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Author Topic: Michelin Tires  (Read 5168 times)

tremor

  • Posts: 4
Re: Michelin Tires
« Reply #30 on: September 18, 2015, 11:36:42 PM »
Thanks you guys. It is being stored under cover and I kind of expected 7 years! I replace my boat trailer tires every 3 years and that one really hurts by not so hard on the wallet.

PARKMANAA

  • Posts: 1
Re: Michelin Tires
« Reply #31 on: September 19, 2015, 09:23:53 AM »
Two weeks ago I replaced my Michelin 24570R19.5 XRV tires with the same.
Removed tires were made 5th week of 2004; 11 1/2 years old.

They had very, very minor cracking near the bead; where you expect to see
it on radial tires.  Treads were worn evenly, and tires appeared to be in very
good condition.
Only reason I replaced them is because of age.  I typically replace Michelin
RV tires at 10 years, but let these run a little longer.  Have run Michelins on
several different types of vehicles and have yet to experience the horrendous
sidewall cracking I read about on this forum.

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: Michelin Tires
« Reply #32 on: September 19, 2015, 09:53:09 AM »
Quote
Have run Michelins on several different types of vehicles and have yet to experience the horrendous
sidewall cracking I read about on this forum.

Cracking may or may not occur - nobody seems to understand all the factors involved that cause surface cracks on the sidewall. Michelins seems more prone to it than other brands, but surface cracks in the sidewall are not necessarily a sign of failure anyway. The Michelin RV Tire Guide gives advice on when to consider cracking to be dangerous.

The aging issue is more complex than just cracking and a tire may appear fine on the outside but still have severely weakened sidewall structure or a tread area that is separating from the body. Sometimes these incipient problems can be spotted if the tire is dismounted and viewed from the inside, but not always.

It is certainly possible to have a tire last 10 years and I've seen other reports of 11-12 years. The point that we try to make here is that the risk of a major failure grows substantially with each passing year, and that risk involves more than just an inconvenient flat tire.  An analogy might be 70 year old men running the Boston Marathon. There are surely some 70-year-olds who can do that, but if a large and randomly selected group  70 year old men ran the Marathon, many of them would fail to complete it and some of them would fail catastrophically, e.g. have a heart attack and die. Merely looking at them at the starting line won't tell you much about which will survive and which will die.
Gary
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Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

 

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