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Author Topic: Designing a RV Garage  (Read 11986 times)

John Beard

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Designing a RV Garage
« on: November 13, 2014, 09:13:42 AM »
I have the pleasure of designing a RV garage, so I've been thinking about what I will have within my RV garage. We are in the initial stages of design, having just closed on the property. Our house will be in the 1,800 to 2,500 sq ft range and my RV garage and shop will be in the 3,500 to 4,500 sq ft range (building a shop is relatively inexpensive since it is essentially a shell of a building). The RV garage will have a 12'Wx14'H door, and the inside bay dimensions will be approximately 20' x 55' x 16' (1,100 sq ft) which will house just about any RV on the market.

I will have at minimum in my RV Garage 50A/30A RV receptacle, sewer connection, floor drain, air compressor... So what am I missing? 
John & Susan
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Northwest Las Vegas, NV

zmotorsports

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #1 on: November 13, 2014, 09:15:55 AM »
Your missing adding another RV bay and having it next to my house. ;D

That sounds awesome John. 

Mike.
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John Beard

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #2 on: November 13, 2014, 09:20:51 AM »
Your missing adding another RV bay and having it next to my house. ;D

That sounds awesome John. 

Mike.

We will have a RV guest pad at the new property...so in a couple of years when we are done with this project feel free to come to Vegas for a free stay...
John & Susan
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2005 Jeep Wrangler X, Toad, a little modified
Northwest Las Vegas, NV

zmotorsports

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #3 on: November 13, 2014, 09:35:31 AM »
We'll take you up on that.  We haven't been to Vegas for leisure in many, many years.  Usually we are there for the drag races and don't get in to town much.

Mike.
2003 Monaco Dynasty Baroness
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Rene T

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #4 on: November 13, 2014, 09:42:32 AM »
So what am I missing?

Let me break it in!  ;D  It may take a few years.
Rene & Lucille & co-pilot Buddy
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pml

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #5 on: November 13, 2014, 10:03:46 AM »
I have been kicking around the idea of converting a cement block building on my property to an RV barn it's 30'x40 but I would need to modify the doors. they are 10feet high and 11 feet wide but the ceilings are 14' so I have the space. I was thinking of putting in a large wood stove to take the chill off in the winter. I think climate control for that big of an area would be very expensive.

Jeff in Ferndale Wa

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #6 on: November 13, 2014, 10:05:38 AM »
I would plumb water in.
I also would add a port in the wall where you could run a hose from your exhaust to the outside, in case you ever wanted to run the engine or your generator while indoors.
Maybe add a connection so you could hook your generator to your shore power in case of a power outage?
Do you plan to heat the building? If so,I would think about insulation.

I knew a couple that built just one building with a living area in part of it, and set up to use the RV as additional living space.
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utahclaimjumper

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #7 on: November 13, 2014, 10:40:45 AM »
 The problem with an "RV" garage is it gets used for everything else, my rv garage is 40'X45'X24' with two rollup doors and one walkthru door, one 12X14, one 10X10.  Over and above my "shop" is my truck, 24' foot boat & trailer, two cars, two motorcycles,one 38 foot motorhome, large upright compressor, AND JUNK!!   Make it as big as you can afford!!>>>Dan
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John Beard

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #8 on: November 13, 2014, 12:03:14 PM »
I would plumb water in.
I also would add a port in the wall where you could run a hose from your exhaust to the outside, in case you ever wanted to run the engine or your generator while indoors.
Maybe add a connection so you could hook your generator to your shore power in case of a power outage?
Do you plan to heat the building? If so,I would think about insulation.

I knew a couple that built just one building with a living area in part of it, and set up to use the RV as additional living space.

All good points and I added them to my list. The building will be stick framed, stucco/stone exterior, with R-19 walls, R-30 roof, and drywalled. I will add a few swamp coolers for our hot summers and I will have a natural gas ceiling mounted forced air heater for the two-weeks per year we get sub-freezing weather.

If zoning would allow I would just build an apartment inside the shop, but alas it is not allowed.

We are going to incorporate a stand-by natural gas generator into the house/shop construction for long term power outages.
John & Susan
2014 Winnebago Aspect 30J
2005 Jeep Wrangler X, Toad, a little modified
Northwest Las Vegas, NV

John Beard

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #9 on: November 13, 2014, 12:14:06 PM »
The problem with an "RV" garage is it gets used for everything else, my rv garage is 40'X45'X24' with two rollup doors and one walkthru door, one 12X14, one 10X10.  Over and above my "shop" is my truck, 24' foot boat & trailer, two cars, two motorcycles,one 38 foot motorhome, large upright compressor, AND JUNK!!   Make it as big as you can afford!!>>>Dan

Been there, done that, I've sold everything, Corvette, motorcycles, boat(s), etc., etc...
John & Susan
2014 Winnebago Aspect 30J
2005 Jeep Wrangler X, Toad, a little modified
Northwest Las Vegas, NV

Larry N.

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #10 on: November 13, 2014, 12:20:17 PM »
Will a 16' height be enough to let you roam around on the RV's roof when needed? Will there be lighting for that purpose, too?
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John Beard

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #11 on: November 13, 2014, 12:33:10 PM »
Will a 16' height be enough to let you roam around on the RV's roof when needed? Will there be lighting for that purpose, too?

I thought about that, 16' will allow me to crawl on the roof with ample room. And yes we'll have ceiling mounted fluorescent strip lighting throughout the shop. 
John & Susan
2014 Winnebago Aspect 30J
2005 Jeep Wrangler X, Toad, a little modified
Northwest Las Vegas, NV

utahclaimjumper

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #12 on: November 13, 2014, 01:23:31 PM »
 I'm amazed at how often I'm on my coach roof, always in the garage never outside, it gives me many overhead handholds for safety.>>>Dan
38' American Tradition 38TT/330 turbo Cummins
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BobNSam

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #13 on: November 13, 2014, 02:09:51 PM »
Do you plan to have wash up facilities? Maybe a rest area...😊
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dverstra

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #14 on: November 13, 2014, 04:19:26 PM »
Hot and cold running water to wash the rig. Oh...and maybe a bikini carwash 8)
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Jere and Laur

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #15 on: November 13, 2014, 04:58:01 PM »
I just finished building a 28x32 addition to my house that I started in the spring of 2011. Instead of stick frame we went with a SIP (structural insulated panel) 6" of Styrofoam and two plywood panels on the outside and inside. Less expensive for the kit with all the cutouts for windows and doors also with all the lumber and trusses and roofing and trim for a finished product.  $36500 for three sides, the fourth side was the original house. R25 sidewalls and R60 blown in cellulose up top, I put radiant heat in the cement slab. Works great. A phone call can't hurt.  PM me for more info. Jerremyp60@gmail.com
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John Beard

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #16 on: November 13, 2014, 05:04:56 PM »
I just finished building a 28x32 addition to my house that I started in the spring of 2011. Instead of stick frame we went with a SIP (structural insulated panel) 6" of Styrofoam and two plywood panels on the outside and inside. Less expensive for the kit with all the cutouts for windows and doors also with all the lumber and trusses and roofing and trim for a finished product.  $36500 for three sides, the fourth side was the original house. R25 sidewalls and R60 blown in cellulose up top, I put radiant heat in the cement slab. Works great. A phone call can't hurt.  PM me for more info. Jerremyp60@gmail.com

It looks like an interesting product. I haven't used it nor have I seen it used before. I'll do some research.
John & Susan
2014 Winnebago Aspect 30J
2005 Jeep Wrangler X, Toad, a little modified
Northwest Las Vegas, NV

RodgerS

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #17 on: November 13, 2014, 05:09:28 PM »
I would make it a drive-through garage and install an auto-lift, or even better, dig out a rectangular area and add a cement liner with steps so you can work comfortably underneath the chassis while standing up. You may find additional temporary uses for it as well when you are not storing your rv.  :)
Gone RVing with Susan
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RodgerS

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #18 on: November 13, 2014, 05:17:06 PM »
By the way, if you do put in an open pit service bay, be sure to install a safety net to avoid falls by the unwary or if you forget.
Gone RVing with Susan
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John Beard

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #19 on: November 13, 2014, 06:08:14 PM »
Although I will allow for a auto lift for the Jeep, it won't be going in on the original construction because of budget limitations. The motor home will just have to be happy on the ground, without a pit. I'll have grand kids running around and a pit is just too much of a hazard. There is no room for a drive through, too bad though that would be cool.
John & Susan
2014 Winnebago Aspect 30J
2005 Jeep Wrangler X, Toad, a little modified
Northwest Las Vegas, NV

Rstrahan

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #20 on: November 13, 2014, 06:25:36 PM »
Can you expand it, budget-wise, to 30' wide?  Even number sizes are easier for companies to build.  For that matter, if you are handy, companies make these things in kit form, you bolt together.  You will need to hire a couple of laborers and get the slab poured.  Be sure to insulate it, using chicken-wire to hold the insulation in place.
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Betty Brewer

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #21 on: November 13, 2014, 06:37:42 PM »
Mike ,

We built a 1650 square foot home in  2006 with an RV garage attached.    It is 20 x50 with 16 foot ceilings.  50 feet works but if you have a 45 foot motorhome  it would be nice to have a work bench so longer would have been better for us. Even  though our motorhome is  40 feet there is a good deal of  space taken up by the tow bar on end.  We took many of Jerry Fitzgeralds suggestions and put lots of ceiling lights along the  perimeter of the ceiling.  If the lights are in the  middle they don't shine down when rig is  parked.  Other  must have's have been mentioned, sewer  drain,  50 amp electrical. Water to fill rig.  Lots of  outlets along the walls.  We had tv antenna connections built in the  garage so  he just has to hook up a cable and we have TV inside while it is parked.  Another nice feature for us is that we  had a window placed at the  end of the garage.  Since we live  on a golf course, the  view from the rig is quite nice even when it is parked.  We use  it as a guest suite when we  have  any visitors who don't have a MH.  Our two car garage is open to the RV garage and  I have access directly  out my  back door through garage to  RV.  I love that.  We also  have swamp coolers with vents we can use if rig needs to  run for a short time  inside the vents circulate air.   I manage to store too much junk along the  perimeter walls.  Don't know how to avoid collecting  junk.  You know  Jeep parts, spare tires, sewer hoses Christmas decorations  what ever!   have a yard sale but stuff collects again!

We took tons of  photos during construction so ask away and we'll have a photo to show you!
Betty Brewer

see where we are

JerArdra

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #22 on: November 13, 2014, 06:58:10 PM »
Motorhome Garage

My MH garage dimensions are 50 feet long and 18 feet wide.   The inside ceiling is 16 feet high.  The door is 12 feet wide and 13 feet high (the door header gives 13 feet overhead clearance).  Inside ceiling height is 16 feet.  The sewer drain is 18 feet back from the overhead door so it is in close proximity to the coach sewer drain.  There is one 50 amp and one 20 amp electric socket on their own breakers along with water so I have water, sewer and electric inside the garage (full hookups).   I have a 30 amp electric connection and water at the outside rear of the garage.  This is so I could install an air cooler (swamp cooler).  There are 12 two-tube florescent lights around the perimeter of the ceiling about 3 feet in from the wall.  Do NOT put them in the middle of the ceiling because you will get poor lighting if you do because the height of the MH will block the light.  The overhead door is insulated with styrofoam insulation.  The garage is insulated.  There are three windows on each side of the 50 foot length.  The MH garage is connected to the car garage with a 9' X9' opening and we can enter the house from the car garage.

If I were doing it with more space on my lot I would make it 60 to 65 feet long in order to have more storage space at the front of the MH.  Also, it would add value at resale if the purchaser had a 45 foot MH.  Even though there is plenty of room to open the slide outs and walk around them I would make it 20 to 22 feet wide.  If you think that a Prevost owner might ever buy your property, should you sell it, make the overhead door clearance 14 feet because the newest Prevost MHs with a dome type satellite dish require 13 feet 5 inches of clearance.  The bottom line is make it larger when you first build it because it is MUCH more expensive to modify it later.

JerryF
« Last Edit: November 13, 2014, 07:06:44 PM by JerArdra »
JerryF  ;D  ;D

RodgerS

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #23 on: November 13, 2014, 07:46:08 PM »
I think I would just lock the door and keep the little ones out of the garage altogether...they don't need to be into everything. How about install a play yard outside with a little rv playroom for them, then you can have your maintenance pit, which seems to the-no-rv-guy a lot better than crawling under a motorhome or putting it up on some sort of steel ramps, but hey, what would I know.

In the reverse, if you like working on your roof, you could install a moveable rv roof platform for safety sake or a harness attached to the roof. Or just install rv Armor Roof, which is what I plan to install...when the time comes and stay off the roof.
Gone RVing with Susan
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RodgerS

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #24 on: November 13, 2014, 07:49:32 PM »
Hey JerArdra, sounds like the garage might be built, a few anticipated years forward, for his next rv beyond his current purchase, for when he goes full-time to 45 feet.  :)
Gone RVing with Susan
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RodgerS

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #25 on: November 13, 2014, 07:51:46 PM »
Now I'm assuming, of course, that even full-timers may have a couple of concrete pads they own, maybe with a garage on top.
Gone RVing with Susan
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John Beard

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #28 on: November 13, 2014, 09:21:13 PM »
Motorhome Garage

My MH garage dimensions are 50 feet long and 18 feet wide.   The inside ceiling is 16 feet high.  The door is 12 feet wide and 13 feet high (the door header gives 13 feet overhead clearance).  Inside ceiling height is 16 feet.  The sewer drain is 18 feet back from the overhead door so it is in close proximity to the coach sewer drain.  There is one 50 amp and one 20 amp electric socket on their own breakers along with water so I have water, sewer and electric inside the garage (full hookups).   I have a 30 amp electric connection and water at the outside rear of the garage.  This is so I could install an air cooler (swamp cooler).  There are 12 two-tube florescent lights around the perimeter of the ceiling about 3 feet in from the wall.  Do NOT put them in the middle of the ceiling because you will get poor lighting if you do because the height of the MH will block the light.  The overhead door is insulated with styrofoam insulation.  The garage is insulated.  There are three windows on each side of the 50 foot length.  The MH garage is connected to the car garage with a 9' X9' opening and we can enter the house from the car garage.

If I were doing it with more space on my lot I would make it 60 to 65 feet long in order to have more storage space at the front of the MH.  Also, it would add value at resale if the purchaser had a 45 foot MH.  Even though there is plenty of room to open the slide outs and walk around them I would make it 20 to 22 feet wide.  If you think that a Prevost owner might ever buy your property, should you sell it, make the overhead door clearance 14 feet because the newest Prevost MHs with a dome type satellite dish require 13 feet 5 inches of clearance.  The bottom line is make it larger when you first build it because it is MUCH more expensive to modify it later.

JerryF

You make some very good points. We are gathering proposals to get the Civil Improvement Plans completed, in Vegas subdividing and permitting a piece of raw land takes 12-18 months to get done. I agree I should go a big as I can for the RV Garage, that's why I wanted to get some experienced input.
John & Susan
2014 Winnebago Aspect 30J
2005 Jeep Wrangler X, Toad, a little modified
Northwest Las Vegas, NV

Rene T

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #29 on: November 14, 2014, 06:42:55 AM »
I agree I should go a big as I can for the RV Garage, that's why I wanted to get some experienced input.

How about nearly doubling the size and rent out the other half to help pay for the building.  You wouldn't have to go that much bigger, because the slide outs on the other rig would never be opened inside. You would need a second overhead door though.
Rene & Lucille & co-pilot Buddy
AKA  Pep N Mem
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From the Granite State of NH
& Florida Snowbird in Lakeland FL

John Beard

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #30 on: November 14, 2014, 06:53:52 AM »
How about nearly doubling the size and rent out the other half to help pay for the building.  You wouldn't have to go that much bigger, because the slide outs on the other rig would never be opened inside. You would need a second overhead door though.

I only have 1/2 acre to work with, my RV Garage will have 3-4 auto bays attached. We are going to put in a RV Guest pad (uncovered) for framily& friends.  But the truth is I wouldn't want to have any responsibility for anyone's rig in a rental situation.
John & Susan
2014 Winnebago Aspect 30J
2005 Jeep Wrangler X, Toad, a little modified
Northwest Las Vegas, NV

zmotorsports

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #31 on: November 14, 2014, 06:58:17 AM »
I only have 1/2 acre to work with, my RV Garage will have 3-4 auto bays attached. We are going to put in a RV Guest pad (uncovered) for framily& friends.  But the truth is I wouldn't want to have any responsibility for anyone's rig in a rental situation.

I don't blame you one bit there.  There is absolutely no way I would rent out space.  If I couldn't afford to have it the size I wanted without it needing to bring in money from rental then I simply couldn't afford it.  Which is exactly why our coach has to sit outside. :(

Mike.
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2008 Haulmark Edge 26'
2011 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited
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ArdraF

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #32 on: November 14, 2014, 03:32:43 PM »
Re those overhead lights.  The electrician thought we were nuts to have so many lights.  I told him I was tired of not being able to see stuff in our previous garage.  We LOVE them, especially at night when we can see into underbays and such.

Also, the swamp cooler is wonderful.  I can load and unload in relative comfort regardless of the temperature outside.  That thing is worth every penny!  And it's cheap to run. 

The ceiling height should be as high as you can make it.  You might not stand on the roof very often, but there have been a few times where it was nicer than crawling or kneeling.

ArdraF
ArdraF
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kevin

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #33 on: November 14, 2014, 05:53:36 PM »
we converted our truck wash shop for our mh garage. It is 60'long'50'wide not sure on the height, it has 6"concrete floors with drain, 5' concrete side walls then the trusses are on top of that, I think the opening is 16' tall. we park the mh on one side and are able to open all the slides. if it wasn't for all the crap we can't seem to get ride of, you could park 2 side by side. but with that said....how does one get rid of all the crap...lol we have a 48" fan in the center of the back wall, we turn it on when we run the mh or the gen.
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ArdraF

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #34 on: November 14, 2014, 06:05:56 PM »
Kevin's comment reminded about another wonderful use for the swamp cooler.  When we start the motorhome in the garage, there are always some diesel fumes.  We open the car garage door/s and the swamp cooler pushes those fumes right out.

Which further reminds me.  I have been known to burn a few things on the house kitchen range ( :-[ ::)).  When that happens, we turn the swamp cooler to fan, open the garage door into the house, open the sliding door in the kitchen, and blow the smoke out.  Yes, I do love the swamp cooler!  For those of you who live in high humidity areas and are unfamiliar with them, swamp coolers are used in the low humidity deserts.  Before air conditioners, swamp coolers were used to cool homes.
« Last Edit: November 14, 2014, 06:07:44 PM by ArdraF »
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Rene T

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #35 on: November 14, 2014, 06:50:12 PM »
What is a swamp cooler? Any pictures?
Rene & Lucille & co-pilot Buddy
AKA  Pep N Mem
2011 Chevy Duramax 2500 HD 4X4
2011 Montana High Country 343RL
From the Granite State of NH
& Florida Snowbird in Lakeland FL

HueyPilotVN

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #36 on: November 14, 2014, 08:29:13 PM »
A swamp cooler is a large square box that has a big squirrel cage fan inside it.  the sides have a bulky filter bed type composition that is soaked with water from nozzles to make all the incoming air have a much higher humidity, (water content in the air).  This humid air cools a dry desert type environment very well.

IN a humid part of the country a swamp cooler is not comfortable for the same reason that you do not use spray misters in that part of the country.

Hope that helps you to understan a swamp cooler.
Bill Waugh
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John Beard

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #37 on: November 15, 2014, 07:27:26 AM »
What is a swamp cooler? Any pictures?

Here is a link to a schematic of a swampy, http://www.dialmfg.com/about%20evaporative%20coolers.html
John & Susan
2014 Winnebago Aspect 30J
2005 Jeep Wrangler X, Toad, a little modified
Northwest Las Vegas, NV

Sr Fox

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #38 on: November 15, 2014, 07:39:31 AM »
As this seems like a dream project for me, all I can see that you are missing is a real good surround sound system with proper baffling and sound proofing so your neighbors will not complain. :)

Love this thread as I built a hot rod shop something like this years ago.

Enjoy!
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John Beard

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #39 on: November 15, 2014, 08:23:15 AM »
As this seems like a dream project for me, all I can see that you are missing is a real good surround sound system with proper baffling and sound proofing so your neighbors will not complain. :)

Love this thread as I built a hot rod shop something like this years ago.

Enjoy!

I will absolutely have a killer sound system in this well insulated garage... The insulation is a necessity in this geographic location, the Desert Southwest. My neighbors will be my two sons...  ;D

I am having fun thinking and dreaming about the possibilities. I can't do it all up front, but what I can do, is allow for it up front.
John & Susan
2014 Winnebago Aspect 30J
2005 Jeep Wrangler X, Toad, a little modified
Northwest Las Vegas, NV

Jere and Laur

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #40 on: November 15, 2014, 10:35:45 AM »
The SIP panels we put up are so quiet I need to put up an intercom for the front door. Friends come knocking at our front door and we literally yell for them to come in and have to go open the door for them, they can't hear us. The truss ceiling height is 16ft but I was building a home not an RV garage. When erected and install windows and doors it done. All you add is siding for outside and (after wiring and plumbing) sheetrock and paint, done!  Our heating bill dropped by over half and I cool the whole house with one 11k btu window A/C unit.
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JerArdra

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #41 on: November 15, 2014, 02:05:41 PM »
Another comment on our swamp cooler.  It is placed on a stand outside the MH garage about 2-feet above the ground level so the cool air enters the garage at a point 28 inches above the floor (definitely NOT at the ceiling).

The two windows that are open so the cooled air can escape from the garage when the air cooler is running are at the most distant far side of the car garage and they are at ceiling height many feet above the floor.  It was done this way so the cool air enters at floor level and, as the cool air is blowing in, it creates a slight air pressure pushing upward on the warmer air above and that in turn pushes the ceiling level hot air out the two windows.  A roof mounted air cooler would not cool as well as this arrangement.  And changing filters is MUCH easier at ground level rather than standing on a roof that is 17-18 feet high!!!

BTW, our air cooler pushes 6000 cubic feet of air into the garage every minute.  A neighbor of mine who did NOT have enough windows for the air to escape actually discovered fine cracks in the stucco walls of his garage, cause by air pressure, so do make sure you have large enough windows.

See the photo of my windows.  When open they provide about 12 square feet for air flow.  The outside screens are on to stop bugs.  Notice that the windows are horizontal sliders so the open part is closer to the ceiling because a normal household window is usually vertical which would put the open part much lower down from the ceiling.

JerryF

PS, In our garage floor plan the cooled air enters into the MH garage at the front driver's side of the MH.  It then goes to the rear of the MH and then into the car garage to cool it too and finally out the two windows.  So as the Frenchman Alexis de Tocquevile wrote about American Democracy in the 1700s, "this is the best of all possible worlds."  That is...as far as cooling goes!
« Last Edit: November 16, 2014, 02:05:50 PM by JerArdra »
JerryF  ;D  ;D

John Beard

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #42 on: November 15, 2014, 02:25:00 PM »
Another comment on our swamp cooler.  It is placed on a stand outside the MH garage about 2-feet above the ground level so the cool air enters the garage at a point 28 inches above the floor (definitely NOT at the ceiling).

The two windows that are open so the cooled air can escape from the garage when the air cooler is running are at the most distant far side of the car garage and they are at ceiling height many feet above the floor.  It was done this way so the cool air enters at floor level and, as the cool air is blowing in, it creates a slight air pressure pushing upward on the warmer air above and that in turn pushes the ceiling level hot air out the two windows.  A roof mounted air cooler would not cool as well as this arrangement.  And changing filters is MUCH easier at ground level rather than standing on a roof that is 17-18 feet high!!!

BTW, our air cooler pushes 6000 cubic feet of air into the garage every minute.  A neighbor of mine who did NOT have enough windows for the air to escape actually discovered fine cracks in the stucco walls of his garage, cause by air pressure, so do make sure you have large enough windows.

See the photo of my windows.  When open they provide about 12 square feet for air flow.  The outside screens are on to stop bugs.

JerryF

PS, In our garage floor plan the cooled air enters into the MH garage at the front driver's side of the MH.  It then goes to the rear of the MH and then into the car garage to cool it too and finally out the two windows.  So as the Frenchman Alexis de Tocquevile wrote about American Democracy in the 1700s, "this is the best of all possible worlds."  That is...as far as cooling goes!

Very good idea, I hadn't thought about that way before. In my current shop the swamp coolers are mounted about 10' above finish floor, and I leave my shop overhead doors open about a foot. Leaving the swampy at grade level would make maintenance much easier too.
John & Susan
2014 Winnebago Aspect 30J
2005 Jeep Wrangler X, Toad, a little modified
Northwest Las Vegas, NV

John Beard

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #43 on: November 15, 2014, 02:27:43 PM »
The SIP panels we put up are so quiet I need to put up an intercom for the front door. Friends come knocking at our front door and we literally yell for them to come in and have to go open the door for them, they can't hear us. The truss ceiling height is 16ft but I was building a home not an RV garage. When erected and install windows and doors it done. All you add is siding for outside and (after wiring and plumbing) sheetrock and paint, done!  Our heating bill dropped by over half and I cool the whole house with one 11k btu window A/C unit.

As soon as we get an Architect involved we will definitely look into this product. Anything we can do to save money over time is worth the look-see. We are also looking into Solar Power.
John & Susan
2014 Winnebago Aspect 30J
2005 Jeep Wrangler X, Toad, a little modified
Northwest Las Vegas, NV

John From Detroit

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #44 on: November 15, 2014, 02:40:23 PM »
Three things you should remember
One The maximum legal height for road vehicles without an oversize permit and special routing is 13'6" so make sure The door is at leaSt 14 feet.. NOTE; some doors hand down below the header, so if you hae that kind make sure the clearance is FOURTEEN FEET.

Two Motor homes are 8 1/2 foot wide NOT counting mirrors and awning arms and such,, and may be taller than you think so MAKE SURE THE DOOR IS WIDE ENOUGH.  At least 12 feet.

Third: the NEXT RV you buy may be taller.  (But still no more than 13'6") so make sure the door is tall enough (Fourteen high by at least 12, if not 14 wide. )

Oh, and make sure it's deep enough.. I mean I just read the story of a guy with a 35 foot RV and a 32 foot garage.
Nothing adds excitement like something that is none of your business
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John Beard

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #45 on: November 16, 2014, 06:58:20 AM »
Oh, and make sure it's deep enough.. I mean I just read the story of a guy with a 35 foot RV and a 32 foot garage.

When we built our current home in 1999-2000 I wanted to build my shop at least 30' deep, but the way our house lays out, my wife convinced me to build it 25' deep. When I bought my first RV a truck camper F550/Lance 1121 the overall length was 25', inches too long to fit in my shop. Lesson learned.

My new shop will be as long as I can appropriately fit on to the property. As soon as I can get a dimensioned site plan then I will be able to put pencil to paper and see how much shop I can appropriately fit.
John & Susan
2014 Winnebago Aspect 30J
2005 Jeep Wrangler X, Toad, a little modified
Northwest Las Vegas, NV

Jeff in Ferndale Wa

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #46 on: November 16, 2014, 10:42:17 AM »
....how does one get rid of all the crap...

Divorce... ;D
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Currently at work in King Cove, Alaska

kevin

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #47 on: November 16, 2014, 06:20:53 PM »
2006 Tour
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gave up on that winning lotto ticket!

John Beard

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #48 on: November 17, 2014, 06:52:25 AM »
but it's all my stuff.lol ;D

It gets easier with each piece you get rid of. My stuff was taking me over, I sold my 2009 Ultra-Glide on Craig's List (that was a hard one), I got rid of my 1996 Harley by giving it to my youngest son, next was the Corvette and I gave that to my oldest son, then the CJ5 went, I sold it to a friend, next was the F550,which I sold to my company and converted it to a flatbed truck, the camper went on Craig's List, and the little stuff, and camping stuff that I had accumulated went in a yard sale. It looks like I'll have another two rounds of yard sales before all of my lifetime of accumulation will be gone...forever.

In the next year I want to be rid of everything that I don't need for RVing and then the challenge is to keep it that way.
John & Susan
2014 Winnebago Aspect 30J
2005 Jeep Wrangler X, Toad, a little modified
Northwest Las Vegas, NV

Becks

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #49 on: November 17, 2014, 09:07:03 AM »
John, you are correct about it being a challenge not to accumulate stuff back down the road. Because we were not able to sell our house after getting rid of everything we have accumulated some back. And yes, it is stuff we really did not need.
2006 Travel Supreme
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kevin

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #50 on: November 17, 2014, 05:12:17 PM »
well I went into the rv garage today and started. I went thru six boxes of stuff and ended up throwing out enough stuff so what I kept went into three boxes. :D so I guess that's a start.
2006 Tour
2011 Buick Enclave

gave up on that winning lotto ticket!

John Beard

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #51 on: November 18, 2014, 08:45:12 AM »
well I went into the rv garage today and started. I went thru six boxes of stuff and ended up throwing out enough stuff so what I kept went into three boxes. :D so I guess that's a start.

The Old Chinese saying that a Journey of a thousand miles begins with the first step...Congratulations!
John & Susan
2014 Winnebago Aspect 30J
2005 Jeep Wrangler X, Toad, a little modified
Northwest Las Vegas, NV

John Beard

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #52 on: December 17, 2014, 07:27:49 AM »
We crossed an expensive hurdle this week, we received the proposals for the Civil Engineers. Now I have to beat them up a bit to get their numbers down into the breathable atmosphere and out of the Stratosphere. Then I have to read between the lines of their proposals to understand what they want to nail me for in additional services. It's a game they play here in Clark County, bid low in hopes of incurring additional costs to offset the low bid...CHANGE ORDERS.
John & Susan
2014 Winnebago Aspect 30J
2005 Jeep Wrangler X, Toad, a little modified
Northwest Las Vegas, NV

PatrioticStabilist

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #53 on: December 17, 2014, 09:49:29 PM »
We had our garage wired in Texas, the new one Tom never even go to use. 
The guy couldn't believe the amount of lights and receptacles he had put in, and I don't blame him,
I like to see and not be stringing cords all oer
.
So he said I'm doing this one.  He wants LOTS of lights, I said lets do LED's so you can really see,
think he will.  He had the side walls in his garage proper insulated but not the ceiling yet so he
could do the wiring.  But my RV garage only had a vapor barrier in the top and no insulation, but
just keeping the wind off does wonders.
Ours is 44 long, he wanted 42 and I added more, then its 48 wide I believe its 3 bays, then we did
and add in the back for another bay that squared it off.  He is going to add a lean to type garage in the
back to pt all his trailers and I call it yard junk in there.  So maybe another 20 foot out back?

I said we should have just built a big rectangular one, but we wanted it to have lines like the house so
that's what we did.  Tom drew it out and the amish guy did all the dormers and everything with no
drawings, I'm sure they had built similar and all the proportions came out nicely.  The motorhome garage
I believe is 18 foot high with a 16 foot door.  We wanted it big enough.  We have it dug out about a foot
with 6 inches of rock and then 8 inches of concrete I think it is, they said don't worry it won't crack.

He still wants to put an apron out there so he can work on it outside and not on the gravel.  He uses the apron at the house now we had done last summer about 36 by 38 so that helps. All that is expensive but he can use it even if we don't have a motorhome, right now he has his 16 foot trailer in the garage at the new rent house we bought.  I'm putting his tool trailer and our little trailer in the motorhome garage and lock it up when we leave.
The other side is half full of shelves, my boat and Tom's truck, the back part his tractor and one lawn mower plus shelves.  We bought those heavy commercial shelves from Sam's for it.  There are 10 to 15 of them, they also
line one side of the motorhome garage.  We got rid of tons of stuff in Texas, some Tom said I shouldn't have.  I asked him over and over and he told me get rid of that stuff and after I did, he goes you got rid of some of my
good stuff, sigh.  We are overloaded still.

johnandcarol

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #54 on: December 17, 2014, 10:30:57 PM »
2 years ago I completed my 24'x42' steel building on a cement foundation. I've managed to just keep the RV, tow dolly and boat in it.  I sure love the fact that my toys are out of the sun and rain unless I'm using them.

zmotorsports

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #55 on: December 18, 2014, 06:52:27 AM »
2 years ago I completed my 24'x42' steel building on a cement foundation. I've managed to just keep the RV, tow dolly and boat in it.  I sure love the fact that my toys are out of the sun and rain unless I'm using them.

That would be nice.  I would love to keep our coach and trailer indoors.

Mike.
2003 Monaco Dynasty Baroness
2008 Haulmark Edge 26'
2011 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited
FMCA# F315002

taoshum

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #56 on: December 18, 2014, 09:45:23 AM »
All good points and I added them to my list. The building will be stick framed, stucco/stone exterior, with R-19 walls, R-30 roof, and drywalled. I will add a few swamp coolers for our hot summers and I will have a natural gas ceiling mounted forced air heater for the two-weeks per year we get sub-freezing weather.

If zoning would allow I would just build an apartment inside the shop, but alas it is not allowed.

We are going to incorporate a stand-by natural gas generator into the house/shop construction for long term power outages.

didn't see a provision for coax connection to the satellite TV dish that is mounted outside somewhere???  Also internet service, probably wireless, unless you can access the fiber optic data pipes...  Also a roof vent, powered maybe?  You might want to "look" at some of the "Arizona Rooms" that have been designed in the big RV facilities around Phx... some very clever and thoughtful approaches...  One, for instance, is a floor outlet for power tools as compared to a dangling power box from the ceiling or extension cords lying around...
07 Itasca Meridian 34SH.  '08 Jeep Sahara.
Taos, NM.

mnmnutswer

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #57 on: December 19, 2014, 08:33:55 AM »
Water supply.
Terry & Kathy Weller
Direct Sales Jewelry
It goes where you are.

zmotorsports

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #58 on: April 06, 2017, 02:29:37 PM »
John, I realize it has been well over two years since you started this topic and started designing your RV garage for your new home.

I was wondering if you ever were able to get your house and RV garage built and how it turned out?

Mike.
2003 Monaco Dynasty Baroness
2008 Haulmark Edge 26'
2011 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited
FMCA# F315002

taoshum

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #59 on: April 10, 2017, 10:57:01 AM »
Another comment on our swamp cooler.  It is placed on a stand outside the MH garage about 2-feet above the ground level so the cool air enters the garage at a point 28 inches above the floor (definitely NOT at the ceiling).

The two windows that are open so the cooled air can escape from the garage when the air cooler is running are at the most distant far side of the car garage and they are at ceiling height many feet above the floor.  It was done this way so the cool air enters at floor level and, as the cool air is blowing in, it creates a slight air pressure pushing upward on the warmer air above and that in turn pushes the ceiling level hot air out the two windows.  A roof mounted air cooler would not cool as well as this arrangement.  And changing filters is MUCH easier at ground level rather than standing on a roof that is 17-18 feet high!!!

BTW, our air cooler pushes 6000 cubic feet of air into the garage every minute.  A neighbor of mine who did NOT have enough windows for the air to escape actually discovered fine cracks in the stucco walls of his garage, cause by air pressure, so do make sure you have large enough windows.

See the photo of my windows.  When open they provide about 12 square feet for air flow.  The outside screens are on to stop bugs.  Notice that the windows are horizontal sliders so the open part is closer to the ceiling because a normal household window is usually vertical which would put the open part much lower down from the ceiling.

JerryF

PS, In our garage floor plan the cooled air enters into the MH garage at the front driver's side of the MH.  It then goes to the rear of the MH and then into the car garage to cool it too and finally out the two windows.  So as the Frenchman Alexis de Tocquevile wrote about American Democracy in the 1700s, "this is the best of all possible worlds."  That is...as far as cooling goes!

Interesting perspective on the dynamics of the air flow.  There's no free lunch tho... cool, wet air is much heavier than warm, dry air so the fan on your swamp cooler has to work harder to move the cool, wet air from low to high.  OTOH, the warm, dry air wants to vent anyway since it is lighter... in fact some of the ancient middle east home designs used this effect to vent hot air and pull in cool air from below. 
07 Itasca Meridian 34SH.  '08 Jeep Sahara.
Taos, NM.

Lou Schneider

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #60 on: April 10, 2017, 04:36:38 PM »
Interesting perspective on the dynamics of the air flow.  There's no free lunch tho... cool, wet air is much heavier than warm, dry air so the fan on your swamp cooler has to work harder to move the cool, wet air from low to high.  OTOH, the warm, dry air wants to vent anyway since it is lighter... in fact some of the ancient middle east home designs used this effect to vent hot air and pull in cool air from below.

It's called chimney effect.  Hot air rises, if you place an opening at the top of the stack you'll draw in replacement air at the bottom.

Jerry's doing the same thing in his garage - if anything, the convection flow will help airflow through the swamp cooler, not hinder it.  I'll bet there's a slight airflow from convection through the cooler any time the windows are open, even if the cooler's fan is off.  So there is a free lunch, after all.

HyperCamp

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #61 on: April 11, 2017, 12:04:54 PM »
I too am wondering how this project ended up.   Any updates would be great!   Thanks
Russell and Nancy
Weatherford, Texas
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taoshum

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #62 on: April 13, 2017, 12:09:57 AM »
It's called chimney effect.  Hot air rises, if you place an opening at the top of the stack you'll draw in replacement air at the bottom.

Jerry's doing the same thing in his garage - if anything, the convection flow will help airflow through the swamp cooler, not hinder it.  I'll bet there's a slight airflow from convection through the cooler any time the windows are open, even if the cooler's fan is off.  So there is a free lunch, after all.

I understand the "chimney" effect...  I doubt that we have any data... either way.

refs:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evaporative_cooler

https://energy.gov/energysaver/evaporative-coolers

http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/articles/dept/musings/saving-energy-evaporative-cooler

http://www.eng-tips.com/viewthread.cfm?qid=187974

If it's "better" to install swamp coolers low and vent high then hundreds of thousands buildings in the SW have been doing it wrong for many decades.  The main drawback to installing high and venting low seems to be the maintenance problem of roof access and roof stains.  Most of the roof systems have a large central discharge vent and the flow is controlled by the open windows in the locations where cooling is needed most.  In technical terms if the blower moves 6,000 CFM, it completely dominates the flow and convection flow is miniscule in comparison plus pumping cool, heavy air from low to high would, in most cases, use much more energy to drive the blower/fan.  On top of that, gravity would dominate the convection flow in most situations.

If Jerry likes to push cool heavy air up, great.

07 Itasca Meridian 34SH.  '08 Jeep Sahara.
Taos, NM.

ArdraF

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #63 on: April 13, 2017, 05:16:00 PM »
Here's an update on our garage evaporative cooler.  We were very thankful to have it last summer when we had a flood in our stick and brick which forced us to live in the motorhome garage for three months.  That cooler was superb!  We only had several days when we had to use the motorhome air conditioning because of monsoonal moisture which lessened the cooler's ability to operate efficiently.

Also, after 17 years we just replaced the cooler with a new one - not because it wasn't working but because our extremely hard water had corroded it so badly the metal pieces were about ready to break apart.  The 1 horsepower motor did its job the entire 17 years.  And forget all the technical aspects of what you all have been talking about.  The fact is, our old evaporative cooler worked perfectly for 17 years by blowing/pushing the hot air through the length of the RV garage and across the width of three car garages to go out the ceiling height exit windows and it replaced that hot air with cooled air.  When it was 110-115 degrees outside, the garage was a comfortable 75-80 degrees.  We can't complain about that!

ArdraF
ArdraF
:D :D

taoshum

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #64 on: April 13, 2017, 09:31:37 PM »
Here's an update on our garage evaporative cooler.  We were very thankful to have it last summer when we had a flood in our stick and brick which forced us to live in the motorhome garage for three months.  That cooler was superb!  We only had several days when we had to use the motorhome air conditioning because of monsoonal moisture which lessened the cooler's ability to operate efficiently.

Also, after 17 years we just replaced the cooler with a new one - not because it wasn't working but because our extremely hard water had corroded it so badly the metal pieces were about ready to break apart.  The 1 horsepower motor did its job the entire 17 years.  And forget all the technical aspects of what you all have been talking about.  The fact is, our old evaporative cooler worked perfectly for 17 years by blowing/pushing the hot air through the length of the RV garage and across the width of three car garages to go out the ceiling height exit windows and it replaced that hot air with cooled air.  When it was 110-115 degrees outside, the garage was a comfortable 75-80 degrees.  We can't complain about that!

ArdraF

No doubt about it, they work great in a dry climate.  Not only the cooling effect but they filter the air and add humidity. We had them in ABQ, NM for 35 years and never needed a regular A/C unit.  We switched to an AeroCool unit after twenty years on the original unit.  One on the house and one on the garage.  Both discharged high and vented low though.  ABQ has "high mineral" or "hard" water too.  We found the best way to compensate for that was to run a bleed off the water pump that diverted a small amount of water to the trees... recycling at its best?.  Anyway, this caused the water in the swamp cooler to stay fresh and did not accumulate the mineral deposits as quickly as re-using the water many times.  Many locations now use the swamp cooler to pre-cool the heat exchanger for the regular A/C unit which vastly reduces the load on that unit as well.
07 Itasca Meridian 34SH.  '08 Jeep Sahara.
Taos, NM.

 

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