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Author Topic: Fridge: How Level is "enough"?  (Read 44364 times)

Just Lou

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Re: Fridge: How Level is "enough"?
« Reply #120 on: December 16, 2013, 10:30:48 AM »
Because they are.  I fixed the message units.
LOL... I knew that, I just didn't want to point out that my hero made a typo. ;) :D
'97 Bounder 34V (F53 w/tag), '99 Honda Accord EX

Ned

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Re: Fridge: How Level is "enough"?
« Reply #121 on: December 16, 2013, 12:01:13 PM »
It was the computer that did it, honest :)
-- Ned -- Fulltimer 1997-2013
1997 Holiday Rambler Endeavor LE
2007 GMC Canyon

Just Lou

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Re: Fridge: How Level is "enough"?
« Reply #122 on: December 16, 2013, 01:32:08 PM »
It was the computer that did it, honest :)
I understand completely. :)   My keyboard develops an attitude from time to time also ;) .
'97 Bounder 34V (F53 w/tag), '99 Honda Accord EX

dirko

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Re: Fridge: How Level is "enough"?
« Reply #123 on: January 31, 2014, 06:36:39 PM »
Hi Ho:  I'm impressed with the work and thought in this thread.  Over the years I've found that enough additional data can often lead to an improved understanding of what is happening, and perhaps to a solution to a problem that was not apparent (or even thought about) when the experiment began.   So here's an additional question:  If enough historical temperature data is available can one infer anything about the current condition of a cooling unit?  Or put another way:  As the cooling unit degrades over time can a history of boiler data determine anything about the degree of deterioration?  Also, if enough data is available from similar units in similar coaches can one determine if a particular installation is at risk?
Dirk and Katie and Duke (Golden Retriever)
Coach:  2006 Tiffin Phaeton 40QDH
What else:  Private Pilot (Piper Turbo Arrow), Woodworking, Scuba
Past life:  Electronic engineer (wireless R&D)

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: Fridge: How Level is "enough"?
« Reply #124 on: January 31, 2014, 08:07:58 PM »
It seems likely, but nobody has enough data to know.  Well, maybe the fridge makers know, but they aren't telling.
Gary
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Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

Back2PA

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Re: Fridge: How Level is "enough"?
« Reply #125 on: August 24, 2015, 08:01:41 AM »
So... I did a search on the subject topic, read through all of the thread that appeared on this two year old topic, and now I still have to ask, "how level is enough?"

Working through the bugs on delivery of an '05 coach w 4 door Norcold (1200LR). Fridge seemed like it was doing very well, especially given the 105 degree temps here in AZ. Then I took it home and temporarily parked in driveway a couple days while provisioning. Driveway has what I would call moderste slope, nose probably down about 12-15". I was used to fridge problems in the RVs I had years ago (very sensitive to out of level, no cooling fan, poor cooling in high heat, etc) but thought the newer fridges were much less sensitive. I was surprised to have cooling issues.

And without a rehash of all the technicals, is this ARP thing generally considered a good thing?
Scott
2014 Montana High Country 343RL (37')
2011 F-250 SD LB 4x4, 6.2 Gas, 10K gross
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Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: Fridge: How Level is "enough"?
« Reply #126 on: August 24, 2015, 09:00:22 AM »
Probably depends on what "general" you talk to!  I happen to be a fan of ARP. It does a better job of protecting the fridge from overheat conditions, and that also results in safer operation (reduced fire risk). It can't fix an out-of-level condition, but it can and does prevent the damage caused by it.

If your 1200LR fridge is on the driver side of the coach, a nose-down attitude is the worst possible off-level condition. That's because the boiler is mounted on the right (as you face the backside) and thus on the uphill (high) side. The ammonia solution is largely, or maybe even completely, prevented from flowing back to the boiler. Cooling performance drops rapidly and boiler temperature climbs dramatically in just a few minutes. Norcold says that 3 degrees of tilt is the max side-to-side, and that's about 6" over the length of a 40 ft RV. Visually, not a lot of tilt.

The odd thing is that a moderate nose-up attitude would actually help the cooling unit a little because the refrigerant runs back to the boiler nicely.

All Norcolds and most Dometics have the boiler on the right side (looking from the rear). If the fridge in on the driver side, that makes nose-down the worst. If on the passenger side, nose-up is the worst.
Gary
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Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL