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Author Topic: Pop-up wiring  (Read 3425 times)

IrishBrewer

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Pop-up wiring
« on: September 01, 2006, 03:06:34 PM »
I am new to the world of pop-ups and I was curious as to the typical methods of wiring.

Say I wanted to add another 12V cabin light or a 12V water pump.  I would guess that in the case of the water pump, there should be some pre-existing wiring under the sink for such an addition - is this typically the case or am I being overly optimistic?  I've looked under the sink (but not that closely) and nothing jumped out at me.

For another cabin light, would one typically do a home run back to the inverter or are there any other common areas for junction boxes that one could tap into the power?

The only provisional junction boxes that are obvious are for an add on heater near the door or an add-on AC unit in the roof but these must be 110V.  They have blank covers on them at the moment.

Jim Dick

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Re: Pop-up wiring
« Reply #1 on: September 01, 2006, 10:32:35 PM »
I am new to the world of pop-ups and I was curious as to the typical methods of wiring.

Say I wanted to add another 12V cabin light or a 12V water pump.  I would guess that in the case of the water pump, there should be some pre-existing wiring under the sink for such an addition - is this typically the case or am I being overly optimistic?  I've looked under the sink (but not that closely) and nothing jumped out at me.

For another cabin light, would one typically do a home run back to the inverter or are there any other common areas for junction boxes that one could tap into the power?

The only provisional junction boxes that are obvious are for an add on heater near the door or an add-on AC unit in the roof but these must be 110V.  They have blank covers on them at the moment.

Cabin lighting could be added from most any 12V source. Not sure why you would want to add another water pump since one is more than sufficient. Tapping into an existing circuit for lighting should be OK as long as it doesn't exceed the limit of the fuse. On some units there are additional fuse positions for extra circuits but not on all of them.
« Last Edit: September 01, 2006, 10:34:58 PM by Jim Dick »
Jim

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IrishBrewer

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Re: Pop-up wiring
« Reply #2 on: September 02, 2006, 08:13:09 AM »
Jim,

Thanks for the reply.  I guess I was a little ambiguous about the pump. There is currently no pump (water is pumped manually into the sink at this time).   There are three cabin lights and I'm considering adding another.  I just don't know if there are any existing wire chases or conduits that I should be looking for.

There are currently two AC circuits.  Only one is being used at the moment (for the outlets and the refrigerator).  The second is reserved for heat and/or air.

Jim Dick

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Re: Pop-up wiring
« Reply #3 on: September 02, 2006, 08:24:58 AM »
Jim,

Thanks for the reply.  I guess I was a little ambiguous about the pump. There is currently no pump (water is pumped manually into the sink at this time).   There are three cabin lights and I'm considering adding another.  I just don't know if there are any existing wire chases or conduits that I should be looking for.

There are currently two AC circuits.  Only one is being used at the moment (for the outlets and the refrigerator).  The second is reserved for heat and/or air.

OK, that makes more sense. :) There may not be any wiring for the pump. Many of them are installed with an in line fuse so you can pick up power from the main battery source. You can probably pick up power at the fuse panel. The pump should be installed at the output of the tank before the city water feed.

You should have two wires running up one side of the trailer in a fabric chase. Most likely on the street side. These power the ceiling fixtures as well as a vent fan if equipped. There won't be any wire chase in the ceiling. You'll have to pick up power from the closest light and fish it through the ceiling material.

The second breaker would be for an air conditioner. Heat is normally supplied by a propane furnace which is operated from 12V.
Jim

Titusville, Florida
U.S. Navy Veteran
2000 American Dream 40' DP
2012 GMC Terrain
2006 Suzuki Boulevard C50T Motorcycle
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John From Detroit

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Re: Pop-up wiring
« Reply #4 on: September 02, 2006, 09:41:43 AM »
The one rig I added an electric pump to had no pump wireing under the sink,  I had to run back to the battery.  However since the primary wireing couduit ran along that wall... not a problem

Of course I also added a "City water" system to my popup, and later to my hard trailer (A 13 foot Scamp) the city system was nothing more than a standard faucet on a panel that set above the sink on the popup with hoses run up under the canvas.

on the Scamp it was a 1/2 inch pipe nipple, inlet on the otuside and a standard "Hose bib" type spigot on the inside, This was cold water only, the entier fresh water system in that trailer was less than an inch long with hoses disconnected.
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