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Author Topic: Buying Stuff in Canada  (Read 6615 times)

Chris362

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Buying Stuff in Canada
« on: June 18, 2014, 05:27:13 PM »
I can't find the answers I'm looking for with the search engine. So, forgive me if this has been asked and answered.

I'm taking the RV to Alaska next month. Missouri to Fairbanks, through Colorado.

While in Canada;

Can I swipe my US debit/credit card (local Bank, Great Southern) in Canada to pay for gas?
If I can, are there any fees tacked on?
I tried calling the bank, but the rep I spoke with left me confused. She said if I ran it at the pump as credit, there shouldn't be any extra fees. Shouldn't be?

I pretty sure there are several fees for ATMs, but what about other places; restaurants, convenience stores.....

Also, my bank will exchange currency for a flat $7.00 fee, regardless of the amount. Is this the best way to get cash?

What is the best way to pay for gas?

Thanks to anyone that chimes in. All info is appreciated.

poncho62

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #1 on: June 18, 2014, 05:40:42 PM »
I am Canadian...When travelling in the States, I have found that I can use my debit card to withdraw cash from a bank, but cant use it in a store (Walmart etc) Not sure if it works the same the other way around.......As for credit cards, they work fine, no fees other than the exchange rate. Right now, the Canadian buck is about 90 cents US, so you will come out ahead.
Hanover, Ontario, Canada

buchanan

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #2 on: June 18, 2014, 05:50:32 PM »
I can't find the answers I'm looking for with the search engine. So, forgive me if this has been asked and answered.

I'm taking the RV to Alaska next month. Missouri to Fairbanks, through Colorado.

While in Canada;

Can I swipe my US debit/credit card (local Bank, Great Southern) in Canada to pay for gas?
If I can, are there any fees tacked on?
I tried calling the bank, but the rep I spoke with left me confused. She said if I ran it at the pump as credit, there shouldn't be any extra fees. Shouldn't be?

I pretty sure there are several fees for ATMs, but what about other places; restaurants, convenience stores.....

Also, my bank will exchange currency for a flat $7.00 fee, regardless of the amount. Is this the best way to get cash?

What is the best way to pay for gas?

Thanks to anyone that chimes in. All info is appreciated.
yes you can use your debit/CC to buy gas.Most CC  companys charge a 3% exchange commission.Visa does and iam sure the others do also
no one charges debit or credit card fees at any retail outlets .Some private ATM machine or ones  not affiliated with your bank will charge a useage fee same as in the usa.YES by all means if your bank will sell u CDN money at no commission and a flat fee of 7.00 do it as when we buy us up here its anywhere from.75% to 2.50% roughly per dollar changed plus the going exchange rate

buchanan

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #3 on: June 18, 2014, 05:54:56 PM »
I am Canadian...When travelling in the States, I have found that I can use my debit card to withdraw cash from a bank, but cant use it in a store (Walmart etc) Not sure if it works the same the other way around.......As for credit cards, they work fine, no fees other than the exchange rate. Right now, the Canadian buck is about 90 cents US, so you will come out ahead.

that's weird because I use my royal bank debit card and my scotia bank debit card all the time when iam in the us.have for last few years never ever refused
at Walmart or target or anywhere. CC(eg Visa) charge you 3% commission plus whatever the exchange is if u use a CDN CC in the usa so I try to never use my CDN CC when in the usa. I use cash as much as possible.I now have a wellsfargo account and a visa debit card.I get my US money at the roal bank at .75% exchange rate. hell of a lot better than 2.5 -3%  CC companys and other banks charge
« Last Edit: June 18, 2014, 05:56:54 PM by buchanan »

poncho62

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #4 on: June 18, 2014, 05:59:13 PM »
Maybe things have changed....been about 5 years since I was in US......debit would only work at banks....also Royal bank card
Hanover, Ontario, Canada

buchanan

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #5 on: June 18, 2014, 06:15:37 PM »
Maybe things have changed....been about 5 years since I was in US......debit would only work at banks....also Royal bank card

could be? All I know is my royal bank Debit card has always worked in the usa and so has my scotia Debit card and \I have been snowbirding with them for about 9 years now.I Use them at resturants,winco for food,walmart.home depot.lowes,sears  etc

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #6 on: June 18, 2014, 06:22:50 PM »
No problem with your US-issued credit cards - most places accept Visa and Mastercard. The "fee" for use in a non-dollar currency is built into the exchange rate the bank charges when converting from $C to $US. It is usually not the very best rate available, but in our experience (now a dozen years ago) it wasn't far off the official rate either. Never had reason to complain.

We also used our US debit card to get Canadian cash from ATMs. Most ATMs had an ATM fee, but the only other fee we paid was the exchange rate differential.  Some banks charge you a fee when you use any ATM not part of their local network, so that would apply if your bank does that.  I don't recall if we used debit card at any retail merchants.
Gary
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COMer

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #7 on: June 18, 2014, 08:05:59 PM »
Discover card is not accepted most of the places I have been.  PEI up to Nova Scotia.  Maybe one place out of twenty. 
John & Darla
Home near Erie, PA
Spend half the year with Campers on Mission

HappyWanderer

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #8 on: June 18, 2014, 08:33:26 PM »
Never had a problem using Visa or MasterCard logo debit or credit cards in Canada, or found fees unreasonable.

We always notify our bank and credit card companies when traveling; they will document where and when you'll be traveling.  Well, we do now after triggering a fraud alert for unusual account activity.
I don't have gray hair. I have wisdom highlights.

bucks2

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #9 on: June 18, 2014, 09:00:38 PM »
I find the extra 3-5% that the CC company tacks on in addition to the most advantageous (to them) exchange rate on that day obscene. I use a Capitol One MasterCard which has NO added fees. They charge only the exchange rate. I understand that PenFed cards may do this also.

I hated it years ago when I had a gas powered boat and would buy 160 gallons of overpriced Canadian gas every 3 days or so, and then pay an additional $15.00 "fee" for using a credit card. Now with my diesel powered boat I carry enough fuel to not buy any in Canada.

I'd look closely at a Capitol One card before I went.

Ken

buchanan

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #10 on: June 18, 2014, 09:11:39 PM »
I find the extra 3-5% that the CC company tacks on in addition to the most advantageous (to them) exchange rate on that day obscene. I use a Capitol One MasterCard which has NO added fees. They charge only the exchange rate. I understand that PenFed cards may do this also.

I hated it years ago when I had a gas powered boat and would buy 160 gallons of overpriced Canadian gas every 3 days or so, and then pay an additional $15.00 "fee" for using a credit card. Now with my diesel powered boat I carry enough fuel to not buy any in Canada.

I'd look closely at a Capitol One card before I went.

Ken
I hear you on the terrible fuel prices we endure up here but our medical,s  almost free  with no deductables($63$) per month in BC Free in lots of other provinces like Alberta

Tin man

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #11 on: June 18, 2014, 10:18:04 PM »
I can vouch for a capital one card nd Penn Fed card.  We use them all overbEurope, and never a charge or never refused.  The only problem was in Toures at the TGV I had to use my AMEX card.  MC and AMEX charge a exchange rate.

Jim

Same for Canada. AMEX and MC will be converting to the new chip card this year....
Jim W
AKA TIN MAN
2007 36G Journey SE
2010 Escape Hybrid Blue Ox Air Force 1 Brake

bucks2

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #12 on: June 18, 2014, 11:18:53 PM »
I hear you on the terrible fuel prices we endure up here but our medical,s  almost free  with no deductables($63$) per month in BC Free in lots of other provinces like Alberta

They charge me full price to visit a Dr in Canada and my US insurance whines and cry's about paying anything. Shouldn't you give me a discount on my fuel??????  ;D

Ken

buchanan

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #13 on: June 18, 2014, 11:23:43 PM »
They charge me full price to visit a Dr in Canada and my US insurance whines and cry's about paying anything. Shouldn't you give me a discount on my fuel??????  ;D

Ken

Haha ,A vist to a doctor in Canada is 1/3 what it costs in the us so Your insurance company should have given u a gas credit cause u saved them$$$ ;D

Chris362

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #14 on: June 19, 2014, 07:13:47 AM »
Thanks everyone.
From what I'm reading, I'm guessing the cheapest way is to estimate my gas and other purchases while in Canada and get that amount from my bank for the $7.00.
....and not to need medical attention in Canada.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #15 on: June 19, 2014, 07:49:48 AM »
bucks2 is the only one who reported being charged an extra fee to use a US credit card in Canada, but he didn't mention which card(s). I haven't had that experience with MC or Visa in either Canada or Europe, but it's been awhile.

You may find this official Q&A from Visa to be informative. Basically it says the exchange rate is calculated daily based on international currency prices and that there is no transaction fee to the card user.

http://usa.visa.com/personal/card-benefits/travel/exchange-rates-faq.jsp
Gary
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Ken & Sheila

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #16 on: June 19, 2014, 08:44:53 AM »
Per the Visa site it says: "Additionally, your final transaction amount may differ depending on whether the merchant converts the currency at the point of sale or if the bank that issues your card assesses a foreign transaction fee."

I can tell you that both Wells Fargo and Chase Visa cards and Discover card do charge a small "foreign transaction fee". I forget if AmEx charges a fee, but I think they do. These fees are small.
In Canada I used  a Charles Schwab Bank debit card to get cash because they reimburse all fees charged.

ken
currently in Victoria, BC
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Hfx_Cdn

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #17 on: June 19, 2014, 08:47:20 AM »
    Gary, as another poster indicated, they are cute in how they do it.  Similar to my using my Canadian Visa, it gets buried in the exchange rate.  As a retired banker one of the few perks that carries on is an ability to convert C$ to US$ at a staff rate, but it only applies to cash transactions, so if I withdraw from a US ATM, or have them move money from my chequing to a US domiciled chequing account, I get charges customer rate, and then if I use my Cdn Visa, the exchange rate goes up without explanation. 
    I will not use my USA bank debit card on the internet, so last winter when we wanted a couple of items that were not available locally, I did use my Cdn Visa, and the extra exchange rate was still being charged, at an additional 2.5%.  Since the amounts were small and we wanted the things while in Florida, it wasn't a deal breaker, but annoying nonetheless.
   All that to say, converting to cash for a flat fee is likely the least expensive by far, but while you won't be travelling through a high crime area, you do still need to be concerned.  Traveler's cheques may be another option if your bank doesn't charge too much for issuing them.
   Have a great trip.  Too bad you're going to be on the wrong coast.

Ed
Ed & Donna
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Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #18 on: June 19, 2014, 09:05:16 AM »
Agree, Ed, and I stated that in my original message on this subject. If you shop around, you may get a better exchange rate and that may well be worthwhile on large conversions. But the rate that Visa and MC charges usually wasn't too far off the official rate and you don't have get money in advance or carry around a lot of cash. More convenient at a small extra cost.

Note that local banks don't usually charge just the official exchange rate either. They calculate their own rate for the service, plus they often add on a fixed transaction fee as well. The best monetary deal is usually to find a bank that charges a fixed transaction fee plus the official daily exchange rate, and then exchange a fairly large amount of dollars to amortize the fixed fee over the entire amount.
Gary
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buchanan

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #19 on: June 19, 2014, 09:16:04 AM »
Thanks everyone.
From what I'm reading, I'm guessing the cheapest way is to estimate my gas and other purchases while in Canada and get that amount from my bank for the $7.00.
....and not to need medical attention in Canada.
that's a strange answer regarding medical.First off  make surer u have travel insurance as we all do. second off if u need to see a doctor in Canada is about one third what u pay in the us if for some reason u don't have a medical plan.your health insurance in the us is extremely high until u get to age 65 when your medicare pays for most of it. A friend of mine whom lives in Oregon and is 59 pays around 600$ per month and his deductible is $7000.I pay 65 and no dedcutable

Tin man

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #20 on: June 19, 2014, 09:26:56 AM »
Maybe I was not clear, but the charge is about 1 to 2 % of the charge that AMEX and MC (my cards) charge, my PEN FED  and Capital One has no foreign exchange charge. I use MC and AMEX only in US.  and I tell them so.  In Europe they have chips in there cards.  Only once did I have a problem with my cards, and than I had to use my AMEX. no chip in the cards. 

Don't forget to tell your credit card co. That you are traveling.  Makes for no surprises. Even than there is no guarantee.

See you in Alaka leaving in two weeks

Jim
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Daddo

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #21 on: June 19, 2014, 10:07:02 AM »
Good questions and since they are financial in nature, I posed them to my wife who works for Canada's largest credit union and has worked for a variety of Canadian banking institutions for the past 30+ years.
Quote
Can I swipe my US debit/credit card (local Bank, Great Southern) in Canada to pay for gas?
You can use your credit card virtually anywhere but debit card support is slightly different. Your debit card will work fine at some locations but it will not work everywhere. In order for your debit card to work the Canadian provider must be able to talk to the US provider of the debit card service - not all systems are able to do that.

Quote
If I can, are there any fees tacked on?
Most credit card providers will tack on both a currency exchange as well as an foreign transaction fee but their are options to alleviate for at least some of them. I have a US bank account with Bank of America and a Visa card that does not charge any foreign transaction fees. You may want to check with your bank. You should also be aware that the currency conversion rate applied to most credit cards is higher than that charged for a straight currency exchange at a bank.

Quote
I tried calling the bank, but the rep I spoke with left me confused. She said if I ran it at the pump as credit, there shouldn't be any extra fees. Shouldn't be?
art of the confusion here may be that their institution does not control what fees are applied by the service provider. Some ATM systems apply additional fees though I am not aware of any credit card systems that charge added fees, other than those mentioned above. These are beyond your bank's control.

Quote
Also, my bank will exchange currency for a flat $7.00 fee, regardless of the amount. Is this the best way to get cash?
If you are exchanging small amounts, such as a few thousand, your bank is probably the best bet when considering the convenience factor. If you are doing large sums such as $10k or more, many of the private currency exchange stores will provide you with a better rate but it takes a little extra time and effort on your part.

Quote
What is the best way to pay for gas?
Once again, considering the convenience factor, a credit card is the best solution at the gas pumps. It is also good to note that while traveling through BC, all gas pumps are pre-pay by provincial law. This makes even cash inconvenient.

Enjoy the trip and be sure to fuel up before crossing the border into Canada. The most expensive fuel you'll find is in the Alaskan Highway section between Fort Nelson (Northern BC) and Watson Lake (Yukon). The prices they charge along Muncho Lake and Liard are enough to take your breath away, along with your money. Be sure to fuel up in Fort Nelson and Watson Lake.
2005 Newmar Mountain Aire 43

Chris362

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #22 on: June 19, 2014, 10:08:35 AM »
that's a strange answer regarding medical.First off  make surer u have travel insurance as we all do. second off if u need to see a doctor in Canada is about one third what u pay in the us if for some reason u don't have a medical plan.your health insurance in the us is extremely high until u get to age 65 when your medicare pays for most of it. A friend of mine whom lives in Oregon and is 59 pays around 600$ per month and his deductible is $7000.I pay 65 and no dedcutable

I have 2 more years before Medicare kicks in, my wife has 7. She works part time, mainly for the health insurance. It costs us $600 a month with a $2,500 deductible.

I made the statement about medical attention in Canada because, even though I do have insurance, in Canada it would be considered "out of network" and I would have to pay a higher deductible (and hopefully, not have the hassle of getting them to pay their part).

I don't want to be rude, but I am aware of the low cost of medical insurance in Canada, but since I can't get it, I have no interest in discussing or comparing it in relation to travel.


Moving on: I read that most CC companies charge about a 3% fee. I just checked with my bank and they only charge a 1% fee when buying stuff. If I use an ATM for cash, they charge an additional fee of $2.50 per transaction...then whatever the ATM owner charges.

So, I've changed my mind. I'll use my credit card for gas and maybe get $100.00 in Canadian for incidentals.
And, be sure to fuel up in Fort Nelson and Watson Lake.

Again, that's everyone.
« Last Edit: June 19, 2014, 10:14:08 AM by Chris362 »

Tin man

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #23 on: June 19, 2014, 10:23:30 AM »
If you are a CITI BANK customer, they use 7/11 (and I believe WAWA has been added) ATM's no charge. 
 If you need to make a deposit on the road you take a picture of check front/back and send them the picture. Works for me...

Jim
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buchanan

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #24 on: June 19, 2014, 10:45:54 AM »
I have 2 more years before Medicare kicks in, my wife has 7. She works part time, mainly for the health insurance. It costs us $600 a month with a $2,500 deductible.

I made the statement about medical attention in Canada because, even though I do have insurance, in Canada it would be considered "out of network" and I would have to pay a higher deductible (and hopefully, not have the hassle of getting them to pay their part).

I don't want to be rude, but I am aware of the low cost of medical insurance in Canada, but since I can't get it, I have no interest in discussing or comparing it in relation to travel.


Moving on: I read that most CC companies charge about a 3% fee. I just checked with my bank and they only charge a 1% fee when buying stuff. If I use an ATM for cash, they charge an additional fee of $2.50 per transaction...then whatever the ATM owner charges.

So, I've changed my mind. I'll use my credit card for gas and maybe get $100.00 in Canadian for incidentals.
And, be sure to fuel up in Fort Nelson and Watson Lake.

Again, that's everyone.
would it not  be a whole lot cheaper for you by just getting a few K in cash and paying the $7.00 fee u said u could get and no commission charges
and lots of times u get cheaper fuel by paying cash

bucks2

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #25 on: June 19, 2014, 11:01:04 AM »
And the issue of foreign transaction fees, having to go inside to pay with cash, carrying a large amount of cash, having left over currency at the end of the trip which you then have to re-convert, and so on, goes away when you have a Capitol One credit card. Type "which credit cards don't have foreign transaction fees" into your favorite search engine and read to your hearts content about the subject.

If you're just going to make one trip to/thru Canada and never go back, paying the fees and enjoying the trip might be worth it. I'm making my 35th annual trip into Canada by boat this summer.......... I hate paying the fees.

Ken

Marsha/CA

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #26 on: June 19, 2014, 11:39:38 AM »
We were in Canada and Alaska in the summer of 2012.  American Express, as well as, our local Credit Union Visa charge card charged an extra fee for use in the Canada-3% on each.  Chase Credit Card did not.  We used our Chase card for everything.

When we were in Canada in 2009, we found that if you had a Bank of America Debit Card and used it at any Scotia Bank, either ATM or at the  counter, there was no charge for withdrawing cash other than the difference in the exchange rate.

Marsha~
2017 Heartland Mallard IDM231 Travel Trailer....Small but mighty.

Chris362

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #27 on: June 19, 2014, 11:48:05 AM »
And the issue of foreign transaction fees, having to go inside to pay with cash, carrying a large amount of cash, having left over currency at the end of the trip which you then have to re-convert, and so on, goes away when you have a Capitol One credit card. Type "which credit cards don't have foreign transaction fees" into your favorite search engine and read to your hearts content about the subject.

If you're just going to make one trip to/thru Canada and never go back, paying the fees and enjoying the trip might be worth it. I'm making my 35th annual trip into Canada by boat this summer.......... I hate paying the fees.

Ken

Great points.
I estimate I'll spend about $3,000 for gas in Canada.
I can exchange at my bank for $7.00, but then I have to do all the things you mention for cash.
Or, I can use my bank's card at 1% and pay $30.00 in transaction fees.
I think the $21.00 difference would be worth the convenience.

BUT... I just discovered my BankAmericard Rewards card doesn't charge a foreign transaction fee.

Problem solved.

buchanan

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #28 on: June 19, 2014, 11:48:35 AM »
And the issue of foreign transaction fees, having to go inside to pay with cash, carrying a large amount of cash, having left over currency at the end of the trip which you then have to re-convert, and so on, goes away when you have a Capitol One credit card. Type "which credit cards don't have foreign transaction fees" into your favorite search engine and read to your hearts content about the subject.

If you're just going to make one trip to/thru Canada and never go back, paying the fees and enjoying the trip might be worth it. I'm making my 35th annual trip into Canada by boat this summer.......... I hate paying the fees.

Ken
no more than I hate paying the fees when I go to the us as they get u coming and going these days

buchanan

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #29 on: June 19, 2014, 11:59:50 AM »
Great points.
I estimate I'll spend about $3,000 for gas in Canada.
I can exchange at my bank for $7.00, but then I have to do all the things you mention for cash.
Or, I can use my bank's card at 1% and pay $30.00 in transaction fees.
I think the $21.00 difference would be worth the convenience.

BUT... I just discovered my BankAmericard Rewards card doesn't charge a foreign transaction fee.

Problem solved.

not really U see this is where US banks BS their customers. Go ask them what the currency rate is that their changing over for u at this so called "no fee"
I looked on their web site and its x 0.9755    so if u don't think your being screwed by BA CC your need to give your head a shake. It should be around .093 today
that's a difference of 4.5 cents(%)  nothing is ever free even though they tell U so .yes no fees but an extremely unfair exchange rate
that's a 227.50 raking you would take on $5K

Chris362

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #30 on: June 19, 2014, 12:06:19 PM »
Since it seems I've gotten a lot of response in this thread, one more thing; suggestions where to get gas....towns, cities, etc.

I know I should get it just before I enter Canada and just before I get between Fort Nelson (Northern BC) and Watson Lake (Yukon). But, which places are the best?

The route will be a little different on the way back according to Google. We're going through Banff and Jasper National Parks on the way there, but not on the way back (thanks Daddo).  It's different between Calgary and Grande Prairie.

Tin man

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #31 on: June 19, 2014, 12:16:05 PM »
Chris

We are leaving from LI in two weeks to Alaska. We will stop in Banf Jasper on the way home late August early Sept. coming from Hyder. I'll look for you messages..

Jim
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Chris362

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #32 on: June 19, 2014, 12:49:52 PM »
Chris

We are leaving from LI in two weeks to Alaska. We will stop in Banf Jasper on the way home late August early Sept. coming from Hyder. I'll look for you messages..

Jim

We're leaving the end of this month and coming home the end of July.

I've notified my credit card companies.
I've gotten proof of insurance for Canada.
I've removed the guns from the RV.
I've made all necessary camping reservations.
I've bought a boatload of Deep Forest Off.

It's just this Canadian gas thing that has my head spinning.


Chris362

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #33 on: June 19, 2014, 01:13:01 PM »
not really U see this is where US banks BS their customers. Go ask them what the currency rate is that their changing over for u at this so called "no fee"
I looked on their web site and its x 0.9755    so if u don't think your being screwed by BA CC your need to give your head a shake. It should be around .093 today
that's a difference of 4.5 cents(%)  nothing is ever free even though they tell U so .yes no fees but an extremely unfair exchange rate
that's a 227.50 raking you would take on $5K

Not sure how to get around that. I just called my bank and to exchange there the rate was .9719. I asked and was told it's the same rate (plus the 1% fee) if I used my bank's card.

So, it's still my best bet to use the BofA card.

I really don't want to be carrying a lot of cash either.


buchanan

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #34 on: June 19, 2014, 02:14:02 PM »
We're leaving the end of this month and coming home the end of July.

I've notified my credit card companies.
I've gotten proof of insurance for Canada.
I've removed the guns from the RV.
I've made all necessary camping reservations.
I've bought a boatload of Deep Forest Off.

It's just this Canadian gas thing that has my head spinning.
what area are u going to where u need so much off?

buchanan

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #35 on: June 19, 2014, 02:16:05 PM »
Not sure how to get around that. I just called my bank and to exchange there the rate was .9719. I asked and was told it's the same rate (plus the 1% fee) if I used my bank's card.

So, it's still my best bet to use the BofA card.

I really don't want to be carrying a lot of cash either.

I don't understand the carry cash deal but to each their own but it proves to u what I said,
 No fees but a most terrible  exchange rate.There making 4-5% on the exchange so no wonder they don't need to show it as a CC charge

Daddo

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #36 on: June 19, 2014, 06:01:47 PM »
I know I should get it just before I enter Canada and just before I get between Fort Nelson (Northern BC) and Watson Lake (Yukon). But, which places are the best?
Fort Nelson and Watson Lake are about 320 miles apart so if you fill in one, you'll have enough to get you through to the other. Fuel up here in Canada is always more expensive that in the US but further up north on the Alcan it get even worse. The price for regular gas in Fort Nelson today is $1.52 per liter (1 US gallon = 3.785 liters). At today's currency rate of 0.92, that works out to $6.29 per US gallon.

Since you've mentioned going through Alberta, it's worth noting that fuel prices in Alberta are also lower than here in BC.

If you want to work out your fuel costs you can use sites like GasBuddy.com to get the local prices in a given city and then one of the conversion tables available on the web. I used http://www.mississauga4sale.com/Gasoline-Conversion-Calculator-litres-gallons-us.htm for the above conversion. It converse the liters to US gallons and you insert the current currency conversion rate for the monitory data.
2005 Newmar Mountain Aire 43

Chris362

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #37 on: June 20, 2014, 11:25:48 AM »
what area are u going to where u need so much off?

Russian River, Seward, Nenana..........
I was told the state bird of Alaska was the mosquito.

I don't understand the carry cash deal but to each their own but it proves to u what I said,
 No fees but a most terrible  exchange rate.There making 4-5% on the exchange so no wonder they don't need to show it as a CC charge

Like I said, I'd still get the crappy exchange rate if I exchanged at my bank for cash.
If I run across somewhere I can get a better exchange rate, I may reconsider. I'm figuring I'll have to buy about 250 gallons of gas in Canada. I may enjoy the trip better if I don't worry about saving what few bucks I could save on that.

Fort Nelson and Watson Lake are about 320 miles apart so if you fill in one, you'll have enough to get you through to the other. Fuel up here in Canada is always more expensive that in the US but further up north on the Alcan it get even worse. The price for regular gas in Fort Nelson today is $1.52 per liter (1 US gallon = 3.785 liters). At today's currency rate of 0.92, that works out to $6.29 per US gallon.

Since you've mentioned going through Alberta, it's worth noting that fuel prices in Alberta are also lower than here in BC.

If you want to work out your fuel costs you can use sites like GasBuddy.com to get the local prices in a given city and then one of the conversion tables available on the web. I used http://www.mississauga4sale.com/Gasoline-Conversion-Calculator-litres-gallons-us.htm for the above conversion. It converse the liters to US gallons and you insert the current currency conversion rate for the monitory data.

I plan to go about 400 miles between fill-ups, so I think I'll shoot for something like this for gas:
Conrad, Mt   gas in Conrad 3.46 US
Conrad to Banff 335 miles  gas in Banff 4.50 US
Banff to Grande Prairie 424 miles  gas in Grande Prairie 4.24 US
Grande Prairie to Fort Nelson 363 miles  gas in Fort Nelson 5.21 US
Fort Nelson to Watson Lake 319 miles  gas in Watson Lake 4.77 US
Watson Lake to Whitehorse 386 miles  gas in Whitehorse 4.77 US
Whitehorse to Tok 318 miles  gas in Tok 4.00 US

Of course if I see something better along the way, I'll stop there.
Hopefully, gas doesn't go up too much in the next few weeks. 

 

Tin man

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #38 on: June 20, 2014, 12:54:37 PM »
Ref why should the price of fuel go up?...



Why should it? Oh yea, fourth on July, the mess in Iraq,  and let's not forget "how can we gouge the consumer?  They have a a christmas wish list...... The only thing missing is a fire in a refinery....but the summer has just started....plent of time...
Jim W
AKA TIN MAN
2007 36G Journey SE
2010 Escape Hybrid Blue Ox Air Force 1 Brake

Ned

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #39 on: June 20, 2014, 01:50:39 PM »
Quote
The only thing missing is a fire in a refinery

Be careful what you wish for.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2014/06/18/iraqs-biggest-oil-refinery-is-on-fire-how-important-is-that/
-- Ned -- Fulltimer 1997-2013
1997 Holiday Rambler Endeavor LE
2007 GMC Canyon

Chris362

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Re: Buying Stuff in Canada
« Reply #40 on: June 20, 2014, 03:31:56 PM »
Ref why should the price of fuel go up?...



Why should it? Oh yea, fourth on July, the mess in Iraq,  and let's not forget "how can we gouge the consumer?  They have a a christmas wish list...... The only thing missing is a fire in a refinery....but the summer has just started....plent of time...

Be careful what you wish for.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2014/06/18/iraqs-biggest-oil-refinery-is-on-fire-how-important-is-that/

I blame both of you......
http://www.hindustantimes.com/punjab/chandigarh/major-fire-breaks-out-in-guru-gobind-singh-refinery-in-bathinda/article1-1231539.aspx

 

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