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Author Topic: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood  (Read 8622 times)

tunie

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When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« on: July 07, 2015, 07:44:29 PM »
A man, full-timing in a white van, has parked a couple of times across the street from my house.  I was a little nervous about it because I don't know him but, I figured if he doesn't bother me, I won't bother him.  He just wants to get some sleep.  He left garbage last time he spent the night here, so I was going to say something to him about that because I hate picking up people's garbage.  Anyway, he parked Sunday night and came back and parked Monday night.  I live in a sort of rural setting with a nice view, so I understand why he likes to stay here over night.  This morning when I awakened, I saw a police car in back of his van and my heart sank.  I realized, my neighbor (who I don't like) must have called them.  Unfortunately, he parked directly in front of my neighbor's house, obstructing his view with his van.  When he parked further down the hill, there was no problem.  Anyway, I've called the police before when I thought a crime was occurring, but I've never called the police for someone who was sleeping.   Besides, where is he supposed to go?  His van is a bit of a mess, so he can't go to a campground.  I thought I'd offer to let him park in my driveway until he figures out where he can go but, while the police where here, he left.  About 20 minutes later, he came speeding up the hill, made a u-turn and sat staring at me though my kitchen window.  I looked at him (couldn't really see him well because of the distance) and then turned to go the door to catch him, but he took off again.  I realized, he must have thought I called the police and he was pissed.  So now, I'm worried.  I wish he was in one of the full-timing forums so I could meet him.

You know, if someone who is living in their RV, car, van, etc. parks in your neighborhood and you don't like it, why not just talk to them?  Find out how long they're going to be there.  Ask them if they need some help.  Give them some food, money, etc.  Why call the police?  Okay, I don't want 40 old vans parked in front of my house, but police?  I don't get it.  This man was just trying to sleep.  Where's the crime in that?  It makes me think about what might happen to me when I'm full-timing.  I may do just what this man did when I'm on my way from point a to point b.  I guess I will knock on doors to introduce myself and let people know how long I plan to stay and what I'm doing there.  It's a free country and, as far as I know, anyone can park on a public street for up to 3 days before they have to move their car.

Thanks for listening while I vent.  I just felt so bad that I couldn't help this man and also worried that he thinks I called the police.

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #1 on: July 07, 2015, 08:07:59 PM »
You are more compassionate that I.  Sounds to me like he was moving around the neighborhood to avoid too much attention, but living on the streets all the time. Not a guy making a brief overnight stop for some sleep before moving on, but a "squatter" in your neighborhood. And leaving trash in your yard, no less! Not my idea of guest who deserves my sympathy.

What would you say if you talked to him? Ask him not to throw garbage on your lawn? Ask him to move on?  Or tell him to use your driveway next time?

Sorry, but I can't get upset about this.

Also, be advised that many communities have laws against spending even one night in a car on the streets. If you decide to emulate this guy, expect to be visited by local law enforcement, probably well before morning.
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Tom and Margi

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #2 on: July 07, 2015, 08:28:24 PM »
There is a wide semantic gulf between the term "full-timer" (one who travels full time in an RV experiencing the scenic wonders our country has to offer after having lived a full and productive life) and a squatter or a homeless person.  I think you may have experienced one of the latter in your neighborhood, or are perhaps making plans to be one?  If you think as a homeowner  they deserve kindness, perhaps try to help them.  If, as a howeowner, you don't, call the police or sheriff.  In addition to possible security threats (theft), they might possibly be a public health (sewage) threat.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2015, 08:34:14 PM by Tom and Margi »

tunie

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #3 on: July 07, 2015, 08:38:43 PM »
I was just thinking about when I start full-timing.  What if I get caught without a place to park and it's getting dark.  I might stop into a neighborhood if I can't find a Walmart, but I get your point.  He doesn't look like he's full-timing because he wants to, but out of necessity.  I still don't think that's a reason to call the cops.  He arrives after 10 pm and leaves before 9 am., so he's trying to be considerate.  The garbage thing bothered me.  I live on a hill and the kids are always parking up here to neck.  As I've told them, I don't care what they do, but don't leave garbage.  I think if I'd asked him not to leave garbage, he would have appreciated that and probably would have apologized.  Anyway, I guess I feel bad because we can't just chase these folks around.  They have to be somewhere.  They have to sleep.  Not everyone can afford a 60K RV.  That said, I am worried about how angry he was and the fact that it was directed at me.  The man who called the police was hiding in his house, so I was the only one visible.  Still, I would have offered my driveway for a couple of days.  What can that hurt?

mikef

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #4 on: July 07, 2015, 08:51:41 PM »
If you would offer your driveway for a couple of nights, dollars to donuts, you would be taking legal action, after those days turned into weeks, or longer. Hardly my definition of a full-timer.

I have been full-timing for 7 years and never had the need to sleep on a street, in a residential neighborhood. Just takes a bit of planning.
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tunie

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #5 on: July 07, 2015, 08:56:16 PM »
There is a wide semantic gulf between the term "full-timer" (one who travels full time in an RV experiencing the scenic wonders our country has to offer after having lived a full and productive life) and a squatter or a homeless person.  I think you may have experienced one of the latter in your neighborhood, or are perhaps making plans to be one?  If you think as a homeowner  they deserve kindness, perhaps try to help them.  If, as a howeowner, you don't, call the police or sheriff.  In addition to possible security threats (theft), they might possibly be a public health (sewage) threat.

I understand.  I did want to help him but, because he's not "one who travels full time in an RV experiencing the scenic wonders our country has to offer", I didn't want to do it alone.  I should have talked to him when the police were here.  He could have led a full and productive life, but life got the better of him.  It happens.   I just started thinking about my own RV.  I'm planning to get an older RV that can fit a Doberman and a Staffordshire Terrier who can't be together.  It might be an 80's Wanderlodge, or a Boles Aero travel trailer.  I just began to wonder if campgrounds will turn me away because I'm in an old RV.  Will people look down on me because I'm not driving a 2015 100K Class A?  This is one thing I didn't research.

tunie

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #6 on: July 07, 2015, 09:11:25 PM »
If you would offer your driveway for a couple of nights, dollars to donuts, you would be taking legal action, after those days turned into weeks, or longer. Hardly my definition of a full-timer.

I have been full-timing for 7 years and never had the need to sleep on a street, in a residential neighborhood. Just takes a bit of planning.

I try to give people the benefit of the doubt.  I like to think that most people would be gracious in the face of someone offering assistance.  I don't know this man, but he wasn't causing a disturbance.  He's been quiet; just trying to get some sleep before moving on.  I just don't see how that deserves disdain from anyone.  I guess he's not a full-timer in the sense discussed in this forum, but he is full-timing in a van.  I'd be interested to know how he's doing it.  I've read about a lot of people full-timing in vans.  I can't imagine it for myself, but I'm intrigued at the mechanics of it; like people living in tiny houses.  Amazing.  That said, I don't want to risk my life and I don't know this person, so I guess I should stay away.  If I were a man, I'd approach him and offer to help.  I'd like to start a gofundme page for him.  I can't do that if I can't talk to him.  How sad is that.

Wow, 7 years and never got caught having to spend the night in a neighborhood.  Since I'll be group prospecting most of the time, I guess I won't be near neighborhoods, at least not in the beginning.  I do worry about getting stuck and having to spend the night in a place that doesn't welcome RV's.

tunie

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #7 on: July 07, 2015, 11:00:20 PM »
You are more compassionate that I.  Sounds to me like he was moving around the neighborhood to avoid too much attention, but living on the streets all the time. Not a guy making a brief overnight stop for some sleep before moving on, but a "squatter" in your neighborhood. And leaving trash in your yard, no less! Not my idea of guest who deserves my sympathy.

What would you say if you talked to him? Ask him not to throw garbage on your lawn? Ask him to move on?  Or tell him to use your driveway next time?

Sorry, but I can't get upset about this.

Also, be advised that many communities have laws against spending even one night in a car on the streets. If you decide to emulate this guy, expect to be visited by local law enforcement, probably well before morning.

Well, you were right on the mark. I found out that we have an ordinance that disallows sleeping in your car overnight on public streets.  Sooo, I've changed my tune. There are two Walmarts within 18 miles of here.  He can go sleep there.  I felt bad for him, but not anymore.

CLiNTon

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #8 on: July 08, 2015, 08:48:54 AM »
You'd do well to call the police and have these transients shooed away, many of them will empty their tanks in the gutters
and then move on. They've got no business whatsoever parking in anyone's neighborhood. There are RV parks for that sort of thing.
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DearMissMermaid

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #9 on: July 08, 2015, 09:58:52 AM »
Having had fabulously good times and some super tough times... I say show a little compassion.  The world needs more compassion.

Sometimes folks fall on hard times and coupled with the troubles comes incredible loneliness and often confusion. Sometimes folks just need a hand-up, not a hand out.

Heaven help us all if we accidentally fall on rough times and end up on the "homeless" list. There is this awful perception that all "homeless" folks are bad people. Sometimes the domino falls and it just keeps falling. The domino effect...

When I was terribly ill and living in my RV, I was parked in a very bad situation but extremely weak. A compassionate couple found out about my plight inviting me to come park on their land while I recuperated. I graciously took them up on their offer. Many days I was too weak to get out of bed, but they kept knocking on my door shoving soup and sandwiches at me. They went way out of their way to help me out and as I began to get well, I tried my best to repay them by helping them out around their house. I will never forget them or their kindness. I went to visit them awhile back and was extolling on their compassion; how it changed my life and gave me a "hand-up" to get well and get going again. They looked at me with total confusion and said "We did what any decent person would have done, what you would have done, what we hope someone would do for us if we were in a bad situation. It was no big deal!"

Well it was a big deal to me.

I guess karma finally caught up to them. I found out when a friend of theirs was dying, seemingly abandoned by his family, they nursed him at their home in his final days which stretched out to two years of debilitating illness. I visited them and helped out with his care to give them a break. A few months later, when he died, they found out he had redone his will leaving them his house (it was sitting empty in another town) life insurance proceeds and a huge pile of savings and stocks. When his "long lost" brother showed up to collect the estate... he was in for quite a shock.

Sometimes a little compassion never hurts.

Having said all that... I was once walking through a town carrying half of a sub sandwich. It was neatly wrapped, sliced in half, I had eaten half and was saving half for later. A woman in dirty clothes came up to me and I smiled. She asked me for money to buy food. I handed her my sandwich raving about how delicious it was and rattling off the ingredients.

Perhaps she was drug crazed (others said so later) but I gently handed her the sandwich. She threw it on the ground then jumped on it with her foot until it was a flattened mess. She yelled at me "I asked for money not food!" Then she stomped off. So sad to find out later , she was consumed by a nasty drug habit.

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Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #10 on: July 08, 2015, 10:27:24 AM »
Being down & out is worthy of compassion, but being down & out doesn't give carte blanche to leave your trash on someone's lawn. For me, that single item moved the guy from the "possibly deserving" category to "bum".   There is no excuse for that sort of thing - there are dumpsters everywhere. Besides, he's not going hungry - he is buying stuff and so has trash to dispose of. And he buys gas for the van.  I don't see that any compassion is called for here - the guy is just exploiting the community any way he can.

Quote
He arrives after 10 pm and leaves before 9 am., so he's trying to be considerate.

Or trying not to get caught doing something he knows is illegal. Is a burglar being considerate if he waits until you leave your home to break in?

Quote
A man, full-timing in a white van, has parked a couple of times across the street from my house

Again, that's NOT a person grabbing some sleep before traveling on the next day. He is hanging out in the area and changing his overnight spot daily to avoid being conspicious.
Gary
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SeilerBird

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #11 on: July 08, 2015, 11:24:12 AM »
I was just thinking about when I start full-timing.  What if I get caught without a place to park and it's getting dark.
There is an invention called the Internet which is full of lists of places you can legally camp overnight. There is a great website called Overnight RV Parking:

http://www.overnightrvparking.com/

which has 12,000 spots in their database you can access for about $25 a year.

If you are full timing then the odds are you won't get caught without a place to park. Full timers do not just wander around aimlessly and suddenly notice it is dark and time to park. Gas is expensive. Having a destination is a priority. You plan every move you make well in advance. Anyone wandering around aimlessly, sleeping where ever and throwing trash around is not a full timer, they are a bum.
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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #12 on: July 08, 2015, 01:04:14 PM »
We live in the rural preservation neighborhood outside of Las Vegas and now and again we catch folks "camped" out behind our property...we always stop, ask what they are doing, and ask them to leave. I haven't had to call the police...yet.

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TonyDtorch

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #13 on: July 08, 2015, 02:40:39 PM »
We all feel compassion for people that are having a a hard time.

But helping a bunch of homeless people can end up like feeding the pigeons .... Very soon you have a lot of birds and bird crap all over you.
« Last Edit: July 08, 2015, 02:42:30 PM by TonyDtorch »

Tinmania

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #14 on: July 08, 2015, 04:11:43 PM »
I do admire your compassion, Tunie, but this story has not one, but two, red flags. One is the aforementioned trash. There is no excuse for that. Worse, the fact that he returned after the police told him to leave and, apparently, glared at you. Sure it could have simply meant, "How could you do that??? :(." But it also, and probably more likely, a sign of anger and perhaps aggression, let alone jumping to an incorrect conclusion.

I'd be keeping an eye out the next few days.

I can practically hear the ominous Forensic Files theme playing as the narrator says, "Most everyone in Appleville liked, Tunie, but on that warm summer night somebody didn't." Okay that might be going a bit too far! ;)




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Rene T

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #15 on: July 08, 2015, 04:35:55 PM »
If it had been thirty years ago, I wouldn't have seen a problem with him staying overnight. And probably back then there wouldn't have been trash dumped in your yard. People have lost respect for other people. Don't feel bad. I would have been the first to call the PD.
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Jessy81

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #16 on: July 08, 2015, 04:52:22 PM »
Tunie, I just would like to say I think you are an amazing, compassionate, understanding and caring person, and if there were more people like you, the world would be a much better place. That being said, please be very careful when you think about approaching guys like this. It could be dangerous. You seem to have a good, pure heart, but not everyone does. He doesn't sound like a good guy. Leaving trash is inconsiderable and rude and shows what kind of person he may be. Coming back after the police sent him off is a red red flag.

I have lived in my RV for several months now for lack of employment and money to afford an apartment, but not once have I spent the night in a residential neighborhood. I go from Walmart to Walmart, not even staying at a particular Walmart more than once a week because I don't wanna be a bother to anyone. If there's no Walmart, I stay at truck stops, every once in a while at a campground when I need a dump station. I drive to rest areas on the freeways to leave my trash there in the designated boxes.

What I am trying to say is, even if life is giving you a hard time, there are ways to deal with it without bothering others... The fact that this guy chose to do the illegal thing and sleep in his car on a public street while leaving trash behind shows that he is not a good person and probably wouldn't appreciate your compassion.

By the way, the guy should be happy he only got the police called on him. I once parked my RV in front of a friends house while I had dinner with her, apparently one of the neighbors got pissed, and instead of talking to me, got his gun and shot my window! My RV was there for not even two hours. True story :-(  Have had to live with tape on my window for 3 months now because I couldn't afford the repair. So if you still wanna do a gofundme, you could do one for me please ;-)

Please be careful, also when you are traveling yourself! If you'd be traveling alone as a woman and actually end up having to spend the night in a place without Walmart or Truck Stop, it's a good idea to ask the local police where there is a safe place to spend the night. I did that once, and they offered me to stay on their parking lot :-)

Jessy81

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #17 on: July 08, 2015, 05:00:34 PM »
Forgot to say, yes, some campgrounds will turn you away with an older RV, but there's plenty that won't. Only happened to me once. And Walmart certainly doesn't care about what age your RV is. I see everything from 1970s to brand new RVs on Walmart lots. And as I said, if there is no Walmart (or one that doesn't allow RV overnight parking), look for truck stops or ask the police. Sometimes I have also stayed at restaurant or mall parking lots. Just gotta check with the manager or security if it's ok. If you explain them you are a woman traveling alone and couldn't find a place to spend the night, most places let you stay for one night. At least that has been my experience.
« Last Edit: July 08, 2015, 05:02:09 PM by Jessy81 »

Tom

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #18 on: July 08, 2015, 05:38:30 PM »
We were getting a different car parked outside our house every day, and the cars would disappear every afternoon/evening. We had no idea who they belonged to; I asked neighbors, but nobody knew. We live on a dead-end street, so it couldn't have been someone dropping off a car on their way to work.

After several weeks (maybe a couple of months), I happened to see a Highway Patrol officer taking a coffee break at Starbucks, and I asked him if he could figure it out and stop it. He came by, ran a plate, and said he'd call the guy. I subsequently found out that he never did call. But, one day I was talking to a neighbor and mentioned the cars; He said "Those are my son's (who lives in a nearby town); He's wheeling and dealing cars and has nowhere to store them, so he parks them on different streets". This was the only neighbor I hadn't previously talked to  :-[
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catblaster

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #19 on: July 08, 2015, 06:16:39 PM »
I have to add my story to this question of parking and sleeping overnight in a van. Several years ago my ex wife confronted our daughter about the need for her to sleep in her Honda Quest in my daughters driveway. They live in a gated community with a HOA that is fairly rigid. When my daughter explained the situation and disallowed her stay my ex became furious and left to sleep elsewhere.

My daughters family went on vacation a couple of weeks later and when they returned someone had put oil soaked newspapers around the house and set fire to several of them.  I guess the house would have burnt down if the perp had known how to light a fire properly. We have the feeling it was her mother trying to get revenge. One of the many reasons she is an EX.


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tunie

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #20 on: July 10, 2015, 03:13:43 PM »
Having had fabulously good times and some super tough times... I say show a little compassion.  The world needs more compassion.

Sometimes folks fall on hard times and coupled with the troubles comes incredible loneliness and often confusion. Sometimes folks just need a hand-up, not a hand out.

Heaven help us all if we accidentally fall on rough times and end up on the "homeless" list. There is this awful perception that all "homeless" folks are bad people. Sometimes the domino falls and it just keeps falling. The domino effect...

When I was terribly ill and living in my RV, I was parked in a very bad situation but extremely weak. A compassionate couple found out about my plight inviting me to come park on their land while I recuperated. I graciously took them up on their offer. Many days I was too weak to get out of bed, but they kept knocking on my door shoving soup and sandwiches at me. They went way out of their way to help me out and as I began to get well, I tried my best to repay them by helping them out around their house. I will never forget them or their kindness. I went to visit them awhile back and was extolling on their compassion; how it changed my life and gave me a "hand-up" to get well and get going again. They looked at me with total confusion and said "We did what any decent person would have done, what you would have done, what we hope someone would do for us if we were in a bad situation. It was no big deal!"

Well it was a big deal to me.

I guess karma finally caught up to them. I found out when a friend of theirs was dying, seemingly abandoned by his family, they nursed him at their home in his final days which stretched out to two years of debilitating illness. I visited them and helped out with his care to give them a break. A few months later, when he died, they found out he had redone his will leaving them his house (it was sitting empty in another town) life insurance proceeds and a huge pile of savings and stocks. When his "long lost" brother showed up to collect the estate... he was in for quite a shock.

Sometimes a little compassion never hurts.

Having said all that... I was once walking through a town carrying half of a sub sandwich. It was neatly wrapped, sliced in half, I had eaten half and was saving half for later. A woman in dirty clothes came up to me and I smiled. She asked me for money to buy food. I handed her my sandwich raving about how delicious it was and rattling off the ingredients.

Perhaps she was drug crazed (others said so later) but I gently handed her the sandwich. She threw it on the ground then jumped on it with her foot until it was a flattened mess. She yelled at me "I asked for money not food!" Then she stomped off. So sad to find out later , she was consumed by a nasty drug habit.

Life is goof.

What a lovely story.  I'm glad someone was there to help you.  It terrible to be alone.  You know, while I've never been homeless, I have been in -very- desperate situations.  Unlike your situation, no one came to my aid.  Because of that, I promised I would never abandon anyone if I had the means to help.  I knew what it felt like to be abandoned just when I needed someone the most.  I do what I can to help, which is why I was upset about this guy in the van.  He left before I had a chance to offer him my driveway.  After reading a few responses I thought that I probably shouldn't be so caring of someone who would leave garbage on my street, but you know, I'm sure if I'd said something to him, he would have picked it up.  I would never call the police on someone who's just trying to make it in life.  I mean, how about a little respect?  Why not just talk to him?  He wasn't causing any harm.  The neighbor who called the police also verbally abuses his wife.  He power washes his pink and grey driveway and washes down his white plastic fence, in the midst of our drought in CA and has his abundantly watered green lawn treated once per month by a lawn maintenance company.  To him, the guy in the van was subhuman.   In my opinion, he has that backwards.  I'd rather live next door to the guy in the van.  If he was dangerous, the police would have taken him away when they ran a background check on him. 

In the end, I decided to hit as many rv full timing forums as I could find to see if I could find this guy, maybe complaining about what happened, but no luck.

I wonder how many people kick him out when he's just trying to sleep.  Where does he go?  Where can he go if everyone kicks him out?  It reminds me of the ducks around here  A new small development destroyed a fresh water pond the ducks used to use for raising their young.  Because the scum ruined the pond, the ducks have their babies in backyards with pools.  I accommodate them.  My neighbor scares them away from his yard at every opportunity.  Where are they supposed to go?  No one cares.  All that matters to them is that they don't want to be inconvenienced.  I put bricks on the first step of my pool so the babies can get out when they're ready.  What's so hard about that?

I hope I find him.  I'd at least like him to know that I was not the one who called the police.

TonyDtorch

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #21 on: July 10, 2015, 09:12:15 PM »
If this event has awaken a compassionate awareness....then you should view it as a positive experience,  especially since you did nothing wrong.

go ahead and let the guy in the van go.... your compassion has plenty of other places that could use it.



( and don't forget a little compassion for your neighbors too... ;) )

IMO..
« Last Edit: July 10, 2015, 11:08:54 PM by TonyDtorch »

tunie

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #22 on: July 12, 2015, 11:13:25 AM »
If this event has awaken a compassionate awareness....then you should view it as a positive experience,  especially since you did nothing wrong.

go ahead and let the guy in the van go.... your compassion has plenty of other places that could use it.



( and don't forget a little compassion for your neighbors too... ;) )

IMO..

I guess you're right though, Heaven help my neighbor if he ever verbally assaults his wife in front of me  >:(

I'm moving on.  Thanks for the nudge  :)

Diesel Don

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #23 on: August 07, 2015, 08:23:15 AM »
Being down & out is worthy of compassion, but being down & out doesn't give carte blanche to leave your trash on someone's lawn. For me, that single item moved the guy from the "possibly deserving" category to "bum".   There is no excuse for that sort of thing - there are dumpsters everywhere. Besides, he's not going hungry - he is buying stuff and so has trash to dispose of. And he buys gas for the van.  I don't see that any compassion is called for here - the guy is just exploiting the community any way he can.

Or trying not to get caught doing something he knows is illegal. Is a burglar being considerate if he waits until you leave your home to break in?

Agreed.  This is a good point.  Its also worthy to point out he is most likely a drug addict and he needs help you can't give him.  I've had plenty of family experience with this and I caution you on how you handle this because it depends on the type of drugs he's on.  If he is a Cocaine or Crack or heroine user you could end up with an armed robbery on your hands or have your coach broken into when you step away.  The drug changes the mind in drastic ways and tries to get the user to do virtually ANYTHING to get the drug.

If its a meth user, you will probably have less issues with violence but you might see them doing some pretty crazy stuff in the lawn!  :o

Just be careful.  Its a fact that 95% of the homeless didn't just "Fall on hard times".  They have typically become drug addicts and need a LOT of serious help and you might not be about to start talking to a rational mind.  The drugs make them homeless through what it does to their mind.

Edit: Fixed quote tags.
« Last Edit: August 07, 2015, 08:33:40 AM by Tom »

Tinmania

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #24 on: August 07, 2015, 10:33:13 AM »
Its a fact that 95% of the homeless didn't just "Fall on hard times".  They have typically become drug addicts and need a LOT of serious help and you might not be about to start talking to a rational mind.
Do you have a citation for that 95% figure? I ask because in these times I would imagine a higher percentage did fall on hard times.




Mike

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #25 on: August 07, 2015, 11:30:09 AM »
I understand.  I did want to help him but, because he's not "one who travels full time in an RV experiencing the scenic wonders our country has to offer", I didn't want to do it alone.  I should have talked to him when the police were here.  He could have led a full and productive life, but life got the better of him.  It happens.   I just started thinking about my own RV.  I'm planning to get an older RV that can fit a Doberman and a Staffordshire Terrier who can't be together.  It might be an 80's Wanderlodge, or a Boles Aero travel trailer.  I just began to wonder if campgrounds will turn me away because I'm in an old RV.  Will people look down on me because I'm not driving a 2015 100K Class A?  This is one thing I didn't research.

My grandfather, a decorated retired Navy Vet, lived in a Van for the last 15 years of his life.  He was not homeless per se as he had a trailer in FL as home base, but chose that lifestyle as he enjoyed being outdoors, traveling, and visiting places.  He never, in 15 years, parked anywhere he was not invited, or was allowed to park.  Occasionally, he would tire and would sleep in a rest area, or even knock on a door to ask if the local property owner would mind if he spent the night in parked in an unobtrusive spot on their property (usually in rural farm areas). He was not a man of means.  I admire your compassion, but feel it is misplaced in this circumstance.


Side bar: I suspect your dogs might keep you out of more campgrounds than your RV (private ones at least).  Large aggressive breeds (as labeled by insurers, not me), are often not allowed due to insurance covenants on private campgrounds.
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Diesel Don

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #26 on: August 07, 2015, 11:51:18 AM »
Do you have a citation for that 95% figure? I ask because in these times I would imagine a higher percentage did fall on hard times.




Mike

I pulled it a few years ago from a facility that deals with drug issues and the homeless.  I don't have the link to the source at the moment but trust me....its that high.  Don't kid yourself and think that people are living on the streets because they lost their great jobs.  People dont end up on the streets in that way.  They would find somewhere else to go with family, friends, etc.  There are MANY other opportunities for "normal"people that fall on hard times besides under a bridge with rats gnawing at your ear at night.  People dont let them stay over because they have a drug problem and most of the times the user is not willing to get treatment yet because they have not experienced their "bottom". 

This is too dangerous for most people to take on.  Be careful.

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #27 on: August 07, 2015, 12:06:31 PM »
I pulled it a few years ago from a facility that deals with drug issues and the homeless.  I don't have the link to the source at the moment but trust me....its that high.  Don't kid yourself and think that people are living on the streets because they lost their great jobs.  People dont end up on the streets in that way.  They would find somewhere else to go with family, friends, etc.  There are MANY other opportunities for "normal"people that fall on hard times besides under a bridge with rats gnawing at your ear at night.  People dont let them stay over because they have a drug problem and most of the times the user is not willing to get treatment yet because they have not experienced their "bottom". 

This is too dangerous for most people to take on.  Be careful.
I used to work with the homeless and I think the 95% figure is way too low. More like 99%. If you don't have a drug problem and you aren't a grade A alcoholic, then getting help from your family, friends or social services is not that difficult. Neither is it a problem to find a job. If you are on the streets it is because there is no other option and no one else will put up with your crap.
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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #28 on: August 07, 2015, 12:07:45 PM »
I used to work with the homeless and I think the 95% figure is way too low. More like 99%. If you don't have a drug problem and you aren't a grade A alcoholic, then getting help from your family, friends or social services is not that difficult. Neither is it a problem to find a job. If you are on the streets it is because there is no other option and no one else will put up with your crap.

Yep.  Almost no reason for most homelessness.  Gotta dig in deeper and find the real reason.

Mc2guy

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #29 on: August 07, 2015, 12:16:05 PM »
Yep.  Almost no reason for most homelessness.  Gotta dig in deeper and find the real reason.

Mental health is a huge factor as well.  Drug use is obviously one element contributing to that, but serious mental health problems like schizophrenia and sever bipolar disorder can very often lead to homelessness as well.  My sister was a mental health counselor for out patient mentally ill in MD some years back, and something like 50% of her patients had been homeless in the last year.
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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #30 on: August 07, 2015, 01:49:45 PM »
I used to work with the homeless and I think the 95% figure is way too low. More like 99%. If you don't have a drug problem and you aren't a grade A alcoholic, then getting help from your family, friends or social services is not that difficult. Neither is it a problem to find a job. If you are on the streets it is because there is no other option and no one else will put up with your crap.
I don't work with homeless folks, but I do hire (and fire) for my dept. at work. Finding good help that can pass a random drug test is a serious issue. And yes, we have checked and our wages are inline with the rest of the area and a bit higher than some.
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SeilerBird

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #31 on: August 07, 2015, 02:10:43 PM »
I don't work with homeless folks, but I do hire (and fire) for my dept. at work. Finding good help that can pass a random drug test is a serious issue. And yes, we have checked and our wages are inline with the rest of the area and a bit higher than some.
How can the homeless afford drugs? And if they are homeless why not quit drugs and find a job?
I would like to apologize to anyone I have not yet offended. Please be patient and I will get to you shortly.
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Kim (skyking4ar2) Bertram

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #32 on: August 07, 2015, 03:03:26 PM »
How can the homeless afford drugs? And if they are homeless why not quit drugs and find a job?

If you understood addiction, as does my wife who is a Licensed Professional Counselor with a drug and alcohol specialty, you would understand addiction is not logical and addicts will always find a way to procure their fix.

And while some homeless people have addictions, many more suffer other mental issues that compound the problem.

If it was as simple a solution as you suggest, the problem would not exist.
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Diesel Don

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #33 on: August 10, 2015, 07:35:56 AM »
How can the homeless afford drugs? And if they are homeless why not quit drugs and find a job?

There are many other ways to "pay" for drugs besides cash.  You have to expand your options here...   Like the last poster said, sadly its a lot more complicated than you can imagine.  If you only knew what these chemicals will do to an otherwise functioning human mind its amazing.   I'm so blessed to have never been hooked on any of it.  I've seen more damage done by drugs over the years than I care to say.

SeilerBird

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #34 on: August 10, 2015, 09:49:12 AM »
There are many other ways to "pay" for drugs besides cash.  You have to expand your options here...   Like the last poster said, sadly its a lot more complicated than you can imagine.  If you only knew what these chemicals will do to an otherwise functioning human mind its amazing.   I'm so blessed to have never been hooked on any of it.  I've seen more damage done by drugs over the years than I care to say.
I don't have any trouble imagining it, I have been hooked on many things. I have unhooked myself from all of them. It is not hard if you really have the desire.
I would like to apologize to anyone I have not yet offended. Please be patient and I will get to you shortly.
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cadee2c

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #35 on: August 10, 2015, 05:48:05 PM »
In recent years its been discovered that almost half the homeless men surveyed have had brain injuries that occurred before they became homeless, a lot of them as children.  Childhood brain injuries result in learning disabilities which will result in lower income as an adult, which is an indicator for potential homelessness. A lot of the homeless also have mental illness such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder and similar disorders. The addictions more a symptom of these than the cause. 
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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #36 on: August 10, 2015, 07:10:49 PM »
If it had been thirty years ago, I wouldn't have seen a problem with him staying overnight. And probably back then there wouldn't have been trash dumped in your yard. People have lost respect for other people. Don't feel bad. I would have been the first to call the PD.

So true Rene.  It is a much different world today than it was 30 or 40 years ago.  I can remember as a kid (over 60 years ago) when a tramp (nice old word huh?), one who was riding the rails, came to the back door and asked mom if he could work for a sandwich.  He did some leaf raking (saved me from it) and mom gave him a full meal along with ice tea and a couple of buck to help him along.  He didn't hang around and moved along which was what 'tramps' usually did in those days.  What Tunie had was just a bum looking for a place to squat overnight (maybe in more ways than one) in between trips to the food kitchen during the day.  As I said, to me it is a different world we live in now.  Trust and compassion is not nearly as freely given as before - AND - for good reasons sometimes.
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CLiNTon

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #37 on: August 12, 2015, 11:54:16 AM »
...And poverty in this country is largely a choice in comparison to many other places around the world.
The government does an excellent job for the most part in creating and enabling income inequality via the welfare state.
There are also an awful lot of people who just don't want to work or take any responsibility for themselves whatsoever.

So the next time you find yourself in need to offer your sympathies to someone you THINK is down & out, make certain that it's well placed.
« Last Edit: August 12, 2015, 11:59:52 AM by CLiNTon »
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cadee2c

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #38 on: August 12, 2015, 04:19:11 PM »
Just for the record, some people do not agree with some of these statements.
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Ernie n Tara

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #39 on: August 13, 2015, 02:34:51 PM »
And that is a large part of the problem! Certainly there are disabled people and we should  try to support them, but when it gets to the third or fourth generation, it's time for tough love.

I've also tried to find EE's, who would at least show up, without notable success.  I even initiated a program at a major corp. where I was able to forgive failing drug tests and similar problems,  but ultimately had to give up due to consistent recidivism despite counseling and other support measures. No way to hold them accountable!!

And lest you think I'm a silly PC type, I grew up on the wrong side of the tracks, got a ninth grade education, left home and retired comfortably by taking advantage of the opportunities that are everywhere in this great country. Sympathy,  yes for some, but many others simply find it more comfortable to live off the rest of us!

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INTJohn

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #40 on: August 14, 2015, 06:36:45 AM »
Well this thread went from fulltimer being hasseled to a group dissertation on homeless peeps........ lol

My guess in op is that the guy is simply going thru a divorce and as is usually the case the guy gets tossed out of the house.......and he had to live someplace and he grabbed the old rv (cause she didn't want it) to crash in till stability returns.

That being said I'll move on to Ocean Beach San Diego: Peeps abound there who live out of their cars, trucks, vans rv's etc: some from short term necessity others just like it and so they live that way; others like me winter near the SD beaches. Peeps of all ages - from 18-20 year old university idealists in search of whatever to 70 yr old first generation 'surfer dudes' who love the beach ........ Its a very interesting lifestyle and I enjoy hangin with em when I'm there in the winter. Hell I'm one of them. while I park my trailer in one a the RV parks I frequently hang with em on the beach in my burb or my bicycle.

The parking rules at Ocean Beach are NO Parking in the Beach lots from 3AM till 5 AM which means you can hang there for 22 hours but not 24 hours...... Around 9pm to 2 am or so everyone typically moves out to find a safe spot to park for awhile - usually in an industrial area - as you will most likely get hassled by the POolees if you bunk up on a side street in a residential area.......... also if you're in that lot 1 minute past 3am not only WILL you get a ticket you might even get towed away. give the cop any crap whatsoever and you'll get a handcuft ride in a backseat.

Then sometime between 5am and 10 am we all return to the beach parking lot for the next beach daily ditto..........trust me on this - if you don't have a spot by 10:30am its going to take you a long while to find one and it probably won't be where you really would like to be.

Sometimes I just ride my bicycle to the beach with sleeping bag and - then I can bunk up there all night right on the beach sand - especially if I plan on enjoying
one of the often occurring campfire all nighters (there's ALWAYS at least 1 peep with a guitar).......... :^) U can sign me: Fulltimer who never has gotten hassled.

Thanx.........INTJohn

CLiNTon

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #41 on: September 02, 2015, 11:50:26 PM »
Much of the PC mindset seems to [erroniously] think that it's all the fault of society, and that they would have us elevate victimization to a point of total un-reality when in fact
most people are 100% responible for their own actions & predicaments.

There's nothing wrong with the fulltiming lifestyle provided one does so responsibly, instead of leaching off the kindness of other and taking advantage
of a stupid and erronious PC mindset that seems to permeate like the social disease that it actually is.
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oldme

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #42 on: September 03, 2015, 07:46:52 PM »
I agree with all Gary has said.
No need for me to repeat it.

PKworks

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #43 on: October 01, 2015, 06:11:50 AM »
Oh my goodness, I know I am late to this discussion but hope some will reread and see my little story that is the other side of the coin.
    My partner and I took care of my mother the last 4 years of her life but when she died there was no will. That said we were going to be homeless very quickly, you see the state of California paid us to take care of her so she could live out the rest of her life in her home where we also lived with her to care for her 24/7. We quickly had an open house yard sale and sold as much as we could, much to my grief at not being able to keep more memories but I am getting off track. We managed to get a MINI camper for my Toyota 4 X 4, cab over the cab (it was so small I could stand at the end of the truck open the camper door and wash the entire floor, I am only 5ft7in tall!! lol) This became HOME for us 5 cats and a dog...cozy to say the least!!
     My partner quickly got another job and I was out looking when some guy runs a red light and T-bones me almost flipping the truck and camper over (I had no insurance as my partner had not even gotten a first check yet) so no law suit or settlement  came NOT EVEN repairs (Now I go without eating to be sure I have full coverage ALWAYS!!)...the worst was that I got hurt...this was the beginning of the end of my vertebrae at L4 thru S1...so every day My partner (Pam btw) goes to work and I stayed in the camper caring for the animals in the parking lot of her job. At the end of the day we were in the same city as a friend so we would park on the street across from his place (across because his place was a 6 unit apartment building with no vacancies at the time) We never left trash, nor played loud music and the truck did look ok...YET someone called the police and we were harassed out of bed at about 1am to MOVE IT ALONG!! Back then and I am speaking this happened about 20 years ago (but people are still the same...some true Christians, some just grumpy always having a bad day. We didn't call ourselves "fulltime RV'ers" but to keep our chins up and hope alive we called ourselves the "High Class Homeless" cuz we carried our home in a truck not a grocery cart. There are always those that will not take a minute to think "Gee I wonder what happened that they have to live like that" Not one of my high school friends said "when I graduate I am getting the best shopping cart and put all my worldly goods in it and live on the street!"
     As for your worries about your older RV...some parks do want newer ones but then those parks usually charge way to much by the night anyway!! LOL I have found that as long as the outside looks in decent shape there isn't a problem, especially if YOU are nice to the management and show some manners too! Pam and I are happy to announce we have been together for over 30 years and this past May we finally able to get married LEGALLY IN ARIZONA!!! With the managements permission, we had our wedding in an RV Park we like ( See posting for Desert Sands RV Park Phoenix, AZ). Life is better and we got our dream to retire to full time RV-ers in a bit bigger rig (33 feet with slide out, only 2 cats but now 2 large dogs!! LOL) Good Luck to you and no worries, karma is great and goes on INTENTION!!
   
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RodgerS

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #44 on: October 01, 2015, 10:49:22 AM »
I sort of skimmed through this thread, but I think it was titled incorrectly. I think it should have been titled "When a homeless man in a decrepit van parks in your neighborhood...what should you do?" Calling him a full-timer is a misclassification.

Years ago I saw a homeless man peeing on the side of my house, but I was too far away to do anything. The next morning I waited and caught him doing it again. My solution was to turn the hose on him. He never came back.

On the other side of the coin, if someone parked their rv for the night near my house, as long as it was in reasonable condition, it wouldn't bother me at all as long as he/she was visiting for a few days or just wanted to get some sleep before getting on the road the next day. But don't leave any garbage behind.

I hope someone will ask me what my point was. Hint: might have something to do with nothing.
« Last Edit: October 01, 2015, 10:56:36 AM by RodgerS »
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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #45 on: October 05, 2015, 01:35:52 PM »
Quote
My solution was to turn the hose on him.

This is something you are proud of?
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RodgerS

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Re: When a full-timer is being hassled in the neighborhood
« Reply #46 on: October 05, 2015, 03:40:05 PM »
Yes. You come over to my house and you will get the same treatment if you behave in the same manner.

If you use the side of my bushes one time, I might give you a pass.

But if you have a motorhome, you better use your own pot.
« Last Edit: October 05, 2015, 03:44:29 PM by RodgerS »
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