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Author Topic: 1st post. Shopping for a Class A  (Read 27390 times)

johnd393

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1st post. Shopping for a Class A
« on: December 22, 2014, 04:47:59 AM »
I don't know if I'll end up with a motorhome or just enjoy the shopping and learning experience and not buy anything. Wife is not real enthusiastic.
I once bought a rough class C and parked it at my dad's house than never did much work on it. Dad used it as a extra room to get away by himself. It was 30 mils away from my home which made working on it inconveint. . I've been interested in a one of those 70's GMC classics but had never been in one. One came up for sale local for $4000. I looked at but it's way too much of a project for me. I really didn't like the driver seating position. It felt really cramped. I felt too close to the windshield and couldn't stretch my legs out. Looks like the GMC's are out.

There is a 88 Holiday Rambler Imperial, 454,  less than 50k miles on it for $3750. The owner say there's no delamination, but there is some ceiling damage. One of the A/C's has been removed and there' a tarp over. Its supposed to run good. Seller is too old to work on it. It apparently has not been used for a while. It's about 60 miles away. My next step is to call and get the VIN and see if I can learn any history before running over to look at it. Than if I look at it and it pass mine and my wifes inspection, and does not smell bad, get a pro to check out the engine drivetrain and suspension.  Hopefully the tires are good enough to get it home.

I'm handy enough to fix almost anything but I don't want to be doing big jobs like pulling an engine or trans. I could replace an appliance, replace  manifold,  throttle body or carburtor if I can get at it How difficult is accessing the engines to like change a water pump, starter manifold, oxigen sensor etc?. How does one work under them safely?
I read that the missing A/C could be replaced with a roof vent. I don't want to see any damage where that A/C was.

I would start with some short trips of under 200 mile to see how we like rving. There's some car shows we could go to, some shopping trips, park it by a house I need to work on.

Budget? I can't justify spending $20000 on one. Don't want to spend money fixing up one that cost $10000. Could buy one for 3000 to 5000 and spend a few thousand on it if will add equivalent  to its value.
John

HotTommy

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Re: 1st post. Shopping for a Class A
« Reply #1 on: December 22, 2014, 07:28:32 AM »
Are you seeking advice or just thinking out loud?  It sort of sounds like you're trying to justify a purchase that might not be a good idea.  If that is the case, you may find my recent experience informative.

I'm retired and I get bored during the winter when its too cold to go outside and work on a project.  So I spend hours at the computer imagining one new project or another.  Last winter I caught the RV bug again (I've had two motorhomes in past years) and I set my budget at about $7,000.  There are plenty of older motorhomes on the market at that price, but few I would trust to hop in and drive 2,000 miles.  I searched via the Internet for three months and made several 100+ mile trips to see disappointing motorhomes.  One the way back from one trip I saw a motorhome parked in someone's front yard with a for sale sign on it.  A test drive and an hour later I had bought it for $7,000.  I hadn't done as much research as usual because of the unexpected nature of the find, but I felt comfortable because the Blue Book value was about twice what I paid.  After all, how much could I have missed?

I made a horrible mistake.  It turned out there was massive water damage to walls, floor and cabinets.  I spent the summer removing, repairing and replacing much of the interior.  It's mostly finished now and I enjoy projects, so I didn't mind the work too much.  I still have less than the Blue Book value in it in cash, but I would have been in a deep hole if I had paid someone to do the work.

My main point is that cheap motorhomes are cheap for a reason.  Unless you like doing work yourself, it will likely be a money pit and you will not break even.  If you want to find out if you like RVing, rent one and try it out.  It will be cheaper in the long run.  ..... One more thought.  Because motorhomes get such poor gas mileage, you will not save money by traveling in one unless you spend a lot of time parked at your destination.  So, a 200 mile trip followed by a seven night stay is a good value in a motorhome.  A 400 mile trip for a two night stay is not.

Good luck in whatever you choose.

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: 1st post. Shopping for a Class A
« Reply #2 on: December 22, 2014, 08:18:56 AM »
As long as you are handy and can do most repairs yourself, an old motorhome can be a fun project and financially manageable. The risks are substantial, though, as HotTommy's experience shows. Old motorhomes can easily become a money-pit, so tread carefully. Water damage can be major, and a failed fridge or generator is a big expense to replace or repair. New tires are another big expense and almost a given for any old RV.

Don't get sucked in by what may seem like minor generator issues. A generator that won't start or quickly stalls out needs much more than spark plugs. And one that runs but produces no power will require major bucks to get going again.

An old motorhome is only worth around $5k-$8k no matter how much you improve it.
Gary
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RodgerS

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Re: 1st post. Shopping for a Class A
« Reply #3 on: December 22, 2014, 08:57:12 AM »
The comments seem right on to me, except for characterizing the situation as a potential money pit.  If we don't know, we will certainly soon know, that if you buy an old broken down boat, airplane, rv, or car, you need to budget a lot of money if you want that baby to work reliably on the road so you can enjoy it.

All RVs are money pits.

Now here is a really impressive money pit. I just saw a 2013 RV up for private sale at $132, the owner paid around $350 new. So that money pit is roughly $120 blown off over something like a two year period, not counting the interest paid. Worse, much worse, if he trades it into a dealer and buys another impressive money pit.

But that is no problem because he had the money to spend and it was his right to do so and he doesn't have to justify it.

So, when I buy my money pit, I plan to enjoy it as it will soak me either right in front of my eyes or hidden behind those itty bitty monthly payments.

Here is a question: Why are there so many dps out there with long years and short mileage? I think there are a lot of reasons, but a money pit certainly is high on the list.
Gone RVing with Susan
Class B- RV: 2001 Mercedes CLK320 Soft Top

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Re: 1st post. Shopping for a Class A
« Reply #4 on: December 22, 2014, 09:01:22 AM »
I found a 93 Bounder with a reman long block for $7500. I put about $4000 in parts and tires in it. I did all repairs my self, complete rear brakes wheel seals out, master cylinder, new front pads, water pump, fan clutch, radiator, belts and hoses, exhaust manifolds, additional tranny cooler, recoat the rubber roof, and all the heat shields the engine installer eliminated. All appliances worked no leaks. After all that I was a little over what similar rigs were advertised at in MA. Made a maiden voyage to south Texas and needed a fuel pump.

For 12K I have a rig that I know pretty well, has 5k on the engine 43k on the rest of it. It helps to real handy, the radiator would have been over 2k if I paid to have it done, recoring the radiator cost $800 by itself. Them radiators are in a black hole on class A rigs!

Bill
Bill & Nan
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I'm an analog guy in a digital age.

HotTommy

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Re: 1st post. Shopping for a Class A
« Reply #5 on: December 22, 2014, 11:03:36 AM »
Now here is a really impressive money pit. I just saw a 2013 RV up for private sale at $132, the owner paid around $350 new. So that money pit is roughly $120 blown off over something like a two year period, not counting the interest paid. Worse, much worse, if he trades it into a dealer and buys another impressive money pit.

I agree with everything in your post (except for the typo that made your math wrong). But somehow, it feels worse for a guy who can barely afford a $4,000 unit to end up with $8,000 in a unit he can neither use nor sell.  The guy who paid $250K for a new one should have known what depreciation to expect.  I suspect a lot of people who buy a $4k motorhome don't really understand what they're getting.

1275gtsport

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Re: 1st post. Shopping for a Class A
« Reply #6 on: December 22, 2014, 11:48:41 AM »
not to beat a dead horse. but depending on what seat and how it was mounted in the 70's GMC there is plenty of room up front. at leat in the palm beach model that I have. I had to put a 2 inch extension in the steering column so it made it more comfortable to drive. yes the windshield is rather close on the left (cause it wraps around) but it is all I can do to reach the gps stuck to the windshield. of course I am only 5' 8" so maybe if your a lot taller.. anyway I have leather seats out of a yukon denelli edition very comfy and really have a lot of adjustment.
However I do also agree that a 4k unit may be a rather large project. depends on how much of the work you WANT to do.
we paid about 6k for the rig and are around 7-9k in total at this point. still needs to have a few things re-done including the re-upholstery. and of course paint on the out side. when complete should be worth anywhere from just about what I have into it or hopefully more. most of the nice complete ones I have seen run around 15k

but don't EVER buy a Motor home as an investment! never never expect to make money on selling one. hope against hope that your will get out at least even. Motor homes are ment to be enjoyed (and driven)   not as a money making venture. unless you own a dealership. :)

They don't have to be money pits but then can be. I lost over 5k on the first one I bought and sold 2 years latter. how ever the guy that bought it from me lost it all as the motor went on him 3 months after he bought it. so you pay your money and ya take your chance. pick a rig that YOU feel comfortable in.
1977 GMC 26 foot Palm Beach
1976 Austin Mini

johnd393

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Re: 1st post. Shopping for a Class A
« Reply #7 on: December 22, 2014, 01:28:47 PM »
Great posts. You guys sound like you know me.
I was hoping for some comments about the 88 Holiday Rambler Imperial and, for motorhomes in general, How difficulty is accessing the engine, drivetrain and suspension for repairs. Does one buy a big floor jack and jack stands?

I'm mostly looking on Craigslist for by owners. Several sellers have failed to respond to emails and a couple who did sounded like scammers.

There is also a 96 Winnebago adventurer 34, 460 66k miles, w/slide out, for $8500. The ad says it's been on recent trips and only points out some faded paint and decals. I just called. The tires were not replaced as a set but are about 2 years old. Generator may need the carb cleaned. Still owes money on it. My RMD would pay for it and a tank of gas.

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: 1st post. Shopping for a Class A
« Reply #8 on: December 22, 2014, 05:02:00 PM »
The engine and tranny are nearly always a PITA to access in a motorhome - the body is built around them with little or no attention to future access for repairs. Sometimes even routine maintenance is difficult. Ditto for the genset.

No RV generator ever "just needs a carb cleaning". Disabuse your self of that notion upfront. If you do manage to get away with a thorough carb clean (soak 24 hours in a carb cleaner bath), buy a Lotto ticket cause your luck is running hot!

The 96 Adventurer sounds OK, but many other things to check. See the RV buying checklists in the forum Library under CHECKLISTS. The 96 460 engine is a strong one, but the accompanying transmission (Ford E4OD)  doesn't match the gears well to the heavy load. Does great in 3rd and OD, but has to drop to 2nd gear at any grade, even a common 3% climb.
Gary
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Re: 1st post. Shopping for a Class A
« Reply #9 on: December 22, 2014, 05:46:21 PM »
I use a 12 ton bottle jack and jack stands meant for medium trucks. !/2" or thicker plywood pads under jack stands for dirt or black top. Generally you take front wheels off and remove inner fender panels for access to sides of engine for M/C, spark plugs and many other accessories. I always drive up on 4X8 blocks of wood before jacking. Be extremely safety conscious when jacking.

Bill
Bill & Nan
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93 bounder 34, chevy chassis
couple of aircooled vw's, 1 fast(sold), 1 reliable(sold).  Dubless : (
USN '76-'80, 1 boat, USS Blandy, DD 943.
I'm an analog guy in a digital age.

johnd393

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Re: 1st post. Shopping for a Class A
« Reply #10 on: December 23, 2014, 04:14:22 AM »
Gary
Good to know about that Ford E4OD Trans. Is it also a reliability issue?  I'm a Chevy man but Ford has kinda made a good name in trucks.  I've printed the motorhome checklist. That's a pretty detailed list. It points to some things I might not of thought to check. That's what I'd expect to have been done when buying from a dealer. I will have my own priorities cus I best know my own capabilities.
The generator. If it turns and has compression and the bearing are not shot, it can be made to run.

Bill,  Good info. That's the kind of stuff I need to know. I have several floor jacks and jack stands,none of which is heavy enough for something that big. Can the load leveling jacks get the RV high enough to get jack stands under it. Are there support points where you can put jack stands.

driftless shifter

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Re: 1st post. Shopping for a Class A
« Reply #11 on: December 23, 2014, 07:38:46 AM »
I don't know about leveling jacks, I would still drive up on blocks to give more clearance for jacking in case the jack slips. Up front, I use crossmember that suspension mounts to for jacking and stands if greasing suspension or, jack from center of crossmember and stands under "A" arms for working through fender wells. Rear end, I jack from forward spring mounts right on the spring, place jack stands under spring perches on axle. Only lift rear axle on level ground with front wheels firmly chocked from moving either way. NEVER lift all 4 wheels, the likelyhood of vehicle tumbling off stands is extreme.

Bill
Bill & Nan
(o\_!_/o)
93 bounder 34, chevy chassis
couple of aircooled vw's, 1 fast(sold), 1 reliable(sold).  Dubless : (
USN '76-'80, 1 boat, USS Blandy, DD 943.
I'm an analog guy in a digital age.

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: 1st post. Shopping for a Class A
« Reply #12 on: December 23, 2014, 08:17:15 AM »
Quote
Good to know about that Ford E4OD Trans. Is it also a reliability issue?

Not at all - it's a solid tranny. Just the spacing of the gear ratios. But there is only so much you can do with 4 forward gears (including OD). If you try to maximize higher gears for economy and smooth shifts, you come up short in the mid-range between there and the oomph required for 1st gear. You really need at least 5 speeds in a motorhome tranny, but those weren't available until 2002 (Workhorse W20/W22 chassis) and even later in the Ford F53.

Some people added a Gear Vendors Over/Under drive to their mid-90's gas coaches, effectively doubling the number of gears. A very nice add-on, but expensive, so you won't find many with that installed.
Gary
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Summers: Black Mountain, NC
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99WinAdventurer37G

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Re: 1st post. Shopping for a Class A
« Reply #13 on: December 23, 2014, 12:42:25 PM »
Let me add my two cents.  It speaks more to getting a MH in general. 

I'm a single guy, no kids.  I have a farm that I like to spend time at, but haven't decided where to build a house yet.  So I bought a 99' Winnebago Adventurer 37G.  It had all the maintenance records and all the owners manuals.  A gas unit that I only planned to use at my farm to set up in different places to decide where I really wanted to build.  I figured a building mistake would be more costly than a few thousand dollars spent on a MH.

I had a budget of $10,000, but settled on this unit at $23,000, spent about $2,000 on all the "accessories" ie. blocks, sewer hoses, fresh water hose, chocks, etc..  They add up quickly.  Tune ups, and minor repairs have run me around $4,000 in about 2.5 years.  So even without "major" expenses it can add up quickly; BUT;

My sister found out about the MH and asked me to do a trip with them to the NC mountains.  I took the MH over there and all the other families (all related) I was staying with, had tents.  It rained almost the entire trip.  Their tents were flooded, so they all stayed in my MH high and dry.  We played games, kids slept on the floor of the MH, in both the drivers chair and passenger chair that turn and recline.  Adults were all sharing a bed.  We all had such a great time.  They said the MH saved the vacation.  That made me feel so good that I purchased the MH, regardless of the cost.  That trip was what I call priceless!

There have been other trips, that individually I feel "paid for the MH in memories."  But this last one, I drove it to FL to my parents house, had it rigged up for their oxygen machines, to take them to a family reunion.  They got to see the great, great grand kids.  This never would have happened without the MH, as they simply would not have gone.  But in the MH they felt safe, generator, back up batteries, all there for their oxygen, a bathroom always available that they don't have to wait for and is clean, beds to lie down on in transit, and there truck driver son to get them where they need to go safely.  I couldn't put a price on that trip either, even though we didn't overnight in the MH.  My parents will tell that story to their friends the rest of their lives.  And no one knows, the probability that the whole family will get together again. Could I put a price on that?  I think not.

So, many things I had not planned on, many memories have been made besides these, with friends as well as family, and I did not think I could do this in a 99 MH, I was just getting it for use at the farm.  As I look back on the expense; I know these memories will last much longer than the MH.  And had I not spent the money on the MH, it would have probably gone to something else, much less rewarding.

Also, I've heard that "Jesus paid it all,"  so in Heaven I won't have any need for the money anyway. ;)
1999 Winnebago Adventurer 37G , Ford V-10
2006 Honda VTX 1300S

Kevin Means

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Re: 1st post. Shopping for a Class A
« Reply #14 on: December 23, 2014, 05:43:40 PM »
Great stuff 99WinAdventurer37G and I couldn't agree more. It often seems like the unplanned things make the best memories.

Kev
2011 Winnebago Tour 42QD
Towing a Jeep Rubicon Unlimited LJ or an Acura MDX
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Lakeside, California

johnd393

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Re: 1st post. Shopping for a Class A
« Reply #15 on: December 23, 2014, 10:05:33 PM »
Still pondering those compromises with a 4 speed trans. Living here in flatland Indiana I think I would prefer it optimized for cruising speed on a level highway.

Molaker

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Re: 1st post. Shopping for a Class A
« Reply #16 on: December 23, 2014, 10:15:34 PM »
My cent and a half...would you buy an 88 Pontiac and expect to not spend a lot of money on it to make it dependable?  Doesn't mean you won't luck out, but the key word is "luck".
Tom & Joyce and Ditto the "don't tell her she's a dog" Westie
U.S. Navy (Ret)
2014 Winnebago ERA 70X 24' class B Sprinter chassis

johnd393

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Re: 1st post. Shopping for a Class A
« Reply #17 on: December 24, 2014, 11:53:05 AM »
My cent and a half...would you buy an 88 Pontiac and expect to not spend a lot of money on it to make it dependable?  Doesn't mean you won't luck out, but the key word is "luck".
I wish buying a motorhome was as easy as buying a 88 Pontiac. I used to check out cars more thoroughly but after several decades of buying and driving used cars, there are visual, audible, smellable, seat of the pants cues to almost anything that can be wrong. I think the brain can pick up on cues we are not even aware of an tell us "this car doesn't feel right".  Am I starting mythical?  If you have repeated bad luck with used cars you are not listening to the force. Kidding. Sort of.
John

Molaker

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Re: 1st post. Shopping for a Class A
« Reply #18 on: December 24, 2014, 12:46:16 PM »
I wish buying a motorhome was as easy as buying a 88 Pontiac. I used to check out cars more thoroughly but after several decades of buying and driving used cars, there are visual, audible, smellable, seat of the pants cues to almost anything that can be wrong. I think the brain can pick up on cues we are not even aware of an tell us "this car doesn't feel right".  Am I starting mythical?  If you have repeated bad luck with used cars you are not listening to the force. Kidding. Sort of.
John
Perhaps you missed my meaning, which admittedly, is frequently obscure.  Just be aware going in that buying any '88 motor vehicle is going to require work and expense and then you still have an '88 model.  True, most of us have some experience with automobiles and a motor home is effectively an automobile with all the problems of an automobile, but then piled on its back is a house with all the problems of a house (that gets bounced down the road).  So, buying an old motor home must be approached more from the standpoint of a restore project (which are always costly) rather than just an opportunity to pick up a cheap RV.  That doesn't say there aren't lots of older motor homes that are in terrific shape.  But, the only way to really find out if they are in terrific shape is to use it for a while...kind of a catch 22.
Tom & Joyce and Ditto the "don't tell her she's a dog" Westie
U.S. Navy (Ret)
2014 Winnebago ERA 70X 24' class B Sprinter chassis

johnd393

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Re: 1st post. Shopping for a Class A
« Reply #19 on: December 24, 2014, 04:28:28 PM »
Molaker
I didn't mean to disagree. I was just sharing my thoughts about it. I think buying a MH is more difficult. So many new things to check. I don't think I can trust my instincts about the systems that are shared.  I've still never driven  class A.
It's starting to make buying from a dealer more attractive.
Soon everything's gonna be covered with snow. We have a Florida trip planed. Maybe I can get some FL dealer to give me a driving lesson.

Ken & Sheila

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Re: 1st post. Shopping for a Class A
« Reply #20 on: December 24, 2014, 05:00:40 PM »
Molaker
I didn't mean to disagree. I was just sharing my thoughts about it. I think buying a MH is more difficult. So many new things to check. I don't think I can trust my instincts about the systems that are shared.  I've still never driven  class A.
It's starting to make buying from a dealer more attractive.
Soon everything's gonna be covered with snow. We have a Florida trip planed. Maybe I can get some FL dealer to give me a driving lesson.

LazyDays in Seffner, FL (near Tampa) used to give regular RV driving class. I pretty sure they still do.

One thing to be aware of in older HR products. They have Aluminum Roof and sides, but the roof is flat with a seam down the middle. This seam can be a source of leaks. Easy fix with Eternabond if the inside damage isn't severe. Good thing is the all the framing is also aluminum son there won't be any rotted wood framing to fix.

ken
« Last Edit: December 24, 2014, 05:04:50 PM by Ken & Sheila »
Ken & Sheila
2009 Monaco Camelot 42 PDQ
2008 Jeep Liberty, 2006 Saturn Vue
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thedjjack

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Re: 1st post. Shopping for a Class A
« Reply #21 on: December 25, 2014, 02:57:38 AM »
shop carefully...  older rigs can treat you right...  bought my 1983 G3500 6.2L Diesel brougham for around your price...  sight on seen...  Drove 20hours to pick it up...blew an oil cooler line 1hour into the trip home.  Caught it with smell and a dancing pressure gauge in time...

Driven all over (every drive for me is in the mountains) been a reliable rig....  would I drive it 2000 miles tomorrow yes.. would I pack my tools yes...  but I trust it more than some of these newer rigs... 


cadee2c

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Re: 1st post. Shopping for a Class A
« Reply #22 on: December 25, 2014, 09:11:09 AM »
Having an inspection done wouldn't be a bad idea. It could save you money in the long run, and they know what to look out for.

Caryl
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johnd393

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Re: 1st post. Shopping for a Class A
« Reply #23 on: December 26, 2014, 03:56:32 PM »
If tires 7 to 10 years old should be replaced.  Should I be afraid to drive a MH, with old tires, 60 to 90 miles home, perhaps keeping speed under 55 or 45?

TonyDtorch

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Re: 1st post. Shopping for a Class A
« Reply #24 on: December 26, 2014, 04:19:30 PM »
If tires 7 to 10 years old should be replaced.  Should I be afraid to drive a MH, with old tires, 60 to 90 miles home, perhaps keeping speed under 55 or 45?
Just keep an eye and ear out for the tires, many times you feel a difference in the steering wheel or the brake pedal and that is a signal to pull over and check the tires.

I bought a 11 year old motorhome on Ebay, it was 300 miles away in Phoenix.  I drove there got in it and drove it home on 7 year old tires.
 I wasn't expecting an 11 year old motorhome to be perfect, but it was perfect for me.

 I look at everything as just part of the big adventure of life, even a flat tire.

« Last Edit: December 26, 2014, 04:40:22 PM by TonyDtorch »

99WinAdventurer37G

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Re: 1st post. Shopping for a Class A
« Reply #25 on: December 26, 2014, 05:22:11 PM »
Many times one can spot tire separations, as well as other severe problems with a good, thorough visual inspection.  By a careful inspection, you are looking, and feeling for abnormalities.  As you feel from the inside to the outside of the tire, it should be smooth, it should not have any splits in the rubber, one should not be able to see any steel, and if there is any dry rot, that would be of immediate concern.  I've seen people drive on very old tires without any problems, but it's just a roll of the dice.  Certainly proper air pressure and low speed travel will lower the risk of a tire failure.

A blow out on a steer tire could result in loss of control of the vehicle, many times resulting in a rollover.  So I would keep a firm grip on the steering wheel.   A blow out on any tire can result in severe damage to the MH, and the failure to pull over immediately after a tire failure can result in damage to the rim, requiring replacement, and more damage to the MH.
1999 Winnebago Adventurer 37G , Ford V-10
2006 Honda VTX 1300S

Deano2002

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Re: 1st post. Shopping for a Class A
« Reply #26 on: December 27, 2014, 06:55:09 PM »
Take it from a person that bought a 1990 motorhome, I have put a good amount of money into it (for what it is) and there is still more to do. I paid 3850.00 for it and have probably put that much into it, less tires. I would NEVER do it again, I would get a loan for something much better like a diesel pusher. Way too much time involved and with everyone wanting to go to the rv park we belong to, there's not enough time to work on it and get the things done that I want too. I've resealed the roof, built a new dinette booth, all new belts under the hood, new jack knife sofa, new fridge with a custom frame around it, new tile replaced the carpet in the bathroom, new toilet, new bathroom vanity and top with new faucet. I starting working on the bottom part of the MH where the cargo doors are, the front ones were rusting thru, so I tore the galvanized panels out and had new ones made and I reinstalled them. I now will have to repaint the bottom 30" of the coach all the way around this spring. I have all the supplies ( base coat, clear coat) and all the primer, just have to get motivated early this year, weather permitting of course. Oh yea, I bought  a new awning this past fall which will be installed once the painting is completed. All in all, if I was 20 years younger this might not be much of a problem, but I am done with projects like this anymore. Next one will be a 40' DP with a couple of slideouts, then we can live in it out at the club for the summer with decent room to move about.
1989 Champion LaSalle 34' project

99WinAdventurer37G

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Re: 1st post. Shopping for a Class A
« Reply #27 on: December 28, 2014, 02:31:33 PM »
Take it from a person that bought a 1990 motorhome, I have put a good amount of money into it (for what it is) and there is still more to do. I paid 3850.00 for it and have probably put that much into it, less tires. I would NEVER do it again, I would get a loan for something much better like a diesel pusher. Way too much time involved and with everyone wanting to go to the rv park we belong to, there's not enough time to work on it and get the things done that I want too. I've resealed the roof, built a new dinette booth, all new belts under the hood, new jack knife sofa, new fridge with a custom frame around it, new tile replaced the carpet in the bathroom, new toilet, new bathroom vanity and top with new faucet. I starting working on the bottom part of the MH where the cargo doors are, the front ones were rusting thru, so I tore the galvanized panels out and had new ones made and I reinstalled them. I now will have to repaint the bottom 30" of the coach all the way around this spring. I have all the supplies ( base coat, clear coat) and all the primer, just have to get motivated early this year, weather permitting of course. Oh yea, I bought  a new awning this past fall which will be installed once the painting is completed. All in all, if I was 20 years younger this might not be much of a problem, but I am done with projects like this anymore. Next one will be a 40' DP with a couple of slideouts, then we can live in it out at the club for the summer with decent room to move about.

It sounds to me that it has been a good learning experience though.  With your comment that the "Next one will be..." it doesn't sound like it has ruined your MH dreams, but taught you a lot about what you want out of the MH experience for under $8,000.  Most people would call that a low cost education.
1999 Winnebago Adventurer 37G , Ford V-10
2006 Honda VTX 1300S

TonyDtorch

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Re: 1st post. Shopping for a Class A
« Reply #28 on: December 28, 2014, 04:00:37 PM »
It sounds to me that it has been a good learning experience though.  With your comment that the "Next one will be..." it doesn't sound like it has ruined your MH dreams, but taught you a lot about what you want out of the MH experience for under $8,000.  Most people would call that a low cost education.

and the opposite side of that is a guy I know that bought one of the last $400k 3 axle Country Coach motorhomes ever made, and he's had nothing but problems...

like the whole rear cap fell completely off, and the whole front cap cracked and separated from the mail body with water damage inside. he claims that the motorhome was a total loser deal, now he is way upside down and he can't even sell it. 

 there is no real guarantee on things ...it could be an $ 8k mistake, or $ 400k mistake, any warranty is only as strong as the company is.
 
« Last Edit: December 28, 2014, 04:10:28 PM by TonyDtorch »

Deano2002

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Re: 1st post. Shopping for a Class A
« Reply #29 on: December 28, 2014, 06:57:32 PM »
It sounds to me that it has been a good learning experience though.  With your comment that the "Next one will be..." it doesn't sound like it has ruined your MH dreams, but taught you a lot about what you want out of the MH experience for under $8,000.  Most people would call that a low cost education.
Well if there is a next one it won't be a fixer upper, thats what it taught me. Any money lost is not education, education should have been learned before hand on my part. I do know now what to look for now when looking at these coaches. You will not get much for not much spent
1989 Champion LaSalle 34' project

 

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