying to say there. I don't know of any vehicle manufacturers  in any industry who identify aftermarket optional tires for their vehicles. At best, you can assume that a factory option tire is probably OK as an aftermarket option, but even that requires the further assumption that all the pertinent vehicle components are the same as well.

After sale options are strictly up to the vehicle owner and to some extent, the tire dealer who agrees to supply & install them.
Gary
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FastEagle

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Re: ST vs LT tires
« Reply #57 on: March 24, 2018, 11:08:31 PM »
Not sure what you are trying to say there. I don't know of any vehicle manufacturers  in any industry who identify aftermarket optional tires for their vehicles. At best, you can assume that a factory option tire is probably OK as an aftermarket option, but even that requires the further assumption that all the pertinent vehicle components are the same as well.

After sale options are strictly up to the vehicle owner and to some extent, the tire dealer who agrees to supply & install them.

Any well established retail tire establishment will have a list of replacement tires that are suitable and recommended as replacements for almost all automotive vehicles. When it comes to RV trailers they seem to be mystified.
   
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Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: ST vs LT tires
« Reply #58 on: March 25, 2018, 09:57:01 AM »
OK, I get that.   It's the tire dealer's recommendation, not the tire manufacturer or the vehicle manufacturer.  I guess most tire shops don't handle enough RVs, towable or motorhome, to develop their own lists.  Or there are too many variables to make a simple list for their semi-trained store personnel to utilize safely.

There are a few from tire makers, though, basically size substitutions they deem equivalent. For example. Goodyear says their 245/75R22.5 will replace most 235/80R22.5 applications.

https://www.goodyearrvtires.com/size-conversions.aspx
Gary
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Foto-n-T

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Re: ST vs LT tires
« Reply #59 on: March 25, 2018, 12:21:08 PM »
It's interesting to note that modern towables began being sold with adequate tires for the application about ten years ago. Prior to that we were lucky to have an adequate weight rating on stock tires just to carry "empty" weight. The truth of the matter is, most towable RV owners never come close to actually wearing out their tires. For those of us who do put enough miles on to wear them out we now have adequate choices available. I for one do run ST tires but there was a time when the LT tires were my preffered option.

By the way, if you think ST versus LT tires in the RV world is a box of snakes you ought to see what has been happening in the world of motorcycle tires in the last few years. There's actually a faction out there that call themselves "Dark Siders" who run P tires on heavy bikes like the Goldwing. It seems everyone wants to try and out think the engineer's.
Joe

2008 Victory Lane
1998 Freightliner FL50
Cody, WY when it's not covered in ice.