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Author Topic: Designing a RV Garage  (Read 11890 times)

John Beard

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #30 on: November 14, 2014, 06:53:52 AM »
How about nearly doubling the size and rent out the other half to help pay for the building.  You wouldn't have to go that much bigger, because the slide outs on the other rig would never be opened inside. You would need a second overhead door though.

I only have 1/2 acre to work with, my RV Garage will have 3-4 auto bays attached. We are going to put in a RV Guest pad (uncovered) for framily& friends.  But the truth is I wouldn't want to have any responsibility for anyone's rig in a rental situation.
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zmotorsports

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #31 on: November 14, 2014, 06:58:17 AM »
I only have 1/2 acre to work with, my RV Garage will have 3-4 auto bays attached. We are going to put in a RV Guest pad (uncovered) for framily& friends.  But the truth is I wouldn't want to have any responsibility for anyone's rig in a rental situation.

I don't blame you one bit there.  There is absolutely no way I would rent out space.  If I couldn't afford to have it the size I wanted without it needing to bring in money from rental then I simply couldn't afford it.  Which is exactly why our coach has to sit outside. :(

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ArdraF

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #32 on: November 14, 2014, 03:32:43 PM »
Re those overhead lights.  The electrician thought we were nuts to have so many lights.  I told him I was tired of not being able to see stuff in our previous garage.  We LOVE them, especially at night when we can see into underbays and such.

Also, the swamp cooler is wonderful.  I can load and unload in relative comfort regardless of the temperature outside.  That thing is worth every penny!  And it's cheap to run. 

The ceiling height should be as high as you can make it.  You might not stand on the roof very often, but there have been a few times where it was nicer than crawling or kneeling.

ArdraF
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kevin

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #33 on: November 14, 2014, 05:53:36 PM »
we converted our truck wash shop for our mh garage. It is 60'long'50'wide not sure on the height, it has 6"concrete floors with drain, 5' concrete side walls then the trusses are on top of that, I think the opening is 16' tall. we park the mh on one side and are able to open all the slides. if it wasn't for all the crap we can't seem to get ride of, you could park 2 side by side. but with that said....how does one get rid of all the crap...lol we have a 48" fan in the center of the back wall, we turn it on when we run the mh or the gen.
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ArdraF

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #34 on: November 14, 2014, 06:05:56 PM »
Kevin's comment reminded about another wonderful use for the swamp cooler.  When we start the motorhome in the garage, there are always some diesel fumes.  We open the car garage door/s and the swamp cooler pushes those fumes right out.

Which further reminds me.  I have been known to burn a few things on the house kitchen range ( :-[ ::)).  When that happens, we turn the swamp cooler to fan, open the garage door into the house, open the sliding door in the kitchen, and blow the smoke out.  Yes, I do love the swamp cooler!  For those of you who live in high humidity areas and are unfamiliar with them, swamp coolers are used in the low humidity deserts.  Before air conditioners, swamp coolers were used to cool homes.
« Last Edit: November 14, 2014, 06:07:44 PM by ArdraF »
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Rene T

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #35 on: November 14, 2014, 06:50:12 PM »
What is a swamp cooler? Any pictures?
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HueyPilotVN

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #36 on: November 14, 2014, 08:29:13 PM »
A swamp cooler is a large square box that has a big squirrel cage fan inside it.  the sides have a bulky filter bed type composition that is soaked with water from nozzles to make all the incoming air have a much higher humidity, (water content in the air).  This humid air cools a dry desert type environment very well.

IN a humid part of the country a swamp cooler is not comfortable for the same reason that you do not use spray misters in that part of the country.

Hope that helps you to understan a swamp cooler.
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John Beard

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #37 on: November 15, 2014, 07:27:26 AM »
What is a swamp cooler? Any pictures?

Here is a link to a schematic of a swampy, http://www.dialmfg.com/about%20evaporative%20coolers.html
John & Susan
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Sr Fox

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #38 on: November 15, 2014, 07:39:31 AM »
As this seems like a dream project for me, all I can see that you are missing is a real good surround sound system with proper baffling and sound proofing so your neighbors will not complain. :)

Love this thread as I built a hot rod shop something like this years ago.

Enjoy!
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John Beard

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #39 on: November 15, 2014, 08:23:15 AM »
As this seems like a dream project for me, all I can see that you are missing is a real good surround sound system with proper baffling and sound proofing so your neighbors will not complain. :)

Love this thread as I built a hot rod shop something like this years ago.

Enjoy!

I will absolutely have a killer sound system in this well insulated garage... The insulation is a necessity in this geographic location, the Desert Southwest. My neighbors will be my two sons...  ;D

I am having fun thinking and dreaming about the possibilities. I can't do it all up front, but what I can do, is allow for it up front.
John & Susan
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Jere and Laur

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #40 on: November 15, 2014, 10:35:45 AM »
The SIP panels we put up are so quiet I need to put up an intercom for the front door. Friends come knocking at our front door and we literally yell for them to come in and have to go open the door for them, they can't hear us. The truss ceiling height is 16ft but I was building a home not an RV garage. When erected and install windows and doors it done. All you add is siding for outside and (after wiring and plumbing) sheetrock and paint, done!  Our heating bill dropped by over half and I cool the whole house with one 11k btu window A/C unit.
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JerArdra

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #41 on: November 15, 2014, 02:05:41 PM »
Another comment on our swamp cooler.  It is placed on a stand outside the MH garage about 2-feet above the ground level so the cool air enters the garage at a point 28 inches above the floor (definitely NOT at the ceiling).

The two windows that are open so the cooled air can escape from the garage when the air cooler is running are at the most distant far side of the car garage and they are at ceiling height many feet above the floor.  It was done this way so the cool air enters at floor level and, as the cool air is blowing in, it creates a slight air pressure pushing upward on the warmer air above and that in turn pushes the ceiling level hot air out the two windows.  A roof mounted air cooler would not cool as well as this arrangement.  And changing filters is MUCH easier at ground level rather than standing on a roof that is 17-18 feet high!!!

BTW, our air cooler pushes 6000 cubic feet of air into the garage every minute.  A neighbor of mine who did NOT have enough windows for the air to escape actually discovered fine cracks in the stucco walls of his garage, cause by air pressure, so do make sure you have large enough windows.

See the photo of my windows.  When open they provide about 12 square feet for air flow.  The outside screens are on to stop bugs.  Notice that the windows are horizontal sliders so the open part is closer to the ceiling because a normal household window is usually vertical which would put the open part much lower down from the ceiling.

JerryF

PS, In our garage floor plan the cooled air enters into the MH garage at the front driver's side of the MH.  It then goes to the rear of the MH and then into the car garage to cool it too and finally out the two windows.  So as the Frenchman Alexis de Tocquevile wrote about American Democracy in the 1700s, "this is the best of all possible worlds."  That is...as far as cooling goes!
« Last Edit: November 16, 2014, 02:05:50 PM by JerArdra »
JerryF  ;D  ;D

John Beard

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #42 on: November 15, 2014, 02:25:00 PM »
Another comment on our swamp cooler.  It is placed on a stand outside the MH garage about 2-feet above the ground level so the cool air enters the garage at a point 28 inches above the floor (definitely NOT at the ceiling).

The two windows that are open so the cooled air can escape from the garage when the air cooler is running are at the most distant far side of the car garage and they are at ceiling height many feet above the floor.  It was done this way so the cool air enters at floor level and, as the cool air is blowing in, it creates a slight air pressure pushing upward on the warmer air above and that in turn pushes the ceiling level hot air out the two windows.  A roof mounted air cooler would not cool as well as this arrangement.  And changing filters is MUCH easier at ground level rather than standing on a roof that is 17-18 feet high!!!

BTW, our air cooler pushes 6000 cubic feet of air into the garage every minute.  A neighbor of mine who did NOT have enough windows for the air to escape actually discovered fine cracks in the stucco walls of his garage, cause by air pressure, so do make sure you have large enough windows.

See the photo of my windows.  When open they provide about 12 square feet for air flow.  The outside screens are on to stop bugs.

JerryF

PS, In our garage floor plan the cooled air enters into the MH garage at the front driver's side of the MH.  It then goes to the rear of the MH and then into the car garage to cool it too and finally out the two windows.  So as the Frenchman Alexis de Tocquevile wrote about American Democracy in the 1700s, "this is the best of all possible worlds."  That is...as far as cooling goes!

Very good idea, I hadn't thought about that way before. In my current shop the swamp coolers are mounted about 10' above finish floor, and I leave my shop overhead doors open about a foot. Leaving the swampy at grade level would make maintenance much easier too.
John & Susan
2014 Winnebago Aspect 30J
2005 Jeep Wrangler X, Toad, a little modified
Northwest Las Vegas, NV

John Beard

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #43 on: November 15, 2014, 02:27:43 PM »
The SIP panels we put up are so quiet I need to put up an intercom for the front door. Friends come knocking at our front door and we literally yell for them to come in and have to go open the door for them, they can't hear us. The truss ceiling height is 16ft but I was building a home not an RV garage. When erected and install windows and doors it done. All you add is siding for outside and (after wiring and plumbing) sheetrock and paint, done!  Our heating bill dropped by over half and I cool the whole house with one 11k btu window A/C unit.

As soon as we get an Architect involved we will definitely look into this product. Anything we can do to save money over time is worth the look-see. We are also looking into Solar Power.
John & Susan
2014 Winnebago Aspect 30J
2005 Jeep Wrangler X, Toad, a little modified
Northwest Las Vegas, NV

John From Detroit

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #44 on: November 15, 2014, 02:40:23 PM »
Three things you should remember
One The maximum legal height for road vehicles without an oversize permit and special routing is 13'6" so make sure The door is at leaSt 14 feet.. NOTE; some doors hand down below the header, so if you hae that kind make sure the clearance is FOURTEEN FEET.

Two Motor homes are 8 1/2 foot wide NOT counting mirrors and awning arms and such,, and may be taller than you think so MAKE SURE THE DOOR IS WIDE ENOUGH.  At least 12 feet.

Third: the NEXT RV you buy may be taller.  (But still no more than 13'6") so make sure the door is tall enough (Fourteen high by at least 12, if not 14 wide. )

Oh, and make sure it's deep enough.. I mean I just read the story of a guy with a 35 foot RV and a 32 foot garage.
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John Beard

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #45 on: November 16, 2014, 06:58:20 AM »
Oh, and make sure it's deep enough.. I mean I just read the story of a guy with a 35 foot RV and a 32 foot garage.

When we built our current home in 1999-2000 I wanted to build my shop at least 30' deep, but the way our house lays out, my wife convinced me to build it 25' deep. When I bought my first RV a truck camper F550/Lance 1121 the overall length was 25', inches too long to fit in my shop. Lesson learned.

My new shop will be as long as I can appropriately fit on to the property. As soon as I can get a dimensioned site plan then I will be able to put pencil to paper and see how much shop I can appropriately fit.
John & Susan
2014 Winnebago Aspect 30J
2005 Jeep Wrangler X, Toad, a little modified
Northwest Las Vegas, NV

Jeff in Ferndale Wa

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #46 on: November 16, 2014, 10:42:17 AM »
....how does one get rid of all the crap...

Divorce... ;D
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kevin

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #47 on: November 16, 2014, 06:20:53 PM »
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gave up on that winning lotto ticket!

John Beard

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #48 on: November 17, 2014, 06:52:25 AM »
but it's all my stuff.lol ;D

It gets easier with each piece you get rid of. My stuff was taking me over, I sold my 2009 Ultra-Glide on Craig's List (that was a hard one), I got rid of my 1996 Harley by giving it to my youngest son, next was the Corvette and I gave that to my oldest son, then the CJ5 went, I sold it to a friend, next was the F550,which I sold to my company and converted it to a flatbed truck, the camper went on Craig's List, and the little stuff, and camping stuff that I had accumulated went in a yard sale. It looks like I'll have another two rounds of yard sales before all of my lifetime of accumulation will be gone...forever.

In the next year I want to be rid of everything that I don't need for RVing and then the challenge is to keep it that way.
John & Susan
2014 Winnebago Aspect 30J
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Northwest Las Vegas, NV

Becks

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #49 on: November 17, 2014, 09:07:03 AM »
John, you are correct about it being a challenge not to accumulate stuff back down the road. Because we were not able to sell our house after getting rid of everything we have accumulated some back. And yes, it is stuff we really did not need.
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kevin

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #50 on: November 17, 2014, 05:12:17 PM »
well I went into the rv garage today and started. I went thru six boxes of stuff and ended up throwing out enough stuff so what I kept went into three boxes. :D so I guess that's a start.
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John Beard

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #51 on: November 18, 2014, 08:45:12 AM »
well I went into the rv garage today and started. I went thru six boxes of stuff and ended up throwing out enough stuff so what I kept went into three boxes. :D so I guess that's a start.

The Old Chinese saying that a Journey of a thousand miles begins with the first step...Congratulations!
John & Susan
2014 Winnebago Aspect 30J
2005 Jeep Wrangler X, Toad, a little modified
Northwest Las Vegas, NV

John Beard

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #52 on: December 17, 2014, 07:27:49 AM »
We crossed an expensive hurdle this week, we received the proposals for the Civil Engineers. Now I have to beat them up a bit to get their numbers down into the breathable atmosphere and out of the Stratosphere. Then I have to read between the lines of their proposals to understand what they want to nail me for in additional services. It's a game they play here in Clark County, bid low in hopes of incurring additional costs to offset the low bid...CHANGE ORDERS.
John & Susan
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Northwest Las Vegas, NV

PatrioticStabilist

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #53 on: December 17, 2014, 09:49:29 PM »
We had our garage wired in Texas, the new one Tom never even go to use. 
The guy couldn't believe the amount of lights and receptacles he had put in, and I don't blame him,
I like to see and not be stringing cords all oer
.
So he said I'm doing this one.  He wants LOTS of lights, I said lets do LED's so you can really see,
think he will.  He had the side walls in his garage proper insulated but not the ceiling yet so he
could do the wiring.  But my RV garage only had a vapor barrier in the top and no insulation, but
just keeping the wind off does wonders.
Ours is 44 long, he wanted 42 and I added more, then its 48 wide I believe its 3 bays, then we did
and add in the back for another bay that squared it off.  He is going to add a lean to type garage in the
back to pt all his trailers and I call it yard junk in there.  So maybe another 20 foot out back?

I said we should have just built a big rectangular one, but we wanted it to have lines like the house so
that's what we did.  Tom drew it out and the amish guy did all the dormers and everything with no
drawings, I'm sure they had built similar and all the proportions came out nicely.  The motorhome garage
I believe is 18 foot high with a 16 foot door.  We wanted it big enough.  We have it dug out about a foot
with 6 inches of rock and then 8 inches of concrete I think it is, they said don't worry it won't crack.

He still wants to put an apron out there so he can work on it outside and not on the gravel.  He uses the apron at the house now we had done last summer about 36 by 38 so that helps. All that is expensive but he can use it even if we don't have a motorhome, right now he has his 16 foot trailer in the garage at the new rent house we bought.  I'm putting his tool trailer and our little trailer in the motorhome garage and lock it up when we leave.
The other side is half full of shelves, my boat and Tom's truck, the back part his tractor and one lawn mower plus shelves.  We bought those heavy commercial shelves from Sam's for it.  There are 10 to 15 of them, they also
line one side of the motorhome garage.  We got rid of tons of stuff in Texas, some Tom said I shouldn't have.  I asked him over and over and he told me get rid of that stuff and after I did, he goes you got rid of some of my
good stuff, sigh.  We are overloaded still.

johnandcarol

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #54 on: December 17, 2014, 10:30:57 PM »
2 years ago I completed my 24'x42' steel building on a cement foundation. I've managed to just keep the RV, tow dolly and boat in it.  I sure love the fact that my toys are out of the sun and rain unless I'm using them.

zmotorsports

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #55 on: December 18, 2014, 06:52:27 AM »
2 years ago I completed my 24'x42' steel building on a cement foundation. I've managed to just keep the RV, tow dolly and boat in it.  I sure love the fact that my toys are out of the sun and rain unless I'm using them.

That would be nice.  I would love to keep our coach and trailer indoors.

Mike.
2003 Monaco Dynasty Baroness
2008 Haulmark Edge 26'
2011 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited
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taoshum

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #56 on: December 18, 2014, 09:45:23 AM »
All good points and I added them to my list. The building will be stick framed, stucco/stone exterior, with R-19 walls, R-30 roof, and drywalled. I will add a few swamp coolers for our hot summers and I will have a natural gas ceiling mounted forced air heater for the two-weeks per year we get sub-freezing weather.

If zoning would allow I would just build an apartment inside the shop, but alas it is not allowed.

We are going to incorporate a stand-by natural gas generator into the house/shop construction for long term power outages.

didn't see a provision for coax connection to the satellite TV dish that is mounted outside somewhere???  Also internet service, probably wireless, unless you can access the fiber optic data pipes...  Also a roof vent, powered maybe?  You might want to "look" at some of the "Arizona Rooms" that have been designed in the big RV facilities around Phx... some very clever and thoughtful approaches...  One, for instance, is a floor outlet for power tools as compared to a dangling power box from the ceiling or extension cords lying around...
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Taos, NM.

mnmnutswer

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #57 on: December 19, 2014, 08:33:55 AM »
Water supply.
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zmotorsports

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #58 on: April 06, 2017, 02:29:37 PM »
John, I realize it has been well over two years since you started this topic and started designing your RV garage for your new home.

I was wondering if you ever were able to get your house and RV garage built and how it turned out?

Mike.
2003 Monaco Dynasty Baroness
2008 Haulmark Edge 26'
2011 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited
FMCA# F315002

taoshum

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Re: Designing a RV Garage
« Reply #59 on: April 10, 2017, 10:57:01 AM »
Another comment on our swamp cooler.  It is placed on a stand outside the MH garage about 2-feet above the ground level so the cool air enters the garage at a point 28 inches above the floor (definitely NOT at the ceiling).

The two windows that are open so the cooled air can escape from the garage when the air cooler is running are at the most distant far side of the car garage and they are at ceiling height many feet above the floor.  It was done this way so the cool air enters at floor level and, as the cool air is blowing in, it creates a slight air pressure pushing upward on the warmer air above and that in turn pushes the ceiling level hot air out the two windows.  A roof mounted air cooler would not cool as well as this arrangement.  And changing filters is MUCH easier at ground level rather than standing on a roof that is 17-18 feet high!!!

BTW, our air cooler pushes 6000 cubic feet of air into the garage every minute.  A neighbor of mine who did NOT have enough windows for the air to escape actually discovered fine cracks in the stucco walls of his garage, cause by air pressure, so do make sure you have large enough windows.

See the photo of my windows.  When open they provide about 12 square feet for air flow.  The outside screens are on to stop bugs.  Notice that the windows are horizontal sliders so the open part is closer to the ceiling because a normal household window is usually vertical which would put the open part much lower down from the ceiling.

JerryF

PS, In our garage floor plan the cooled air enters into the MH garage at the front driver's side of the MH.  It then goes to the rear of the MH and then into the car garage to cool it too and finally out the two windows.  So as the Frenchman Alexis de Tocquevile wrote about American Democracy in the 1700s, "this is the best of all possible worlds."  That is...as far as cooling goes!

Interesting perspective on the dynamics of the air flow.  There's no free lunch tho... cool, wet air is much heavier than warm, dry air so the fan on your swamp cooler has to work harder to move the cool, wet air from low to high.  OTOH, the warm, dry air wants to vent anyway since it is lighter... in fact some of the ancient middle east home designs used this effect to vent hot air and pull in cool air from below. 
07 Itasca Meridian 34SH.  '08 Jeep Sahara.
Taos, NM.

 

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