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Author Topic: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England  (Read 13705 times)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« on: September 03, 2015, 11:07:29 PM »
Day 1          September 1, 2015      Custer, SD

Dean, Sherlock the Cat, and I have been off the road for two years, and this first week we have spent re-learning the RV routine.  We had only 2 weeks to prepare, as we expected Dean to have shoulder replacement surgery (brought on by him trying to be a weightlifter and hoisting a huge roll of carpet over his head to put it on a shelf in the garage).  It turned out that his tendons and bicep muscles are too shredded for surgery--years of over-doing.  Physical therapy was recommended, but he is too strong, even with the torn tendons and bicep.  He surpasses the exit criteria for PT.  So, he said, "Let's get going!"  Shock! 

We just got our Internet up today so I can start my log, and we are now enjoying our first scenic attractions. 

Our park is an easy 40-minute drive to Mt. Rushmore.  Last time we were here, it was snowing and Dean was on crutches.  This time, it was a beautiful low 80's day with a slight breeze.  Parking was  $12.  The NPS formed a partnership with a private company to get a loan to build the shady 3-story garage, which will soon be paid off, and the fees repaid (with huge interest, I'm sure) the loan.  Admission was free.

At the entrance, you can rent an audio tour, but we passed and don't feel it could have added much.  We saw the same information in 2 or 3 different places.  We entered through the Avenue of Flags which represent all 50 states and their date of admission. (Pic 1/5352)

We were awed by the presidents' carvings at the end of the Avenue of Flags.  I thought Borglum did an especially spectacular job on the eyes and expressions.  Eyes are so difficult that on many sculptures they leave them blank. (Pic 2/5363)  Words can't describe the sculpting adequately--you have to go see it.

Our first stop was the Visitor Center.  We enjoyed the 15-minute excellent movie describing each presidents' virtues and the carving of Mt. Rushmore.  They had attractive, informative exhibits.

There is a nightly summer ranger-led Evening Lighting Ceremony, but we chose to go elsewhere.  I had planned to go to the Heritage Village, and I forgot.  They recommend 10-30 minutes.  I'm going to make checklists in the future to make sure we don't miss anything.

I learned so much today, and I thought I knew a lot about these presidents.  I learned that Jefferson was a redhead.  Washington had a long nose--his is 21' long, and all the others are 20'.  Lincoln only had a beard during his presidency, and then, it was usually short, as depicted on the mountain.  A South Dakota historian was the first to suggest carving the mountain to lure tourists to South Dakota.

Of course, erosion is a concern.    Each year the NPS works on preventing water from accumulating in the cracks, expanding during the winter,  and crumbling the portraits.  They put a special oil in the cracks, and the NPS has put in a monitoring system on the 21 most critical ones. 

The NPS studied methods of treating cracks.  They fit the crack with foam backing rods and then use caulking guns to inject silicon sealant into the crack.  Then they sprinkle a little granite dust on the sealant so it blends with the rest of the mountain.

Timing our trip to Crazy Horse Monument was a challenge, and we did it close to perfect (for us).  Admission was $11 each and included everything except dinner.  We arrived at the monument just in time for the 5:30 talk and hoop dancing.  The 21-year-old woman gave us a little history, vocabulary, and an audience-participation demonstration on how to use hoops to make symbolic figures.  Her finale was a dance, starting with one hoop and building to 21 hoops, using her feet to fetch the additional hoops.  She used oval hoops to fashion a tail (?) or a snake (?)  She says we need to use our imagination to interpret the dance, but I'd like to see the true story of what we were seeing. (Pics 3 & 4/5397 & 5396.)

We ate at their Dancing Waters Restaurant adjacent to the demo.  I had a very good Native American taco (translation "Indian taco.")  Dean had a good burger.  I heard that their buffalo stew (tanaka) was excellent, also.  They offered extra sour cream, salsa, and free drink refills.  Prices were reasonable (taco was $10.29).  Service was outstanding!

The museum had excellent exhibits.  What fascinated me most were the smaller sculptures that the Polish artist, Korczak Ziolkowski, did as prototypes.  I didn't get a chance to go through their lovely gift shop, and if I were to do it again, I definitely would allow more time for that.

At 8:30, you can view the laser light show either from the parking lot or the patio where we saw the dancers.  The parking lot is the preferred spot.  We tried to get photos, but it's kind of like photographing fireworks in motion.

I heard disturbing stories of how they used their profits last time we were here.  They are funding an Indian University & Medical School (eventually), which now offers classes but not a 4-year bachelors and scholarships to outside universities.  Of course, they have maintenance of the beautiful cultural center and restaurant and parking lots, and they fund the carving.  I learned that they work on the Crazy Horse Monument Monday through Friday, weather permitting, 52 weeks a year.  However, the CHM wasn't noticeably more complete than when were here a few years ago. 

I didn't realize the magnitude of the project.  The head of Crazy Horse is bigger than all of Mount Rushmore. (Picture 5/5371) When Korczak's son, Adam, was a teenager, he was driving the bulldozer.  His brakes failed, and it sent over the side.  His dad saw he was okay, then told him, "You got it down there.  Now you get it back up here."  He had 10 children, and 7 are still involved with the monument.  It's their passion.   It will take another 2-3 generations to complete the monument.  They haven't even started the horse yet, but they have drawn it. (Pic 7/5373)   The original artist's  children and grandchildren are working on the monument now.  His wife, who is in her 90's still works on the board and speaks to raise money.

Staying at Broken Arrow Campground--$40, has everything, including stables for your traveling horse.  Very nice hosts.  Level, pride-of-ownership campground.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Ken & Sheila

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2015, 10:32:20 PM »
Great to see you on the road again. Have fun.
ken
Ken & Sheila
2009 Monaco Camelot 42 PDQ
2008 Jeep Liberty, 2006 Saturn Vue
Fur-ball kids: Ariel and Mia

Betty Brewer

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #2 on: September 06, 2015, 11:04:24 PM »
Watching  for your  next  entry!
Betty Brewer

see where we are

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2015, 12:00:46 AM »
Days 2 & 3      September 2 & 3, 2015      Interior, SD

We traveled on Sept. 2, ending with Indian tacos at the KOA for $7.50 each.

On Sept. 3, we set off for the Badlands NP early.  I had such pleasant memories, and again it didn't disappoint.  We stopped at the Cedar Pass Lodge and Restaurant thinking it was the VC, which was a short distance further.  I'm glad we did because we discovered their restaurant had Sioux (Indian) tacos that we decided to try for dinner.

The Badlands were amazing from beginning to end.  We started at the Visitors' Center learning about how the Badlands were formed, the flora and fauna.  The NPS had a good 15-minute film and great displays with explanations.  The rangers were very busy with hikers, and so I still have questions.  The exhibits described the various layers (Pictures 1,2,3,4/5458/5466/5492/5476) as they arose from the inland sea.  There were such bright colors, especially the yellow.  (Pic. 5/5480)  There is a 30 foot layer of volcanic dust from the west.  When I asked the ranger if these were the volcanoes as far west as Washington and Oregon, she said that it was the volcanoes that formed the Rockies.  Rangers always know far more than me, but I thought the Rockies were thrust mountains.

We were amazed at how much short very green grass we saw (Pic 6/5487).  In the distance, we saw several single buffaloes or pairs, rather than a big herd, up on steep green mesas, which made us wonder, "How did they get up there?" They had sheer drop-offs on the sides we could see.  The back side must have a less arduous trail.

Dean and I watched the raptors riding the thermals.  He claimed they were hawks, and I thought they were turkey vultures, when out of my window, what do I see?  A real turkey!  He was pretty, and Dean zipped out with his camera and got a great shot of him as he turned to look at Dean. (Picture 7/5472)

A little further on, there was a signed prairie dog town.  People continuously got closer and closer to one mound, not using good judgment.  Dean chose a different mound,  kept his distance, and had a conversation with this prairie dog who barked at him (Pic 8/5455).

We have seen beautiful sunflowers everywhere, but isn't Kansas the sunflower state?  It turns out that farmers in South Dakota are growing sunflowers for their oil, and the seeds are dispersed by the wind, supplanting the native wildflowers.  They are bright yellow, and pretty nonetheless (Pic 9/5428).

We returned to the Cedar Pass Restaurant, and I had the best "Indian" taco ever ($9.50).  Real Sioux make the dough from their grandmother's recipe.  Service was great, too!

Staying at Badlands KOA--$93.60/2 days  Very nice, spacious gravel pads, shaded, nice hosts

Sorry it's taking us so long to post.  We've forgotten how to do the pictures, and it's coming back gradually, but only with lots of time spent when we mistakenly delete things.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #4 on: September 07, 2015, 12:06:34 AM »
Pictures continued
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2015, 12:59:11 AM »
Day 5      September 5, 2015         Council Bluffs, Iowa

We made the 4-hour drive to Council Bluffs.  Finding the RV registration and parking was an hour-long process.  Only Caesar's could make it such an ordeal.  The registration should be at the parking area.  It isn't.  Getting to the park from the registration area is a convoluted process.  Dean was shown a map on the wall, but they don't have any maps to give out.  We ate at their crab leg buffet ($27 each).  The crab legs were delicious, but the overall buffet was very average.

Staying at Horseshoe Casino--$30/ FHU except sewer (dump station).

Day 6      September 6, 2015         Council Bluffs, Iowa

Today was a dud.  I should have known that the 90°+ weather would put all the animals into the shade and we wouldn't see them, but the Desoto National Wildlife Refuge would be a diamond in the migration seasons.  It has everything, including beautiful photography of all the animals we didn't see. 

Desoto is located right on the "Big Muddy," the Missouri River.  The visitor center was amazing.  There were hall after hall of beautiful displays with great explanations and history of a steamboat that ran aground.  There was a great 15-minute about the history of Desoto, which was very interesting and educational.  We looked out the observation window and saw a beautiful red-headed woodpecker and lots of cliff swallows, and I think, nuthatches.  The trails were handicapped-friendly, and the auto tour was well-designed.  But, the only live wildlife we saw away from the VC was a group of turkeys crossing the road.   Sorry, but they were quicker than my cameraman/chauffeur (Dean).

Staying at Horseshoe Casino--$30/ FHU except sewer (dump station).
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Betty Brewer

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #6 on: September 07, 2015, 11:00:14 AM »
Linda,
I am thrilled that you are back on the road.  Your narrative and photos make me feel like I  am there!  I  got a chuckle about  your cameraman/chauffeur and not being fast enough with camera.  I am not the driver and  I still miss shots .  The other day we stopped on he highway to let 3 small deer pass in front of us (a good and  quick decision on part of driver) and  I did not get one shot of the  " parade"  Guess I  was still watching for more deer to appear from the bushes on side of  road.

Loving the time you spend on photos and journal.
Betty Brewer

see where we are

Tom and Margi

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #7 on: September 07, 2015, 12:11:02 PM »
Linda - I, too, am so happy you are back on the road and sharing your adventures with us.  I look forward to reading each and every one of your posts.  Thanks for taking the time to share with us.

Margi

ArdraF

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #8 on: September 07, 2015, 02:50:57 PM »
Me Three!  It's great that you're back to traveling and I always enjoy your travel adventures, Linda.  I'm with Betty - always wondering why I didn't get "that" photo.  Have a great trip!

ArdraF
ArdraF
:D :D

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #9 on: September 09, 2015, 11:16:53 PM »
We've been having a great time in the trees, but no satellite reception.  Why is it that when we can't use our satellite, the park has either poor or no WIFI, and when our satellite is working great, the park has great WIFI?  Anyway, here is the first of our catch-up posts.

Day 4      September 4, 2015         Pierre, SD

We had an easy 3-hour drive to Pierre.  We unhooked the Jeep and scurried about 5 minutes to the capitol,  (Pic 1/5521) which is open until 7:00 until Labor Day.  However, since we had lost another hour by crossing a time zone, it was late (about 4:00) by the time we got there.  We could see the copper dome from afar, but it is oxidized.  We didn't have to go through any metal detectors or security, which is unusual. 

At the gift store,  the volunteer gave us lots of information.  We were impressed by the horsehair pottery (Pic. 2/5522)    They used horsehair in place of the straw that we mix with the adobe in the Southwest, but they fired the clay first at a high temperature to give the vessel strength.  Then it is fired a second time to just below red hot and the horse hair is gently laid on in strands.  The heat from the piece causes the hair to curl around it as it leaves a black carbon trail.  Although it is shiny, it is not glazed and is very porous, so you need to put a liner in it if you want to use it as a vase.  It is fabled to have come from ancient Indian tribes that wanted to preserve the spirit of their horses.  Unique!

South Dakota is very poor and ranks 50th in U. S. teacher pay, $32,000.  They pay everyone very little, so they have instituted a program for lawyers.  If a newly-admitted to the Bar lawyer will come work for the state for 5 years in a place they assign (usually an Indian reservation), they will pay all of their law school costs.  Currently, on the reservations, you don't have to have a law school degree or have passed the bar to be an attorney or judge.  They are trying to get similar incentive programs for doctors and teachers to get more qualified people.

South Dakota had a "Wild West" beginning as the Dakota Territory, in partnership with North Dakota.  When they were admitted as a state in 1889, they needed a capitol.  Pierre was the geographical center, but Huron was a population center and said that Pierre, being so far out west, would never be populated.  Being capitol would be a big economic boom.  When the vote was taken, Pierre won.  A year later, it was up for the vote again.  This time both sides bought drinks for voters, paid off their gambling debts, gave bribes, and gave away city lots. Pierre won.  In 1904, they decided to vote AGAIN.  This time the Chicago and Northwestern Railway wanted Pierre, and the Chicago, Milwaukee, and St. Paul Railway wanted Mitchell.  Both companies offered free rail passes to their cities.  Over a thousand people a day rode to Pierre.  And, again Pierre won.  And, at that point they began building!

The capitol is very utilitarian.  It is made of marble and cost about $1,000,000.  A Grand Staircase has hand-laid terrazzo floor tiles that were individually laid by Italian artisans. They have all of their symbolic murals in the rotunda, and the halls are generally quite plain, though some have oil paintings.  I liked their original water fountains with solid brass spigots and handles.  Originally, flowing water was not available, but a brass cup and bowl of fresh water was provided each day.  As running water became available, brass fixtures were added.  All the lamps all original or facsimiles of the originals and have been changed from gas to electric.  They did an extensive 10-year restoration in 1980, and they have restored it to the original as best they know it.  Just last year, they had all of the stained glass that's on the inside of the capitol dome removed, cleaned, and re-inserted.  This process took one entire year.

The assistant city clerk heard us talking about how and if we could enter the chambers of the State Supreme Court, and she showed up with keys.  She was fascinating, loves her job, is proud of her capitol, and really gave us a feel for the state and its problems.  We read in the guidebook that since 9-11 tourists can't go in the Supreme Court chambers.  (Picture 3/5523)  Sometimes we get lucky.   The S. C. justices hear every appeal that is made to them.  The most recent profiled a huge problem in SD, the  perceived discrimination and disrespect of Native Americans by the rest of the population.   A man was drinking beer at a stadium.  When he cheered excitedly at a play, some of his beer sloshed on two Native American children in the row in front of him.  Their chaperone claimed that the man had poured beer on the children and made racial statements.  The children testified that it was an accident and the man said no such thing, so he was acquitted.  They are very proud of the painting, "Mercy of the Law," hanging behind their chairs.  There are 5 justices, but only 4 chairs, because one of the justices was paralyzed in a diving accident and uses a wheelchair.

The third floor is the Legislative Floor.  They meet for two months, starting in the second week of January.  The House has 70 representatives.  They list the names of the counties they represent on their nameplates.  (Pic 4/5525) There are 53 Republicans and 17 Democrats. There are 18 women representatives.  The carpeting has been restored to an exact duplicate of what was installed in 1910, and all of the oak wainscoting and the oak desks have been stripped and refinished to new condition.  They still use the original offices and chambers today. 

The Senate has 35 representatives. (Pic 5/5529), 27 Republicans and 8 Democrats.  There are 6 women senators.  They have never had a woman governor.

The state seal is woven into the carpet at the entrance to the legislative chambers (Pic 6/5528).  It is self-explanatory.  In 1889 they entered the Union.  The state motto is "Under God the People Rule."  The pictures shows the importance of the hills, a river with a boat, a farmer, a mine, and cattle.

We didn't get a tour because the volunteer guides all took the holiday weekend off, so we were really fortunate to get some additional information from the clerk.  We learned more after we left from the Internet and guidebook.

The  nearby Cultural Heritage Center was chock full of interesting displays and information.  It was modern and clean.  Obviously, it had been designed and signed by a very talented historian.  Admission was $6, and we only had one hour to spend there.  Our receipt would have been good for admission tomorrow, but we didn't want to overstay at Walmart.

Staying at Pierre's Wal-Mart because all the campgrounds were full (Labor Day weekend).  They were very welcoming!  We shopped and bought nice, fresh produce.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #10 on: September 09, 2015, 11:18:23 PM »
2 more photos 
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

  • ---
  • Posts: 1195
Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #11 on: September 09, 2015, 11:22:39 PM »
Day 6      September 6, 2015         Council Bluffs, Iowa

Today was a dud.  I should have known that the 90°+ weather would put all the animals into the shade and we wouldn't see them, but the Desoto National Wildlife Refuge would be a diamond in the migration seasons.  It has everything, including beautiful photography of what we didn't see. 

Desoto is located right on the "Big Muddy," the Missouri River.  The visitor center was amazing.  There were hall after hall of beautiful displays with great explanations.  There was a great 15-minute about the history of Desoto, which was very interesting and educational.  We looked out the observation window and saw a beautiful red-headed woodpecker and lots of cliff swallows, and I think, nuthatches.  The trails were handicapped-friendly, and the auto tour was well-designed.  But, the only live wildlife we saw away from the VC was a group of turkeys crossing the road.   Sorry, but they were quicker than my cameraman/chauffeur (Dean).

Staying at Horseshoe Casino--$30/ FHU except sewer (dump station).

Day 7      September 7, 2015         West Des Moines, IA

We went into the casino for dinner last night and heard stories of golf-ball sized hail, lightning and thunder just a few miles away.  Fortunately, we saw a nice lightning show, and there was some rain, but not the downpour we'd heard about.  And, our coach didn't get dimpled!

The temperature decreased to 87° today, a nice change in the right direction.  Unfortunately, as the temp went down, the humidity went up even higher.  This whole trip has been hot and humid, and of course, our AC went out on the 4th day on the road.  Dean says we will have to replace the unit, and we hope to do that in Des Moines.

The trip from Council Bluffs was easy.  When we asked the Iowans about traffic on Labor Day, they said, "No problem, especially on the interstate."  If only our interstate (405) and (5) and (605) highways were half as clear,  we'd be ecstatic.  W

We went to a movie since all the other attractions we wanted to see were closed.  Their Cinemark 20 has Senior Mondays, and we only paid $6.15,  We saw "No Escape," a good movie.  As we entered our campground, a cute fawn bounced across the grass in front of us.  I've seen many deer, but never one who bounded with joy.

Staying at Walnut Woods State Park--$17, FHU, wooded, so we have no satellite reception, therefore, no internet or TV.  Dean had to dodge trees and took several realignments to get just perfect, which you have to be, but it's so worth it.  We LOVE our campground!  It is the first place to get Sherlock's seal of approval.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #12 on: September 11, 2015, 01:26:22 AM »
Day 8      September 8, 2015      West Des Moines, IA

How can this RV park be so full of nature, and yet so close to everything? 

Today we made a 15-minute drive to the Capitol. (Picture 1/5638).  The Capitol front is being remodeled and is covered with scaffolding.  My picture is from a postcard.

We had an amazing guide, Lisa.  In visiting lots of capitols, we have noticed that every state wants to be the ----est (superlative).  Des Moines has the largest gold dome in the United States, and it sparkles from a distance as you approach.  They used 23.5 K gold-leaf on it.  They have re-applied this gold leaf 5 times.  It takes 2 years and is very thin.  All the gold they used in reapplying gold leaf was the size of a baseball and cost $500,000. 

The bundles of wheat below the inner dome are also gold-leaf, as are all of the gold-colored things we saw in the Capitol, except the chandeliers, which are brass.  Many capitols, including Pierre and Des Moines, have worked very hard to restore their capitols back to the original, using hiatorical pictures and drawings.  Des Moines has 2 full-time architectural painters working year-round.  Part of the lottery profits is dedicated to continuing restoration.

The inner dome (Pictures 2, 3 & 4/5534/5535/5561) has a painting of a medal bestowed on Civil War veterans.  The man who was governor at the time liked the medal and ordered it painted on the inner dome.  Privilege of power?

In 1846 the capitol was at Iowa City.  It was moved to Des Moines because it was more centrally located at the convergence of the Raccoon and Des Moines Rivers.  There were no stories of bribes, etc., as in South Dakota.  Should they build it on the east or west side of the river?  People on the east side said they would donate the land, build the capitol for free, and rent it for $1/year.  But, they built a bare bones 3-story office building type structure with a dome.  So, the legislature built the new capitol at a cost of $2.8 million between 1871-1886.  Most of the work was done by day laborers.  They still use the same building today, except for the Supreme Court, which moved out in 2003.

The capitol is an all-brick building, but you never see any bricks.  They added limestone in some places, plaster, sandstone, marble, carved wood, and lots of scaliolla  (a special man-made marble that they could put ventilation tubes in).  All of the art is hand-stenciled in 14-15 layers.

In 1904, a worker was working inside a wall of the capitol, which was very dark.  So, he used a candle, and he accidentally set the House of Representatives on fire. The wall acted much like a chimney. Because the capitol was made of brick, they believed it was fireproof, so there were no fire hydrants.   A building engineer suggested that they should shut off the area and deprive the fire of oxygen.  And it worked!  However, after the fire was out, he slipped off a beam when he was checking the area above the governor's office.  He was the only fatality of the fire.

We next saw a large model of a battleship with teak decks. (Pic 5/5540) They are very proud of the USS IOWA and the Iowa-class battleships.  It is now a tourist attraction in San Pedro, CA.  It was used in WWII through the Gulf War,  FDR used it like Air Force 1.  It can shoot shells 26 miles away.  If they fire all the guns at once, it would require 52 tons of ammunition.  No one can be on the top deck when they fire the big guns because the whole ship suffers kickback of 25-30 feet!

This big round object is a radiator with a piece of the fake marble on its top. (Picture 6/5540 ) This heating system is still in use today.  When the legislature is in session, usually from January to May, the guides have to wear suits.  As winter turns to spring, they may have a hot spell.  But the radiators still go full speed ahead.  They can't turn the radiators off until they are sure they've had the last freeze of the year, so sometimes they sweat a lot!

Originally, there were 5 Supreme Court justices.  Their courtroom (Pic 7/5541) is really awe-inspiring.  It has a majestic chandelier.  We sat in chairs that date back to 1886.  In the early days, the justices came in for one week per month.  Their offices were in back and had Murphy beds.  They heard no witnesses,  They just used precedent and referred to their law books.  The wooden "bench" front is from one tree from the Dominican Republic.  It is truly beautiful.   All the wood throughout the capitol is native to Iowa, except the Supreme Court bench face.

The superintendent of construction, Mr. Finkbein, hired one master carver to carve the benchfront.  When he saw the carver, he said, "I wanted a man, and I got a boy."  He was 20, but his work was so fine that Finkbein kept him.  When the court was expanded to 9 justices,  he was hired to expand the bench by putting 2 more panels on each end, and he was 60 years old then.  The superintendent was very persnickety.  The pillars that were to hold up the inner dome were 1/16" too small, so he send them back.

In 2003, they moved into their own new building.  We saw pictures of it, and I thought it looked very plain and sterile.  Justices are appointed and then confirmed by the electorate at the next election cycle.  Now this room is used by the majority party of the House of Representatives for caucuses.  Committees also use it.

As we came to the main staircase, we saw 2 statues (Pic 8/5542).  The architect of the capitol, Alfred Pinknard, also designed the capitol of Illinois.  He had included these two statues at the base of the staircase, but Illinois rejected these because they said they were too risque'.  He offered them to Iowa, and they liked them.  They like to think of themselves as being more open-minded.

The walls of the rotunda have very expensive glass mosaics that were made in Italy.  (Pic 9-14/ 5545-5550).  They look like paintings from afar, but they are made of tiny glass tiles.  They symbolize the 3 branches of government, defense, charities, and education.  The feet of one seem to turn as you walk by it, and another one's eyes follow you as you walk by.  They also have a magnificent westward movement painting (Pic 15/5544) with pioneers' faces hidden in the cornstalks.

The law library was magnificent.  It is 5 stories tall!  (Pic 16/5552) They used a dumbwaiter to transport the books. (Pic 17/5553)  The chandelier is an original (Pic 18/5554).  I felt that it was a very special place.

There are two houses in the legislative branch.  The House has 100 members.  They have no offices at the Capitol, except the leadership.  Each member has his own desk, and his aide uses the top of the file cabinet next to him/her as a desk.  (Pic. 19 & 20/5556-7).  There is no kneehole, so it has to be uncomfortable.  Aides only get paid when the legislature is in session.  University students carried the desks out in the fire, and they are still in use today.  Bills originate in the House, and the Senate must ratify them in the same form.  The governor then signs or vetoes.  A 2/3 vote in both houses is necessary to overturn the veto.

Women are not well-represented.  There has never been a woman governor.  27/100 representatives are women, and 7/50 senators are women.  This year, Iowa has their first female at the national level; she was elected to the U. S. House of Representatives.

The Senate is very similar to the House.   It does have its original chandelier, and is a little fancier.

When we came back to our RV, Dean stopped at the hosts' trailer, and I got to watch a marmot enjoying a walnut snack just about 5 feet from the Jeep.  Squirrels with bushy red tails abound and love the walnuts. 

Staying at Walnut Woods State Park.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #13 on: September 11, 2015, 01:29:23 AM »
More pictures
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
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2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #14 on: September 11, 2015, 01:34:35 AM »
More pictures (I liked this capitol a lot--so much I'm going to do a short write-up on Tripadvisor!)
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #15 on: September 11, 2015, 10:15:56 PM »
Day 9      September 9, 2015      Amana, Iowa

We set out early because the Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge was on the way to Amana, and they had big rig parking.  Their visitors' center has a world-class set of wildlife exhibits.  The center itself is architecturally beautiful and overlooks a tall grass prairie.  There are many observation areas, but it was unseasonably hot so animals weren't out and about.  The creator of their exhibits created an inventive, multi-sensory series of models of about 15 prairie animals. (Pic. 1, 2, 3/5564, 65, 66). We read facts about each animal, and we could feel their fur.  Then we walked through a gopher tunnel  (yes, gopher, not prairie dog) and learn about how they live in their multi-roomed tunnels.  The focus was on restoring the prairie to its original condition with native flora and fauna.  There was a quiz on a computer-like machine.   

There was a 5+ mile-long paved trail through the refuge.  Some areas were butterfly gardens, planted with milkweed and other plants that monarchs like, and attracted other flying beings.  I think these are called bee flies. (Pic 4/5573) We saw monarchs, but Dean's camera battery died, so we only got half a picture.

We took the auto tour, which took us back to the freeway.  We didn't see the elk herd, but bison blocked the road and created quite a dust storm when they wallowed at the side of the road. (Pic. 5, 6, 7/5576, 85, 80).  After performing for us, they took their calves and left, camouflaged by the tall grass.

This was, by far, the most spectacular NWR we've ever seen.  We've been to others with more variety of species, but they gave anyone who took the time to read and explore a great understanding of the tall-grass prairie and its inhabitants.

Stayed at Amana Colonies RV Park--$15/nt. with Passport America, 50 amps, FHU, big-rig and satellite friendly.  Quiet, except for honking Canadian geese who flew over starting at 5:00 A.M. and happy, loud-chirping birds. 
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #16 on: September 11, 2015, 11:57:12 PM »
Day 10      September 10, 2015      Amana, Iowa

Today we went to visit the Amana Colonies, a religious community where everything was shared.  It started in 1714  in German when these "Inspirationalists" broke from the Lutheran way of life.  They felt that certain members had been "inspired" as a vessel through whom Jesus spoke.  Members of the group took notes on everything they said.

As the differences in beliefs became more pronounced, they refused to send their children to church schools, swear oaths, and attend the Lutheran Church.  So they formed communes where they could live together.   Society became more and more hostile toward them. They were imprisoned, beaten, and ostracized. 

By 1843, the situation was not tolerable, so they moved to Ebenezer, New York, where they thrived.  They needed more land as they grew, but New York land was too expensive, so they bought land in Amana (meaning "remain true"), Iowa.

In many ways they were like the Amish, though their beliefs are entirely different.  They both immigrated from Germany at the same time, they both start with "AM", and they both were very religious and persecuted in Germany.  They both believed that being "plain" was good,  Their church had no steeple or stained glass windows, just a simple building with wooden benches.

They sent their children to school 6 days a week until they graduated from 8th grade.  They were then assigned to a job by the church elders.  A few boys were sent to college to become doctors, dentists, and teachers.

Women could not marry until they were 21, and men couldn't wed until they were 24.  They would go out on dates, usually on Saturday, but sometimes on weekdays.  When they decided to marry, they went through a one year separation when they couldn't see each other.  On the wedding day, which was always a weekday, the bride wore black or brown, and only a few close family members came.   There was no processional, ring, attendants, music, just a lot of praying and a simple, "I do."  Then they went to a lunch with closest friends and family, and then there was a big long party at the bride's parents' home, where the wine and beer flowed.  When the party was over, the bride went into her house, and the groom went to his house.  They couldn't see each other again until they moved into their home one week later.

A communal  kitchen served all members 3 meals a day and a mid-morning snack and a mid-afternoon snack.  The men sat at one set of tables, and women and children sat at another.  There was no music or talking.  They had 15 minutes to eat their meal, which I found contradictory to their supposedly "relaxed" lifestyle.

As they prospered and gained new members, they grew from one colony to 7 colonies.

They went to church 11 times a week--once each evening, with extra services on Wednesday and Sunday.  They still have services in German, and some of the colonies have them in English.

These people were craftsmen, and they specialized in woodworking (especially furniture), delicious smoked meat, beer, wine, and food products, and making quilts and woolens.  They purchased land in Homestead when they  found out that the railroad would be making a station there.  This facilitated their transporting of their goods.  Their quality products were prized.  They were competing with products being mass produced at the time of the Industrial Revolution, so their products had to be superior because they cost more to produce.

They found themselves struggling when the Depression hit.  Children were moving away.  People weren't buying their prized products.  So, in 1932, they decided to give up the communal living and form a corporation.  Each person received shares in the corporation, based on how long and active they had been.  They could use these shares to buy homes, etc., and the corporation kept ownership of some things and paid members dividends.  Most people, including the youth, stayed in Amana.  But, they have married others, and now few of the young speak German.

We visited their shops.  My favorite was the woodworkers' furniture and clock shop.  They make the clocks in Amana, except the cuckoos, which they import from Germany.  They only sell U.S. made products, and most they make on site.  I enjoyed their bedroom suite, rocking chairs,  jewelry boxes and the sayings on their plaques. (Pic. 1, 2, 3/5601, 5599, 5600).

We visited the museum and saw a short film of their history.  I actually learned more by just talking with the people working there.  They had displays of the phones and switchboard they used.(Pic.4/5602) and pictures and relics showing their life style.  They had a separate house that they had saved to show what life was like, but I don't think it was much different in furnishings than other Iowa homes of the same time period.

Meanwhile, back at the RV, Sherlock bounced from chair top to dashboard, to the open door, as he was entertained by his friendly birds (Pic 5/5613), honking Canadian geese, and passersby.  Can anyone identify these?  They remind me of sandpipers, but they're in the wrong habitat.

We ate at the German restaurant Ronneburg, and I had the jagerschnitzel.  Dean had a hamburger.  It was good, but lukewarm, just an OK meal.  Another group of three who were leaving thought their meals were outstanding.

Stayed at Amana Colonies RV Park--$15/nt. with Passport America, 50 amps, FHU, big-rig and satellite friendly.  Quiet, except for honking Canadian geese who flew over starting at 5:00 A.M. and happy, loud-chirping birds. 
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #17 on: September 12, 2015, 12:13:11 AM »
Day 11      September 11, 2015      Angola, Indiana

We drove 393 miles of easy freeway.  We love paying $2.33/gallon for diesel!  Regular gas is very close to that, also.  We don't love the tolls.  It isn't the cost--it's having to hang out the window to reach the credit card slot or pick up the ticket.  Also, one was marked Right Lane for oversize vehicles, so Dean headed to it and ended up exiting the interstate--poor signing.

We ate at Ruby Tuesday, right next to the WalMart, and loved it.  I think they have the best salad bar ever!

Staying at Walmart--only one other RV here, on the other side of the lot, not where they wanted RVs to park.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

ArdraF

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #18 on: September 12, 2015, 05:33:05 PM »
Very interesting about the Amana Colonies and how it all evolved.  Courtship and marriage was certainly unusual.  It seems they were a little more willing to adapt modern items, such as telephones.  To this day, when you drive around Amish and Mennonite areas of Pennsylvania, their homes do not have telephone or electric lines going to them.  One of my cousins lives in eastern PA and they had a house fire.  Their Amish friends were all willing to come help them rebuild with the one condition that someone would have to come pick them up and take them home because they don't drive cars.  Also she told me the young people go into town and use cell phones.

ArdraF
ArdraF
:D :D

Ken & Sheila

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #19 on: September 13, 2015, 08:44:14 AM »
I believe the bird in your picture is a killdeer.


Sheila
Ken & Sheila
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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #20 on: September 13, 2015, 10:21:24 PM »
I believe the bird in your picture is a killdeer.


Sheila

Thanks.  Now I can look it up.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
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2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #21 on: September 13, 2015, 10:31:20 PM »
Very interesting about the Amana Colonies and how it all evolved.  Courtship and marriage was certainly unusual.  It seems they were a little more willing to adapt modern items, such as telephones.  To this day, when you drive around Amish and Mennonite areas of Pennsylvania, their homes do not have telephone or electric lines going to them.  One of my cousins lives in eastern PA and they had a house fire.  Their Amish friends were all willing to come help them rebuild with the one condition that someone would have to come pick them up and take them home because they don't drive cars.  Also she told me the young people go into town and use cell phones.

ArdraF

Funny thing--I thought of you when I wrote up the capitol in Des Moines and the Amana Colonies.  The Amish were much less isolationist.  The Amish rules vary greatly and are established by each congregation.  Some allow a telephone booth, as long as it is 100 feet from the house.  When we were in Indiana, we had a quilt made for us by an Amish woman, brokered by a Mennonite.  He told a story of how he paid her by how much thread she used.  After she finished a quilt, he paid her.  Later, she found some thread that she hadn't used, so she walked over 2 miles to his home to return the thread and the extra money instead of just waiting for next time an order was placed, as I might have done.  Imagine his shock when visiting in her home, and a phone in the closet rang.  She was very embarrassed!  So, it isn't just the teenagers who use the phones now.  So many of them have had to go out and work that they now get special dispensations to use electric tools, etc. in their jobs, but they are totally off the grid at home.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #22 on: September 13, 2015, 10:33:44 PM »
Day 12      September 12, 2015      Erie, PA

Sometimes we ask, "What else can go wrong?" , but we really know it could be a lot worse. 

What went right--We didn't get lost, and it was freeway all the way. 

What went wrong--Dean tried to install our CD for East Coast navigating, and he can't get the West Coast disc to eject.  He spent 30 minutes looking through paperwork, studying the manual, and calling Airstream.  He found the number, and was irate when no one answered because they are open until 7:00 PM our time.  It was with a heavy heart that I reminded him that it was Saturday, and they only work 5 days a week.  It rained heavily all day, and our windshield wiper mechanism (not the blade) needs to be replaced, and everybody is "booking fall appointments now" and their calendars are full until mid-October.  This one was Dean's fault, though, because he should have delayed the trip and had it repaired before we left.  As he said, "But, it was in the 90's and not raining then."  When we arrived in Erie, it was a cold, windy, rainy 57°, and our heater didn't work.  Dean had to go out into the rain to diagnose it.  We did get lucky because all it needed was fluid.  Because of the storm, we have no TV or Internet.  When we stowed the RV 2 years ago, we had no leaks.  Today, we discovered we have 2 leaks, one by each of the skylights.  Dean will have to go up on the roof to repair them, so we're using towels for now, but....he has come down with the flu this evening and can't keep food down, so he definitely shouldn't be up on the roof caulking or whatever else you do.  We had a romantic dinner planned for the #1 restaurant in Erie, but rather than getting soaked taking the toad off and re-hooking it up, he opted for chili, which didn't work out well at all.  I love my Walmart Reviews app (Allstays), and it said we could stay on Ridge Rd., in Erie, PA.  I called, and they said no way--it's heavily patrolled by the township and they give expensive tickets.  At least, I did find another one nearby.

Tomorrow is projected to be sunny.  We're hoping our list of what went right will be very long.  RVing sharpens one's problem solving skills!

Bundled up and staying at the Downs Drive Walmart in Erie, PA.

Day 13      September 13, 2015      E. Syracuse, NY

Much, much better day, but it was overcast, not sunny.  We had some light rain and lots of wind.  Easy drive, and only 200 miles to Albany tomorrow.

Still bundled up in 50's weather at a different Walmart.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #23 on: September 22, 2015, 08:26:02 AM »

Day 13      September 13, 2015      E. Syracuse, NY

Much, much better day, but it was overcast, not sunny.  We had some light rain and lots of wind.  Easy drive, and only 200 miles to Albany tomorrow.

Still bundled up in 50's weather at Walmart.

Day 14      September 14, 2015       (Albany), Schenectady, NY

We traveled on good roads.  Dean isn't feeling well, so we stayed in.

Arrowhead Marina & RV Park--$30.60/night, W & E only, forested, no satellite, free Wifi by office

Day 15      September 15, 2015      Schenectady, (Albany), NY

Dean was sick, so we decided not to go into Albany.  I ran errands to get the 1 available bottle of boiler anti-freeze  to get our heater going.  Albany RV was the only place within 300 miles that had it, and I had to get Imodium for Dean.  I had to go about 30 minutes to Albany RV, and I swear that Dunkin Donuts clone themselves.  I thought I'd pick up a salad or sandwich at a drive-thru and didn't see any (Later when Dean was driving, I did, but my focus was the crazy New York drivers).  When I got near the RV park, I went through the Dunkin Donuts Drive-Thru, and I asked, "What is your healthiest, or least unhealthy, item on the menu?"  He replied, "Oh, the egg whites on flatbread!"  Yuck!  Sounded awful, but I'd asked, so I felt obligated to order one and I added (for 10 cents more) bell peppers and onions.  Worst, most tasteless sandwich I've ever eaten, and I should have asked for 10 servings of bell peppers on it so I could at least taste some flavor.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #24 on: September 22, 2015, 09:15:43 AM »
Day 16      September 16, 2015      Arrowhead Marina & RV Park (Albany)

We started early for the first tour of the Albany Capitol at 10:00.  Then we drove in circles--between 2 GPSs that went crazy, one-way streets, pedestrians that darted from between cars, and misinformation when I called the Capitol, we found it eventually, but no parking (which the guide had said would be available, no problem) because it was the 50th Anniversary of the Concourse designed by Rockefeller. However, they had reduced the parking by 50% by making one whole side of the streets around the capitol "NO PARKING."   In our wanderings, we came across the New York State Museum, which was also on our list, so we parked in their lot for $5 and decided to do the Capitol on another day.

The first section was a series of impressive,  enormous dioramas of the animals that had been in New York for hundreds  of years, but which man made extinct within a few decades. (Picture 1/5639)  They were truly magnificent, but the lighting cast a weird yellow hue on our pictures.   One hunter/trapper  wrote in his diary that he was here for 9 years and sold 800 beaver pelts each year he was here.   Extinct animals include the Canada lynx, wolverine, mountain lion, timber wolf, and elk.  These were followed  by dioramas of animals still present today. 

I intentionally avoided the 9/11 display area because I get too emotionally involved, but the next display we came to was the second WTC Family Trailer that was provided to the families of 9/11 victims to give them a private space to view the recovery and reconstruction operations.  The original large trailer is at the Smithsonian and made several moves as the recovery progressed, and was eventually replaced by this one.  Family members moved items from the original trailer, and it was covered by posters, flags, pictures, and mementos--totally mesmerizing as I felt their grief.

I skipped sections that were of no interest to me, and was amazed by the Earthquake section.  They had an earthquake in 1944 of 5.8 magnitude which was felt throughout New England, Michigan, Ohio, Delaware, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. It caused $2 million damage and wells went permanently dry.  They had several other good shakers before and after, and they don't know why they occur.  They are not at an intersection of tectonic plates.  One hypothesis is that there were previously existing, very old weak zones in the earth's crust.

The fabulous Native American exhibit areas had two large-enough-to-live-in homes, one a longhouse, and another a reed, domed structure.  New York has the 3rd largest population of native Americans east of the Missouri River, and 75% of those are descendants of the Algonquin, who were here 500 years ago.

I overheard others talking about going to the nearby Capitol via the Concourse, and I knew the tour times, so we took off.  We rode the elevator down to the basement, where it opened onto the Concourse, a long, wide hallway filled with stores, places to eat, and paintings.  At the end is a visitor center, where you sign up for tours of the Capitol with Marvin, a great, knowledgeable guide.

We passed through a rigorous security check, which is no wonder considering continuing security plots being discovered.  This is our most security-conscious capitol of the 40 we've visited.  Usually we get to see inside the governor's office, but it is marked in no way, and they won't even tell you where it is..  However, they have a state policeman on duty, looking like a guard, with a large desk area in the hall on the second floor, so you kind of have to assume that the governor's office is nearby.

This is the second capitol.  The first one was used from 1809-1883, and was the City Hall for Albany, also.  It was just too small.  They built the new capitol up to the old capitol's back door.

The capitol doesn't look like a capitol.  It has no dome, although one was originally planned, and is extremely large---they say the largest in the US and even larger than the US Capitol.  They went through 5 architects before they got it built. It took 32 years to build and cost $25 million.  It is estimated that it would cost 1.5 billion dollars to replace it.  It was voted 7 times by the Smithsonian as the best Senate chamber in the United States.   It was extensively refurbished in 1977, and most of it is reproductions of what was originally there.  They have been constantly renovating since 2000.

The architect who made the first plan promised to complete it in 4 years for $4 million, the same as in Ottawa, where he just completed a capitol.  After 10 years and $10 million, only the 1st floor was complete.  The soil was hard to build on because it shifted.  New York had lots of money because all commerce at that time came through New York City and the taxes they paid were used to build the capitol.

We went up to the 4th floor to view the 3rd floor Senate from the gallery.  They don't allow visitors on the Senate floor, even when it's not in session.  There is a large hand-carved ceiling in the Senate. (Pic 2/5640)  There were several unique features.  Look for the  school desks at the front, between the President of the Senate (lieutenant governor)  and the Senators in Picture 3/5645.  These are occupied by photographers and press, who sit facing the Senators. Seats for the pages are along the wall have red Spanish leather, which was used a lot throughout.

 None of the fireplaces in the Capitol are functional.  They have no chimneys.  There are 2 in the Senate (Picture 4/5646).  They are 6' x 6' x 6' and are totally soundproof.  Senators go inside the fireplace to have secret conversations because  the acoustics in the Senate so great that they don't need microphones to be heard. There are chairs inside the fireplaces for senators taller than 6 feet.  They vote orally aye or nay.  There are 63 senators, 32 republican, and 31 Democratic, and only 11 women.  Five of the Democrats broke away to give Republicans extra votes they need in return for getting more Democratic bills onto the floor.  They are called the Independent Democrats, and they sit apart from everyone at the back of the Senate. 

All 213 members meet on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, from January through June.  Special Committees meet on Thursday.  Every Friday everyone MUST go home to be available to the voters, so the voters don't have to travel to Albany.  They all make weekend appointments.  Voters can watch every session of both houses on the Internet and Cable TV.  Their travel is paid for by the state.  Their base salary is $79,000, as well as a great health plan, free meals when they are in chamber, and the state pays part of their lodging when they are in Albany.

The Senate lobby floor has tile that has the color baked through the stone instead of being glazed and  is made in England still today (Picture 5/5647).  There is a huge wall of a 24K gold-leaf  frieze above the Senate, which I think looks gaudy, yet plain, a little ostentatious.  Originally it was embossed Italian leather, which I think was probably much prettier.

They are proud that there have been 4 presidents from New York--Van Buren, Cleveland, and both Roosevelts.

There is a Million Dollar (Great Western) Staircase made of sandstone between the 3rd and 4th floor. (Picture 6/5650),  I didn't care for its dull, stained stairs.  There are carved faces of 77 famous people into the staircase.  Grant (Picture 7/5654) and Lincoln (Picture 8/5655) are at the top of pillars.  They brought 600 carvers from Italy and paid them $5/day.  Most families couldn't earn $1/day, and these carvers worked 6 day weeks.  They were considered rich.  They also solicited visitors to the staircase, who paid them to add their portraits to the carving.  There are 1000 unknowns, and of course, the carvers carved their own faces into it, too.

The Senate Lobby seating is inviting (Picture 9/5656, and was once used by senators to converse with lobbyists.  Now they meet behind an open-barred gate at the entrance to the Senate. It weighs 3000 pounds and is perfectly balanced.  The guide made it open with a push of one finger.  It is open-barred so the public can observe the senators making deals, but is too far away to hear.

We actually got onto the Assembly floor.  There have been 3 different ceilings, including the largest attempted vaulted ceiling.  They had carved the base ceiling out of oak, but there were recessed parts, which were supposed to be made of oak, too.  However, one day an assemblyman came in and found a ceiling piece the size of a bowling ball on his desk and discovered that it was made of papier mache'. They tried to repair it for 3 years, and they took the firm to court.  However, when a fire raged through the Capitol, the ceiling saved the building because the papier mache' soaked up water.  This is the largest room in the Capitol.

Members of the Assembly have placed flags on their desks, noting by rainbow flag if they voted for the same sex marriage act, and noting their patriotism with the American flag, and noting their family's or spouse's heritage.  (Picture 10/5657)  There are 36 women.  They have 150 members and electronic voting.

On the  2nd floor there is a beautiful State Seal (Pic. 11/5662).  It shows Lady Liberty, Lady Justice, 3 sets of mountains--Adironacks, Catskills, Allegheny,  an American eagle at the top representing New York as the #1 trading city in the world, and a ship from England and New York showing the importance of trade.   This is the Governor's floor.  Current Governor Cuomo made it a project to get all the governors' portraits out of storage and install them in the Hall of Governors with blue plaques telling their historical accomplishments.  Only one of the paintings was paid for, the first governor, George Clinton.  In 1804, he was the first elected vice-president of the US.  He served under Jefferson and Madison.  It was interesting that at that time it was possible to have a president and vice-president of different parties.

The original elevator used steam for propulsion, and it was in the same beautiful carved place that it is in today.  The elevator has gorgeous cast metal doors and carved woodwork between the elevator doors (Pic. 12/5666)

We usually take a picture of each capitol, but this one was impossible.  It is so large that you couldn't stand far enough away, and the traffic was horrible.  So, we took a picture of this painting of it .  (Pic. 13/5664)

New York State Museum doesn't charge an admission, but they would like a donation of $5 per person.  We spent the last hour of our day enjoying more of it.

It had been a busy day, but there was a movie we wanted to see, "A Walk in the Woods," starring Robert Redford.  At a large, modern theatre we paid only $6/ticket, which is a bargain for us.  And the movie was good!

By the time we got home at 10:00 PM, we were tuckered out.  Our RV park is heavily forested and very dark.  Dean went to the RV first to put on a light for me to be able to see where I was walking.  I heard an expletive!  He had broken the key when he inserted it in the deadbolt.  I had an extra key, but he had to get the key out.  Fortunately, our camp host was kind enough to bring his tools down and got it out.

Staying at Arrowhead Marina & RV Park

Problems with attaching--photos in next post when I figure it out.

Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #25 on: September 22, 2015, 09:25:54 AM »
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Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
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2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #26 on: September 22, 2015, 09:29:09 AM »
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Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
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2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #27 on: September 22, 2015, 09:33:08 AM »
Day 17    September 17, 2015      White River Junction, VT (just a mile from NH)

We drove 133 miles from Schenectady to White River.  The first 75 miles were "white knuckle," quite literally.  I was holding onto the side tray and computer table all the way.  We started on the Mapquested route, and Dean remembered a few miles into it that this was the same way we came to the movies, and there was a 10' clearance bridge.  So we pulled into a parking lot, got out our maps, and re-routed us.  But, it was still curvy, 2-lane state highways most of the way.  And, when you come to cities/towns, they double-park both passenger cars and Fedex in the one lane you do have!  Jaywalkers were everywhere, and they're not at all intimidated by our size.  At one bridge, we had only 6" of clearance, and we prayed that their sign didn't need to be updated.

We had some activities planned, but it was after 4:00 when we finally got here.  It took us 4.5 hours to travel 133 miles with one 25-minute lunch break and one 5-minute bathroom break.  We needed a little while to relax and put on our traveling legs.

We went into Lebanon, NH to the Walmart to try and get a new key for our RV deadbolt.  They make keys, but not what we need.  Home Depot was the same story.  However, at Walmart I did find USA-made lids to put over food when you microwave, and for less than $2.  My wallet fell apart (from getting into it so often to pay tolls on the roads?), and I really like the one I found for $10.  I haven't paid that  little for a wallet in 50 years!  But, it is made in China.

By this time it was after 8:00, so we opted for the Applebees next to Home Depot.

Staying at the White River KOA, $48 for W & E in their one "overflow" area in front of their garages.  Very nice people, but you need to reserve ahead in the fall in Vermont.  Forested, our satellite caught the signal on the morning of the 18th but we had to go to the dump station and we couldn't recover it.

Day 18      September 18, 2015      White River Junction, VT

Today was a day of fix-its.  We went to a locksmith, who made us a replacement key for the deadbolt key and also one for the Jeep.  Dean lost his.  I've been encouraging him to get a murse, but it's a guy thing.  He has so much stuff in his pockets that it was bound to happen.  The new Jeep key works, but it sets off the alarm whenever you unlock the door with it.  We tried to get around it by locking the door with the key, but you can't.  It is a good back-up, but I hope Dean lost his somewhere in the coach and we find it.

In the afternoon, we went to the doctor to fix Dean.  It turns out he has an ordinary stomach bug, but after 5 days, I wanted to make sure.  He is to eat the BRAT diet--Bananas, Rice, Applesauce, and Toast.  No caffeine, and he's a Coke addict!  It's worth it if it works.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Ken & Sheila

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #28 on: September 22, 2015, 09:44:41 AM »
Linda,

If your still in White River I recommend Simon Pearce's  Bar & Restaurant, Retail Boutique & Glassblowing in Quechee.
It's a fun place, good restaurant. Be sure that Dean goes down to see their Hydro plant.
 
Ken & Sheila
2009 Monaco Camelot 42 PDQ
2008 Jeep Liberty, 2006 Saturn Vue
Fur-ball kids: Ariel and Mia

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #29 on: September 22, 2015, 11:31:21 AM »
Linda,

If your still in White River I recommend Simon Pearce's  Bar & Restaurant, Retail Boutique & Glassblowing in Quechee.
It's a fun place, good restaurant. Be sure that Dean goes down to see their Hydro plant.

Thanks, Ken & Sheila.  Unfortunately, I haven't had Internet for 9 days.  RV parks keep promising clear shots, and usually we get none, sometimes TV only.  In White River, I was so excited because our satellite worked on all 5 lights.  I did my banking & business first.  Unfortunately, we were in "overflow" (and very glad to be in their one and only space), but we only had W & E, so Dean had to dump (we were washing lots).  When we came back, we got TV but no more internet.  Or we would definitely have gone to Simon Pearce's.  We left WR 2 days ago.

I learned (but forgot) that I need to post where we're heading.

Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #30 on: September 22, 2015, 11:36:13 AM »
We are in Montpelier, headed tomorrow to Lubec Maine to see Campobello.

After that, we go to Bar Harbor to see Acadia NP, Wendell Gilley Museum, and possibly do a Guildive Cruise.

Then to Rockland/Rockport to see the Farnsworth Art Museum, Hardy Boat Cruise for fall foliage & history, and on to Augusta.

Anyone with something to add to our itinerary, please feel free.  How long we stay up here is dependent somewhat on what color the leaves are.  Timing leaves is a lot like timing investments--almost impossible--but our dream is to migrate south with the leaf color.  Pipe dream???

Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Ken & Sheila

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #31 on: September 22, 2015, 03:46:10 PM »
Linda
The Ben & Jerry's factory is in Waterbury and the Von Trapp Family lodge is in Stowe.  Said it reminded them of home when they buit there.
Ken & Sheila
2009 Monaco Camelot 42 PDQ
2008 Jeep Liberty, 2006 Saturn Vue
Fur-ball kids: Ariel and Mia

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #32 on: September 22, 2015, 04:16:10 PM »
Linda
The Ben & Jerry's factory is in Waterbury and the Von Trapp Family lodge is in Stowe.  Said it reminded them of home when they buit there.

Thanks,  the Ben & Jerry's is a ton of fun, but it's a one-timer. 

We've seen "The Sound of Music" so many times that seeing their lodge might be fun.  We are awaiting our FedEx package, so we'll either do the hotel or a scenic drive.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

HappyWanderer

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #33 on: September 22, 2015, 06:41:05 PM »
How long we stay up here is dependent somewhat on what color the leaves are.  Timing leaves is a lot like timing investments--almost impossible--but our dream is to migrate south with the leaf color.  Pipe dream???

With the warm days and cool nights that we've been having, there should be a dramatic change in color in another week or so.

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #34 on: September 23, 2015, 08:47:52 AM »
 
Day 19      September 19, 2015      White River Junction, VT

We enjoy raptor centers, and there is one just a couple of miles from our camp, the best we've ever visited.  VINS (Vermont Institute of  Natural Science) charges $12.50 for seniors and receives no federal or state funds, so admissions and donations fund their $1.3 million budget.

Their staff is amazingly knowledgeable and so friendly and willing to share.  As we were strolling to the Vet Care Center, we met the Manager, who gave us lots of interesting information.  We shared how impressed we were with his staff, and he said that was the biggest budget item.  He just lost his #2 man, who was earning $70.000 a year.  He moved to Los Alamos to take a government position at over triple the money, $210,000+!!  He made us aware of the newest display showing the relationship through time of the dinosaurs and birds.  Everything here was of excellent quality.  Even the trees were labeled as to type.

The Raptor Talk was given by 2 summer-only lecturers who sounded like they had  Ph.D.'s in ornithology, with a specialty in raptors.  Raptors' name comes from the Latin repere, which is means "to grasp."  All raptors have forward -facing eyes, which gives them good depth perception, unlike ducks who can't judge and start paddling many feet above where they land and until they hit the water.  They all grasp their prey with talons and have a sharp knife-like beak.  Only 1 in 5 hunting attempts is successful.  Raptors are a sentinel species and were very important in determining the problems with DDT.

All raptors except the Harris Hawk are solitary.  They will mate for life, but they only get together to raise a new family, and then it's, "See you here next year."  The golden eagle lost her partner last year, (due to old age) and she spent 2 months uttering constant mournful cries.  The nature center finally decided to move the golden eagle that they used in shows into her cage, and the widow immediately stopped her cries. (He didn't like being a show bird anyway.)

The rough-legged hawk (Pic.1/5738) has feathers that cover his legs.  These are important because he lives in the Arctic and flies south to VERMONT!! to winter.

Buteos are a class of birds with broad wings and tails who ride air currents and some members can hover.  The rough-legged hawk and the American Kestrel (Pic 2/5685) are buteos.  The kestrel is a falcon, not a hawk, and is often misnamed "sparrow hawk" because he eats sparrows.  In the wild, mice urinate as they walk, giving them a trail to follow back home.  However, the trail luminesces for the kestrel, and it leads him right to his prey.  The mouse may duck into a hole.  However, the kestrel hovers, and is able to lock his head in place while moving the rest of his body, ensuring that he never loses sight of where his prey is.  He tries to kill his prey by punching it at high speed with a hit to the head, which usually works.  If not he gets it with his grasp by the talons, and a notch in his beak allows him to snap the prey's neck.  In his dive, he exceeds 200 miles per hour!

The barred owl (Picture 3/5741) has striped feathers (bars) and eyes that are shaped like a pear to let in lots of light.  The smallest part of the pear (end) is what we see, so imagine what's inside his head!  He has lots of light-sensing rods, and he can see well during the day.  His 2 giant facial disk sound funnels on his face are like two gigantic ears, and he can move his feathers to reshape the funnel to listen in specific directions.  His wings are shaped for silent flight.  That way he won't alert his prey or disrupt his hearing of the prey's movements.  His call sounds a lot like a barking dog.  He loves fishing in swamps.

The Harris Hawk (Picture 4/5730) is also called The Winged Wolf.  They are found in the southwestern US.  They form a group and hunt jackrabbits.  They weigh about 1.5 pounds, and jackrabbits weigh 9-10 pounds, and jackrabbits don't want to be eaten, so they have to work together.  One hawk lands on a cactus, then another lands on him, until there are 5-8 birds stacked one on top of another.  Two of the hawks chase the prey, while the others in the hawk tower keep their eyes riveted on the prey.  When those two hawks get tired, the next two take over.  Eventually the jackrabbit tires and goes to a bush.  The group surrounds the bush and keep probing and jabbing at it until the rabbit is exhausted, and they have their meal.  He flew fast and low over the audience (Picture 5/5724)

The Cooper's Hawk was my favorite.  He is the most beautiful Cooper's I've ever seen.  He uses his long tail to fly through wooded areas and make sharp turns.  If only our pictures of him had come out well enough to print!

Dean and I visited the enclosures of about 20 raptors; this is by far the largest raptor center we've visited.  At 1:00, we took the raptor enclosure guided tour.  It sounded boring, but it was very interesting.  The guide told us what problems they encountered with each bird and how they adapted each enclosure to the bird's handicap and likes and dislikes.  The bald eagle (Pic 6/5671) is very friendly and likes to sit up front and look over his visitors.  The snowy owl was so so white!  (Picture 7/5760)

At 1:30, the talk on raptor sounds provided a chance to see more birds up close.  The great horned owl is the largest, most aggressive owl.  (Picture 8/5768) He can turn his head 270° as he swivels his neck.  He hoots to attract a mate and establish territories.  But, this owl won't quit!  He hoots constantly.  He would starve in the wild because he would give away his position to prey.  He was hit by a car and has had 2 seizures.  He is blind in one eye, and is extremely calm, which is very unusual (brain damage?).  The rehabilitators are often able to return a raptor with one eye to the wild, but not one as noisy as he is!  Doesn't he have an expressive face?

The barn owl (Picture 9/5784) sounds like a screecher with a very shrill cry, whereas the screech owl actually has a melodious call.  All barn owls have one eye higher than the other to allow better vision.  This one was purposely imprinted on humans (he thinks he is human) because they wanted a bird for educational purposes.  He would not hunt prey in the wild; he would look for a human to feed him.  In choosing a mate, he would choose a human girlfriend.

Dean dropped me at home and went on to the American Precision Museum.  He said it would be of interest only to machinists.

Staying at Limehurst Lake Campground -- FHU $120.21/3 days, nice host, on a lake, pretty scenery, no extras
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #35 on: September 23, 2015, 08:54:02 AM »
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Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
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2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #36 on: September 23, 2015, 09:36:02 AM »
Day 20      September 20, 2015      White River Junction, VT

Today we planned to go to the Calvin Coolidge National Historic Site and a science museum, but the CCNHS was so good, we spent the whole day there.  Vermont was the birthplace of Coolidge and President Chester Arthur.  We paid  $14 for 2 admissions with AAA discount.  They have preserved the whole village as it was in the early 1900's, and almost everything is original.  There is the home where he was born, the church, cheese factory, one-room schoolhouse, the barn, and general store, and many have original furnishings.  The President is buried in the town cemetery. 

We saw a very short film on Coolidge's life and several pictures with explanations or simplistic audio.  He attended a one-room schoolhouse with 23 students aged 5 (Calvin) through 18.  Students moved at their own pace.  At age 12, his sister passed everything and qualified to be a teacher.  Calvin was only an average student, but he passed the exam to be a teacher at age 13.  He moved to a nearby town to attend high school.  He was a true farm boy, and he tended animals, baled hay, picked and sold apples, and kept accounts for his well-respected shopkeeper & businessman father who served 10 years as a state senator and assembly member.  Cal graduated from Amherst (Massachusetts) with honors and law school.

But, he wasn't always a good boy.  The boys of Union (next town) and Plymouth Notch (Cal's town) vied for the honor of firing the cannon on the Fourth of July.  Cal and his friends settled the issue for once and for all in 1892.  They formed a raiding party and crept down in the early morning hours of the 4th and quietly took the 500-pound cannon from its place at the Union.  They dragged it up the steep slope to the Notch and hid it behind the pile of manure in the basement of the Wilder (grandpa) barn.  When the doors were opened, the floor boards lifted up, rolling out the cannon without using any of the perpetrators.  A long lanyard was pulled, and the cannon boomed.  It was heard throughout the sleeping village.  Before they could gather their wits, the cannon was quickly drawn back inside the barn with a long rope, and the barn doors were closed.  Swiftly it was swabbed out, reloaded and rolled out again and fired.  Meanwhile, the Union City boys had heard the distant thunder and discovered their prize cannon missing, and they came running up the road.  John Wilder (grandpa) met them and told them that he'd fight them all.  So they backed down  That afternoon the young Amherst student Cal gave a stirring speech on the glories of independence and looked like he was a model citizen.

He had an interest in politics and was defeated when he ran for school board, but two years later was elected to the Massachusetts state legislature.  He won a statewide race for the Massachusetts Senate in 1912, and then he became governor.  He did all his politics in Massachusetts, but he always considered himself a Vermonter.  He won national attention when he called out the National Guard when the Boston police went on strike.  He told Samuel Gompers, the AFL leader, that no one had the right to strike against public safety, anytime, anywhere.  He supported a cost-of-living pay increase for public employees, limited the workweek for women and children to 48 hours, and limited outdoor advertising.  He believed that women should have the right to vote.

He went to the RNC in Chicago in 1920 as his state's favorite son, but he only got 34 votes.  Backroom dealing was supposed to nominate Irving Lenroot of Wisconsin to be Harding's VP.  But, rebellious delegates swept Cal onto the ticket.

When Cal was vacationing at his home, President Harding died from a heart attack.  His father administered the Oath of Office to Cal because he was eligible to do so in his position of notary public in this room (Picture 1/5805).  At the time, he thought that taking the oath was just something he had to do.  Later, he came to appreciate the ceremonial aspect.  He fulfilled the remaining year of Harding's presidency and was re-elected.   His re-election was assured, but he chose not to run because he didn't think it was best for the country.  He made extensive use of the radio and reached more Americans than all previous presidents combined.  He really was a simple, common sense man.

We've seen lots of old homesteads, but we saw many new items to us, especially in the barn.  Picture 2/5790 is a winter hearse with sled runners to get through the snow.  Picture 3/5793 is a rural free delivery sleigh used in the winters of the 1920s and 1930s.  It has a small stove in it.  The shafts are off-center so that the horse could walk in the runner track made by previous sleighs.  Early carrier had to buy their own vehicles, and they had to provide and care for their own horses. 

Picture 4/5796 is Cal's maternal grandparents' house, and it is now a wonderful restaurant.  Dean and I had lunch there.  Vermont values--$1.25 for my cup of soup and the same for Dean's cup of chili.

Picture 5/5798 is a nanny rocker located in the bedroom where Cal was born.  You put the baby next to you with the front bars up and could then rock him,  while having your hands free to be able to knit.  If guests came over and you needed extra seating, the bars are removable, and it's a 2-seat rocker.

The birds' eye maple and oak counter used in the general store today was made by Cal and his father in his youth. (Picture 6/5799)

Pictures 7 & 8/5800 & 5801 are of the gorgeous community church that Cal attended as a youth and every time he vacationed in Vermont during his presidency.  I loved the curving wooden roof. 

We went to the cheese factory that was founded in 1890 by the Coolidge family.  Plymouth is the second oldest operating cheese maker in the U.S.  They make their cheese by hand and waxed it, the way they did it over 125 years ago.  I could taste the difference.  It was so good that we bought some, although it was expensive.

The signage gave little information about the accomplishments of Cal's presidency.  There were few that I could find, even looking at the Internet.  He signed into law a bill giving Native Americans US citizenship and allowing them to retain their sovereignity.  He visited the Sioux and  when he signed the bill they made him an honorary chief, "Chief Leading Eagle," at the Summer White House in South Dakota.  He visited Cuba.  He signed a pact with 62 nations in 1929 renouncing war.  He fostered good relations with businesses and was fortunate to serve in a time of economic prosperity.

It was a beautiful Vermont day, and there was a feeling here of a simpler life, but a comfortable life.  The President's son and daughter-in-law gave the house and all the furnishings to the State of Vermont, complete with the furnishings exactly as they were in 1923.  The State of Vermont bought the cheese factory from John in 1960.  They have re-established production of the distinctive granular curd-type Plymouth Cheese., which was so good that we bought some. 

Staying at Limehurst Lake Campground -- FHU $120.21/3 days, nice host, on a lake, pretty scenery, no extras
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #37 on: September 23, 2015, 09:56:11 AM »
Day 21      September 21, 2015      Williamstown (Outside Montpelier), VT

Vermont was a land of dispute between New Hampshire and New York, both of whom gave settlers grants of the same land.  England and France also fought over it.  Vermont tried to be the 14th original colony, but they were rejected.  There was a strong movement to join Canada since the U. S. didn't want them.  In 1777, they became a republic.

They built their first state house in 1808 and stayed there until they outgrew it in 1836,  The second state house lasted from 1838-1857, when they had a fire and burned it down.  It was really cold and the legislature was in session.  Workmen stoked the wood stoves to provide heat and then took a coffee break.  All that was saved was the portico in front that was used in this third capitol and a portrait of George Washington.

When they built the third capitol, (Pic 1/5806), they were almost paranoid about fire prevention.  The columns inside and the stairs look like they are wood, but they are actually cast iron (which wouldn't burn). They even put huge iron shutters over the windows to be able to cut off oxygen in case of fire. 

There were no trees at the Capitol, as there are today, because all of Vermont's trees had been cut down to provide wood to build ships in Massachusetts.  They used lots of open land to feed sheep, which were later replaced by dairy cows.  Later, there were efforts to reverse the deforestation.

From over a mile away, we could see the copper dome that was gilded with 23.7 K gold in the 1900's  shining.  At its top stands the statue of Agriculture.  The original statue rotted and was in danger of toppling off the dome.  With help from Capitol janitors, the 87-year-old Sergeant-at-Arms carved a 14-foot replacement mounted on a six-foot pedestal.

As we entered, we noticed the black and white checked floor.  The white is Vermont marble, and the black is  marble with lots of fossils in it (Pic 2/5835).

We were able to go into the Senate, (Pic 3/5812) which meets from January to April or May.  It has been restored to its original state, just as it was when first build except for the vanity curtains in front of the desks, which are original (Pic.4/5813).  When ladies were elected to the Senate, these were added (Pic 5/5816).  The chairs were originally upholstered with horsehair, but today's leather is much more comfortable.  The lieutenant governor runs the Senate.  There are 25 Democrats and 5 Republicans.  There is a Democratic governor and a republican lieutenant governor.  The Senators have no staff and no offices.  There are legislative lawyers assigned to specialties such as agriculture, and they can go consult with them.  The governor, lieutenant governor, President Pro Tem, and the Speaker of the House are the only ones with offices.  Each of the legislators has a license plate with the number of their region so their voters will recognize them when they're driving down the street, especially when they are home.  No technology is allowed in the Senate.  It's interesting that in New York there will be no paper in their legislature by January, 2016, and in Vermont they are all paper.  There is one senator per county, regardless of population or size.

We looked for the rotunda and inner dome, but there is none.  When they were building the Capitol, it was in the plans, but the Director of the Budget axed it.

Until the 1960's, there was one representative for each town or city, regardless of population, and there were 251 representatives.  They decided it would be better to elect by districts of equal population, and it has been done that way ever since.  Lines are redrawn when the census is done every 10 years.  There are now 150 representatives.  Our guide has lived in the same house since 1975, and she's been in 3 different districts. 

In the house, desks are original.  The senators can't come in without an invitation, usually for the governor's State of the State speech.  They sit up front in the chairs usually used by the general public (Pic 6/5817).  The painting of George Washington  rescued from the fire is hung here.  The State Seal is prominent (Pic 7/5823).  It shows the importance of agriculture in the state.  Lights are original, but have been converted from gas to electricity.  If you want to talk with you representative, it's easy.  They all give out their home addresses, personal phone numbers, personal email, and government email.  They work Tuesday through Friday.  The MOST compensation they can receive with maximum per diem is $5,500!!!  This is a very thrifty state!  They have no governor's mansion, either.  They have a problem raising money.  Many of their residents go to New Hampshire to buy goods because they have 0% sales tax, whereas Vermont has a 9% sales tax.  In the last session, they voted to recapture the lost revenue from car sales by charging the sales tax when you register a new car, even if it wasn't purchased in Vermont.  There are no term limits for any position.

The governor serves coffee and donuts every Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday in his Ceremonial Office (Pic 8/5826).  This gives the people a chance to chat with him.  The Constitution Chair behind the desk is made from timber of the ship the USS Constitution (Old Ironsides).  A Vermonter asked what they were going to do with the wood and was told that they were going to throw it away.  He took the wood and made a chair for every state in the Union at the time with that state's seal.

They took us into the Cedar Creek Room to show us a painting of the Vermont soldiers done by a 15-year-old who became one of the state's most famous painters.  But, I was more interested in the original glass skylights in the room (Pic 9/5826).  They had been covered over many times and were discovered by workers when there was a leak.  The glass had been shattered.  The restorers took all those glass shards and recreated the original stained glass skylights, adding new pieces of glass to fill in the missing pieces.

Of course, Bernie Sanders is a big name in Vermont.   He was the mayor of Burlington and then served Vermont in the U. S. Senate, but he never served in either of the statehouses.

Staying at Limehurst Lake Campground -- FHU $120.21/3 days, nice host, on a lake, pretty scenery, no extras
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #38 on: September 23, 2015, 09:59:00 AM »
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Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #39 on: September 23, 2015, 10:10:57 AM »
Day 22      September 22, 2015      Williamstown, VT

We had Internet this morning so we stayed at the RV and took care of business.  This just left us the afternoon.  Yesterday at the Capitol, we were told that we should visit the Vermont Historical Society.  Admission was $3.  It was like a museum, but instead of having many relics, it had just a few.  There was one impressive relic, this  great-grandfather clock (too big to just be a grandfather) which was once in an elegant Montpelier hotel.  (Pic 1)

Primarily, this historical building was a timeline of illustrated signboards about the history of Vermont, which was really interesting.  Their state motto is "Freedom and Unity," which prevailed through the whole timeline.  They believe strongly in giving the most possible freedom for each individual while being unified in providing for safety and the shared values of the community.

Vermont joined the US in 1791 as a non-slave state, but allowing that slave-holding states could do as they want.  The first half of the Vermont Constitution outlawed slavery. There were many abolitionist groups who wanted  total freedom for slaves, but most believed in "gradually abolishing slavery in the US."      How is that achieved, specifically?  I don't get it, and I wish they'd described the plan.  I think it's kind of like being a little bit pregnant.  Many of the abolitionists felt that the slaves should be returned to Africa.

When Lincoln asked Vermont what he could expect from Vermont if the South seceded, its governor said, "Vermont will do its duty."  They were a big part of the Underground Railroad until the Federal government cracked down and threatened them.  At the Capitol, we were told that Vermont sent more men into battle in the Civil War than any other state.  However, other states make the same claim.

Vermont was the first state to give women the right to vote in state elections.  However, when the 19th amendment was proposed, their governor refused to sign it, and it became law without Vermont's vote.  In 1999, the legislature voted to allow same sex couples to form a union/partnership.  Over 1500 people came to Montpelier (which is a lot in Vermont!) to express their feelings to the legislature.

I admire people who admit their wrong deeds.  In the early 1920's, the Ku Klux Klan was active in persecuting African Americans, Jews, and Catholics.  The Irish, French Canadians, and Italians immigrated.  Their Catholic religion, languages, and cultural traditions made them considered outsiders. They didn't think they would carry on Vermont's traditional values. Two major cities made laws banning meetings of people wearing masks or disguises.  They had a KKK hood on display.  However,  the citizenry accomplished the defeat of the KKK quickly by boycotting businesses whose owners were KKK members.

Their other black mark was the Vermont Eugenics Survey, which was founded by a professor at the University of Vermont.  He did multi-generational studies of Vermonters in institutions to document genetic defects.  In 1931, Vermont sterilized them so their genes wouldn't be passed on.  The study and sterilizations ended in 1936.

We really like the hard-working host at our RV park and its pretty setting by a forested lake with ducks (who unfortunately quack at 6:00 AM). (Pics 2 & 3)

Staying at Limehurst Lake Campground -- FHU $120.21/3 days, nice host, on a lake, pretty scenery, no extras
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #40 on: September 23, 2015, 10:17:02 AM »
With the warm days and cool nights that we've been having, there should be a dramatic change in color in another week or so.
Thanks for the expert prediction.  We have seen a change in just the 3 days we've been here.  I was so impressed by the maroon leaves in the tree in front of our RV that I asked Dean to take a picture of it.  Unfortunately, it also had 6 different colored suns in it.  Dean says it was a reflection from the lens.  We'll try again today at a different time of day.

We're thinking that in moving to Maine, we should be hitting their peak.  But, what do we Californians know?
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

HappyWanderer

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #41 on: September 23, 2015, 10:21:41 AM »
If you want the full experience, I've got a couple of rakes and a big yard...

ArdraF

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #42 on: September 23, 2015, 02:58:31 PM »
Linda, your descriptions of the raptors was absolutely fascinating.  Mother Nature is so amazing!  Thanks for giving us such a complete write-up.

ArdraF
ArdraF
:D :D

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #43 on: September 24, 2015, 08:47:35 AM »
If you want the full experience, I've got a couple of rakes and a big yard...

If we had the time, I'd love to stop and watch you rake....  Seriously, though, with all that work you get all that beauty, and in my younger days, I would have said, "Give me that rake!" if I could have had that in my yard.  In California, our leaves go from green to brown, and may not finish falling off until spring. 

This country up here is so awe-inspiring.  And I like the people.  But, in the museum the lady said they had two 5-day periods of -20 to -30. And, she said she walked to work every day in that, with 6" of snow on the ground.  I don't think I was ever that hearty.  I can't believe all the mobile homes I see up here.  How do people survive in that weather?
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #44 on: September 24, 2015, 08:49:37 AM »
Linda, your descriptions of the raptors was absolutely fascinating.  Mother Nature is so amazing!  Thanks for giving us such a complete write-up.

ArdraF

Thanks.  I had a fabulous time there and wrote them up on Yelp and Tripadvisor so others will be sure to go.  Such dedicated people!
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #45 on: September 24, 2015, 09:20:55 AM »
Day 22      September 22, 2015      Williamstown, VT    A wonderful day!

We really appreciate Ken & Sheila's suggestion to visit the Von Trapp site in Stowe.  We had already planned to drive Highway 100 to see the pretty landscape and trees, but Dean had nixed the Von Trapp Lodge.  We so enjoyed our time there--lots of farm animals in real pastures, beautiful flowers and gardens everywhere, and a gorgeous lodge built in 1981.  They sell 2500 sq. ft. chalets within the Austrian-themed lodge featuring 2 master bedrooms, 1 guest bedroom, 3 bathrooms, interior decorating and more.  You can buy 1/12 share and keep the same month each year, but you get a deed title, or you can buy the chalet outright for 12 months.  I would love to know what it costs, but I'm sure it's astronomical. The hilltop is absolutely beautiful and encompasses over 2500 acres of hiking/biking trails.  But, it doesn't have the "tourist" feel.  The views are breath-taking, and the weather was a perfect 72° day.  We were too late for their 11:00 once-daily tour ($18), but it got raves on Tripadvisor and I would have come earlier had I known about it.  It tells the "real" Von Trapp story.  I looked at their paperback book about the family, but I thought $30 was ridiculous, so I'll check other sources.  I enjoyed seeing their pictures hanging on the wall in the basement.

We had a lovely lunch in their lounge, which has a gorgeous view.  Dean had a grass-fed beef hamburger, and I had their bratwurst with sauerkraut and an interesting cherry mustard and Dijon mustard with a bit of horseradish.  The best part for me was the German potato salad.  My great-grandmother immigrated from Germany and made German potato salad.  In turn, she taught my mother.  However, whenever my mother saw it on a menu, she had to try it and compare.  That tradition passed on to me, and I think this was the best I've ever tasted.  I bought a side order to bring home.

On the road home, we stopped at the Old Hollow Cedar Mill and enjoyed the best apple cider with no sugar added.  It tasted like liquid apples.  Dean loved their apple butter and bought some. We also bought 6 cider donuts and brought 2 back for the RV park owner.  I wasn't as impressed with the donuts.

We by-passed the handmade chocolate shop, but the car was magnetized to stop at Ben & Jerry's.  We skipped the interesting factory tour, and got their smallest cup of Cherries Garcia.  Yummmmm...

Beautiful weather, gorgeous scenery, nice people, delicious food......what could be better than that?

One question for you techies--I have a satellite and we get great Internet in the morning.  But, each night when we get back around 5:00, I can get TV but not Internet.  There are few, thin clouds, not enough to interfere.  Any ideas about what's happening?  It's a bit frustrating.

Staying at Limehurst Lake Campground -- FHU $120.21/3 days, nice host, on a lake, pretty scenery, no extras
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #46 on: September 24, 2015, 07:08:39 PM »
Day 24      September 24, 2015       Travel Day     Palmyra, ME

We drove 190 fairly hard miles.  US 2 had a lot of curves and washboard, bumpy areas--enough so that our normal tie-downs on chairs, etc. had to be re-fashioned.  Navigating the narrow lanes in towns was challenging.  Every now and then we'd hit a patch of a few miles that was silky smooth, giving us hope.  We saw a little color.

Staying at Walmart.  Very welcoming manager.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Ken & Sheila

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #47 on: September 24, 2015, 08:02:58 PM »
Linda,

If you come back through the Bangor area there is a nice PA park just a few miles from where you are.
Palmyra Golf Course and Campground on Lang Hill RD. $18


« Last Edit: September 26, 2015, 09:55:03 AM by Ken & Sheila »
Ken & Sheila
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2008 Jeep Liberty, 2006 Saturn Vue
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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #48 on: September 26, 2015, 09:12:05 AM »
Day 25      September 25, 2015       Travel Day    Lubec, ME

We drove about 150 bumpy miles.  At an earlier RV park, we met a couple from New England who said they had traded in their Airstream trailer after 70,000 miles because it was falling apart from driving over these roads.  Dean and I were surprised, but now we are believers.

Lubec is the easternmost point in the United States and also the closest point to Africa.

We learned that the nearest cell tower to our park is in Canada, so we signed up for Verizon's Canada program at $5 for each phone for a month,  although we'll only be here a couple of days to see Campobello (FDR's summer home). 

I can't wait to eat lobster rolls, so I was disappointed that Becky's was closed already.  Her father goes out each morning and brings back fish and lobsters, which she cooks and sells from a trailer.  Everyone gave it rave reviews, but it was closed at 4:30 when Dean got there. 

So we went to dinner at the restaurant that our park manager recommended, Cohill's Pub.  Our GPS led us across the bridge to the Canadian border, which provided us with an opportunity to check on crossing it tomorrow.  We did not realize that we had to enter Canada to get to Campobello, and we left our passports at home.  We really didn't want to wait for our daughter to send them to us, and our RV park manager tells us that as of late, Canada has been letting people through if they present their driver's license and they show up on their computers as having a passport.  We learned what the policy was (we already knew because I'd called) and that it depended on the officer on duty.  So, we will cross our fingers and try tomorrow.  Dean really enjoyed his burger, and I thought my haddock was good.   Portions were generous, and we brought food home.  I was happy that I got to try smoked salmon on a stick.  It was very good.  However, the meal was very pricey for what it was.

Staying at Sunset Point RV Park--W & 50 amps, free wifi, right on the water. 

High 64°   Low 37°
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

HappyWanderer

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #49 on: September 26, 2015, 11:52:25 AM »
The problem isn't with crossing into Canada, it's getting back into the US. The nastiest US Customs people we've even encountered were at Campobello.

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #50 on: September 26, 2015, 10:38:44 PM »
Day 25      September 25, 2015       Travel Day    Lubec, ME

We drove about 150 bumpy miles.  At an earlier RV park, we met a couple from New England who said they had traded in their Airstream trailer after 70,000 miles because it was falling apart from driving over these roads.  Dean and I were surprised, but now we are believers.


Linda,

Did you take Hwy 9 (Airline) or Hwy 1 to get to Lubec from Bangor. We drove Hwy 9 year before last on the way to Canada and it was OK. In the past Hwy 1 was always a rough road but I haven't been on it north of Ellsworth in years.

I like to know because we will be going to Eastport next year.

ken
Ken & Sheila
2009 Monaco Camelot 42 PDQ
2008 Jeep Liberty, 2006 Saturn Vue
Fur-ball kids: Ariel and Mia

Hfx_Cdn

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #51 on: September 27, 2015, 06:59:25 AM »
    Happy Wanderer, with the border crossing changes that have come into place over the past year, I'm not so sure an American can still gain entry into Canada with only picture ID.  American Homeland Security has insisted on changes, and I'm not sure all of the changes are totally understood.
    Linda, I'm surprised that seasoned travellers as you and Dean would travel without carrying your Passports, even if you thought that you were not expecting to cross the border.  You never know.  Donna and I carry them with us, even when we go visit our kids who live in Ottawa, just in case we decide at the last minute to take the longer alternate route through the White Mountains.  That aside, there are plenty of fish and lobster restaurants everywhere here in the Maritimes, the weather is gorgeous, and the leaves will soon start showing their colours.

Ed
Ed & Donna
Winter-Pinellas Park FL, Summer- Maritime Canada
2000 Coachmen Catalina 34' DP (owned 2004 to 2015)
2006 Jeep Liberty Toad

Alfa38User

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #52 on: September 27, 2015, 07:50:54 AM »
Not only is entry into Canada  more difficult but an American without passports and trying to re-enter the USA is likely to be given a hard time or even denied entry by Homeland Security people. It was well published several years ago that US citizens now require their passports to re-enter USA. The only exception is perhaps having those enhanced drivers licenses with the required citizenship information on them. (And they only work for land crossings, not air travel FWIW).

Happy Travels!!!
« Last Edit: September 27, 2015, 07:54:00 AM by Alfa38User »
Stu
Montréal, Canada 🍁
Snowbird, Naples Florida
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"Of course I talk to myself, sometimes I need expert advise!!!"

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #53 on: September 27, 2015, 09:23:58 AM »

Day 26      September 25, 2015       Lubec, ME

TripAdvisor tripped me up and told me that Campobello (the summer vacation home of FDR, Eleanor, and their kids) opened at noon, when in reality they opened at 10:00.  It's the first time the site has ever been wrong, but now that we are in the off-season, I will call ahead and verify in the future.  This was important because the highlight of the day was Tea with Eleanor.  The Visitors Center gives out tickets for the free tea and cookies with two docents on a first-come, first-served basis.  We got the last one ticket, and I quickly grabbed it because I'm the one who has been reading Eleanor's biography at home and Teddy's biography on the road.  We then saw the short film about the Roosevelts and a guide brought Dean an extra ticket.  Hurrah!

Campobello (Picture 1/5848) is a joint venture between the US and Canadian governments.  It includes FDR's home and grounds that are on a hill above The Bay of Fundy.  The bay has a 30 foot delta between high and low tides.  His home has 34 bedrooms and has lots of bright flowers that seem to thrive in this BRRR cold (Pictures 2/5851 & 3/5852).  We got a glimpse into the life they lived here.  FDR came to the island for the first time with his parents when he was only 18 months old.  As a youth, he spent every summer here racing boats, playing pool, playing board games, (Picture 4/5855), having 3-legged races, and going to dances.  He was in robust health.  In the game room is one of the sailboats he whittled and sailed with his children.

He loved watching the activities of the bay with his telescope. (Picture 5/5856)  They had 2 residents of the island who acted as cook and caretaker, and they brought along 6 servants with them.  The kitchen was a busy place (Picture 6/5857).  FDR added this beautiful water heater.  When many places were converting from gas lamps to electric, FDR asked Eleanor, and she said, "NO!" 

The highlight of the day was Tea with Eleanor.  The two docents talked for an hour and had all of us listening and laughing.   I am reading Eleanor's biography, but I knew very few of their stories.  Eleanor was a huge advocate of all peoples' right.  When she was first lady, the Secret Service uncovered the information that the KKK had put a $5000 bounty on her head.  She had planned to visit the South, and the Secret Service told her absolutely not.  She didn't argue.  She just took shooting lessons and bought a gun, which she carried with her as she toured the South.  She didn't have to use it, which she said was good because she was a very poor marksman.  She was such an amazing woman that I can't believe that we are still debating what woman to put on the ten dollar bill.  These ladies love talking about Eleanor and admire her so much that they transmitted the feeling to all of us. 

Staying at Sunset Point RV Park.

Headed to Bar Harbor, Rockland/Rockport, Augusta, Boothbay, Portland--all in Maine.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #54 on: September 27, 2015, 09:32:00 AM »
Not only is entry into Canada  more difficult but an American without passports and trying to re-enter the USA is likely to be given a hard time or even denied entry by Homeland Security people. It was well published several years ago that US citizens now require their passports to re-enter USA. The only exception is perhaps having those enhanced drivers licenses with the required citizenship information on them. (And they only work for land crossings, not air travel FWIW).

Happy Travels!!!

I think they may be more liberal on the road to Campobello, which is an island.  Maybe they have another checkpoint if you try to enter Canada from any of the ferries or in a boat, so this isn't as hard a checkpoint.  We were very glad it worked because we drove a lot of extra miles to get here.  The agent talked with us for a while, took our drivers' licenses, and pulled up our passports on the computer.  She was very nice.  The first night when we got lost and accidentally crossed the border, the US agent did the same thing and told us we wouldn't have any trouble getting back into the US.  If we had any idea that we would be in Canada, we would have brought our passports with us.  Dean had me remove PASSPORTS from my file entitled, "Things to Bring Each Time," that we check off each time before we leave.  I have already put it back on the list.

Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Hfx_Cdn

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #55 on: September 27, 2015, 10:59:21 AM »
    There are no ferries from NB to Maine, however there is a ferry from Campobello to Dear Island, and another from Dear Island to mainland NB.  FWIW, Dear Island is where our 2000 Coachmen ended up, with the purchaser intending to snowbird in Florida this winter.
     There is a nice Provincial Park on Campobello at Wilson's Beach, where we swam in a pond separated from the Bay of Fundy, the temperature of the pond was in the high 70's, so we thought that we would cool off by going from it to the Bay, where we found out that it truly is bone chilling at under 50 F and that was mid August.
     Enjoy the rest of your trip, only next time plan of visiting Atlantic Canada, it is worth the time.

Ed
Ed & Donna
Winter-Pinellas Park FL, Summer- Maritime Canada
2000 Coachmen Catalina 34' DP (owned 2004 to 2015)
2006 Jeep Liberty Toad

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #56 on: September 29, 2015, 07:12:02 AM »
   
     Enjoy the rest of your trip, only next time plan of visiting Atlantic Canada, it is worth the time.

Ed

Thanks, Ed.  I have discovered that my idea of timing the leaves wasn't a good idea.  The leaves we've seen have been dull in color.  Locals tell us they had little rain in the last year and that is what brings the vibrant color.  We've encountered cold, but not the freezing that is required for the bright colors, also.  My favorite tree was a red maple that was gorgeous--but that's its color all the time.  We are predicted now to have a week or rain, so we are skipping Rockland and Rockport, where I had all outdoor activities planned.  We are moving on tomorrow to Augusta.  If/when we do the Maritimes, it will be in the summer!  Brrrr!  (I'm from the Land of Concrete & Sun)  I appreciate the trees up here--just beautiful in Acadia NP, but I miss my warmth.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #57 on: September 29, 2015, 10:17:13 AM »
Day 27      September 27, 2015       Trenton, Maine (near Bar Harbor)

We made the easy drive in about 2 hours and got here in time for Dean to go to the Seal Cove Auto Museum.   He reports that they had a "nice little collection of classics, spanning roughly 1904 to l928."  The collection includes bicycles and motorcycles.  Some of them are in driving condition and are driven to festivities in local cities.

Staying  at Timberland Acres RV Park--$38  FHU  Good satellite or forested, you pick, great hosts
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Hfx_Cdn

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #58 on: September 29, 2015, 11:00:44 AM »
    Jinda, don't forget with the high tides flushing the Bay of Fundy twice a day, the land along the coast stays cool all along that coast.  It was that cool clear air that attracted so many to establish summer homes near the Atlantic coast.  In the summer, you don't have to get too far inland to lose that effect and see temps in the 90s and 100s.  If you want to see the absence of trees, go see true sand deserts at Acadia National Park, or the Desert of Maine near Freeport, there is a nice campground adjacent to that one, and Freeport is the home of LL Bean.

Ed
Ed & Donna
Winter-Pinellas Park FL, Summer- Maritime Canada
2000 Coachmen Catalina 34' DP (owned 2004 to 2015)
2006 Jeep Liberty Toad

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #59 on: October 01, 2015, 08:36:39 PM »
    Jinda, don't forget with the high tides flushing the Bay of Fundy twice a day, the land along the coast stays cool all along that coast.  It was that cool clear air that attracted so many to establish summer homes near the Atlantic coast.  In the summer, you don't have to get too far inland to lose that effect and see temps in the 90s and 100s.  If you want to see the absence of trees, go see true sand deserts at Acadia National Park, or the Desert of Maine near Freeport, there is a nice campground adjacent to that one, and Freeport is the home of LL Bean.

Ed

Thanks, Ed.  We missed the deserts, but I put them in my log for next time.  We blew it on visiting Portland.  I was really looking forward to visiting the Wild Duck Campground in Audubon's Scarborough Marsh.  All the RV parks have been over 50% vacant, and a big rainstorm is coming in, so I didn't anticipate that they might be totally booked up, but they are.  We are now headed to Concord, Auburn, Manchester, Canterbury, and Cornish--all in NH.  We are booked for 3 nights at Calef Lake Camping Area near Auburn, and I have ideas for the others, except Cornish.  We may just stop and see the sights there on our way through.  If you have suggestions, please let me know.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #60 on: October 01, 2015, 08:48:57 PM »
Day 28      September 28, 2015       Trenton, Maine (near Bar Harbor)

We made reservations for a 2.5 hour long ***** (Five-star) trip on the lobster boat Lulu with Captain John ($30 each).  We departed at 10:00  and were given great motion-sickness bracelets, which were 100% effective despite churning seas.  We saw double-breasted cormorants (Pic. 1/5865) and two types of gulls. 

These grey seals (Pic 2/5871) are the heaviest of all seals by far, and they were spy-hopping, which I thought only whales did.  Others were relaxing and eating, not disturbed by our presence at all.  They shared rocks with the harbor seals, a real marine Mutt & Jeff.  Harbor seals are about 5 feet long max.  The greys are up to 8 feet long and weigh over 900 pounds.

The Egg Lighthouse (Pic. 3/5881) is fully automated and runs on solar power.  The only lighthouse still manned is in Boston.  Senator Edward Kennedy got a bill passed that it would be manned forever.   It got its name of "Egg" because there are many ledges there that birds use for nesting.  The Native Americans used to take their birchbark canoes out to this rock and gather the eggs for their food.

The captain had to work to keep us from being sprayed by the rough seas, but these eider ducks and gulls are adapted to it. (Pic. 4/5884)  We saw a large, thick fogbank out there.  The captain cancelled the 3:00 cruise, so we're lucky we got to see this at all.

On our way back in, we oohed and aahed at this $2 billion yacht with a helipad.  (Picture 5/5906) It is owned by a hedge fund manager.  I tried to research its flag with the Union Jack in the left corner and what looks like islands on the lower right side, but all I can say for sure is that it's not Canadian.

Captain John talked non-stop for the whole trip.  He taught us all about the anatomy of the lobsters, how they are trapped, how they grow and molt, the proper way to eat a lobster, and how the industry is protected.  While other fishing industries are in terrible shape from over-fishing, Maine started protecting theirs 100 years ago through strictly enforcing their laws and licensing and education, and it is growing and thriving.  If they find a female with eggs, they notch her tail, and she is put back and may not be re-caught for 5 years until the notch re-grows.  There is a minimum and maximum weight.  They throw back 1/3 of their catch.

Lobsters are able to regenerate their claws when they are torn off in battle or when they are unable to molt completely and so they remove them.  It takes 5-6 years for them to regrow their claws.  Look at the disparity between this lobster's two claws. (Picture 6/5919)  China buys over 50% of the Maine lobsters because cold water lobsters are the best.

There is a wonderful genetic research facility here called the Jackson Institute that is studying these marine animals and how they regenerate limbs in an attempt to help our returning injured vets.  Capt. John says he has been on tours there many times, and he saw a mouse who had an ear growing out of his back.  Their scientists say that it's not a pipe dream--it will really happen, and it's not too far away.  They are researching many diseases, too. After the trip was over, Dean & I went to the Chamber of Commerce to try to schedule a tour (they give them twice a week), but the season is over.   I think a visit there might have been a highlight of my whole trip.  I wanted to spend time on their website learning, but you have to accept cookies, so I didn't.

Did you know there are fewer calories in a large 2-pound lobster than in a skinless chicken breast?  You just have to skip the drawn butter.  In my dreams, this is my new diet! 

We had lobster for a late lunch/early dinner at the West St. Cafe, which was reasonably priced for the area.  Their warm blueberry pie was wonderful.

We drove to the Abbe Museum in downtown Bay Harbor.  It was a waste of $16.  Their building is beautiful.  Their focus is not on teaching about the Native Peoples and how they lived.  It was about how their tribe has not been recognized by the federal government and how wronged they have been, which I'm sure is true.  There were many storyboards, but we were in and out in 15 minutes.  We do get free admission to their museum in Acadia National Park, which supposedly has relics.

We enjoyed the scenery as we drove the Acadia National Park's Park Loop.  We were trying to find the Abbe , but we never did, so we went up to Cadillac Mountain, the highest point on the Eastern Seaboard.  (Picture 7/5935)  It's hazy because the day was hazy.  The wind was blowing so hard that it was hard for Dean to walk.  We were going to wait for the sunset, but Dean decided he didn't want the picture that bad.  We're in for some rough weather for the next 4 or 5 days.

Staying  at Timberland Acres RV Park--$38  FHU  Good satellite or forested, you pick, great hosts
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #61 on: October 01, 2015, 09:20:20 PM »
Day 29      September 29, 2015       Trenton, Maine (near Bar Harbor)

I've been looking forward to seeing all the carved birds in the Wendell Gilley Museum.  He was a master carver and did good work, such as the long-eared owl (Pic 1/5937), the curlew (Pic 2/5940) and a surprise picture by Dean (Pic 3/5942).  It was good, but not great.  We've been fortunate to see so many wonderful sites, such as the Bird Art Museum in Wausau, Wisconsin.  The carvings there were astounding. 

The Acadia National Park Nature Gardens had about 10 small gardens, representing each of the areas plant life grows in--forest, beach, etc.

Next door was the "old" Abbe Museum, and it was so good.  The ticket taker was a very knowledgeable anthropologist, and there were many relics with excellent descriptions.  We went in with low expectations, and both of us would give it a 9. 

Can you imagine wintering in this birchbark home?  (Picture 4/5948).  The shape is the same as an igloo, and the anthropologist says it was even warmer than the longhouses of the Pacific Northwest.

The English wanted fish, furs, and land. The English kidnapped, robbed, cheated, and killed the Wabanaki. They even let their livestock eat the Wabanakis' gardens!  They refused to learn the Wabanaki language, so the whole burden of diplomacy was on the Wabanaki.

 The French treated them with respect.  They gave the chiefs great respect, as if they were royalty at home.  They were primarily interested in trade the converting the Wabanaki to Catholicism.  The Catholic missionaries brought Wabanaki spiritual beliefs into their teachings. They learned multiple languages and the Wabanaki learned French.  They intermarried with the Wabanaki.  Their children played important roles in alliances.  The French traded firearms, shot and powder, and they avoided trading alcohol.  The English did just the opposite.

The Wabanaki Confederacy was formed by five tribes who had been meeting together for centuries for social contacts and to fight their mutual enemy, the Iroquois.

Tonight we ate at the best lobster restaurant by far, the Union River Lobster Pot.   It was located on a knoll with lovely trees that led to the pretty Union River. The lobster was amazingly sweet and tender. Everything was delicious, and the prices were reasonable. I brought home enough for more than one more dinner.   I'd rate this a 10--don't miss. (Picture 5/5949)

Staying at Timberland Acres RV Park
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #62 on: October 01, 2015, 09:28:18 PM »
Day 30      September 30, 2015      Richmond, Maine (near Augusta)

We had a short, easy drive on good roads.  Then we went to the movies at Regal's Augusta 10.  Only $8, large reclining seats, with a convenient movable tabletop, and just as in live theatre, you choose your seat!  We didn't enjoy the movie, "Black Mass," but the theater was very comfortable.

Staying at KOA--$38, FHU, everything works well, including WIFI, forested so no satellite, spacious sites, terrible, deeply rutted, potholed roads   To be fair, the rain has been coming down hard.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #63 on: October 02, 2015, 12:40:46 AM »
Day 31      October 1, 2015      Richmond, Maine (near Augusta)

Today we visited the Capitol .   My notes said that they had tours on the hour, but since it is October, they only offer morning tours.  We had stayed at the RV making plans and the only tours we could make, the 11:00 and 12:00, had 4th graders on field trips, so we tagged along.  The kids were great; the guide, not so much.  We've found that volunteer docents are much more interesting.

As we approached the Capitol, I noticed that the flags flying over it were the U. S. flag and the POW-MIA flag, and there was no Maine flag.  That's a question I'd like to have asked about.  The Lady of Wisdom stands atop the dome.  She's covered in gold leaf.  She holds a pine bough torch in one hand and a pine cone in the other. (Pic 1/5965)

We skipped the 2nd floor because there was a big Capitol Employee Recognition Day being held there with a large crowd of people, so we didn't see the Governor's Office and Hall of Flags.

The terms for both Senators and Representatives are 2 years.  They meet from December to June (6 months) in the year they are elected, and from January to April in the non-election year, and they are paid less than $15,000/year (not a typo!).  They do receive medical insurance, but it's only for the time they are in session.  They have no office and no staff.

There are 151 representatives, and Maine is the only state to have Native American representation in the House of Representatives (Pic 2/5956), but they can't vote.  California, where I live, is a very diverse state, so I couldn't help but notice that all 186 elected members appeared to be Caucasian, and there were no Hispanic surnames.  However, this may be representative because 99% of the people we've seen in Maine are also Caucasian.  There are 45 women representatives.

Members have electronic voting, and they must vote yes or no; they can't abstain.  But, there was one very interesting feature--they can call in their vote.  They don't have to be there.  The House sessions are streamed to the web.  State Representative Richard Pickett (R), who represents the district that the visiting students live in, joined both tours to give the House explanation to the kids.  What a savvy man, especially in a low-population state!  He had his picture taken with both groups, too.

 The Senate (Pic 3/5958) has 35 members, 8 of whom are women.  There is no lieutenant governor.  The President of the Senate is an elected position, and if the governor can't govern, he steps in.  This is especially interesting because the governor and the president of the Senate have been feuding.  According to the newspaper, Governor LePage went so far as to call Sen. Thibodeau a "liberal."  And, they're both Republicans!

Seating for the public is along the periphery of the Senate, right there on the same floor, just a few feet away from the senators.  There is a gallery on the floor above, but visitors can't year what's being said because of poor acoustics.  The State Seal is in the Senate carpet (Pic 4/5962).  There's a shield, a pine tree with a moose laying down at the foot of it, a farmer resting on a scythe, and a seaman, resting on an anchor, a crest, the North Star, and the motto, "Dirigo," which means I direct or I lead.

This capitol appears to be very efficient and streamlined.  I know it had more stories to tell.

The State Museum is next door to the Capitol and had some interesting displays.  Admission was only $1 each.

We went on a leaf-peeping drive to Belgrade Lake.  There's more color each day, but the leaves still haven't popped. 

We returned to Regal's Augusta 10 to see "The Intern," which Dean and I both enjoyed very much.

Staying at KOA-- The terrible, deeply rutted, potholed roads were not filled in today, despite there being no rainfall and the sun being out.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #64 on: October 04, 2015, 10:48:19 AM »
Day 32      October 2, 2015      Auburn, NH (near Concord)

We had an easy, gorgeous 2-hour drive on interstates most of the way.  There were pretty trees that are getting serious about fall, and we saw the most intense color we've seen, though it's not near peak yet.  We saw "MOOSE CROSSING" signs twice.  What havoc that would play with cars doing 55.

Daytime highs have been in the mid 50's, and lows at night of about 40°, and I was bundled up in a blanket for most of the drive because the coach was cold.  Dean discovered that our heater wasn't working when we arrived, and he worked for two hours on it.  It's an Aqua-Hot, and it said the fluid was low, but Dean could see lots of fluid in the tank.  He will contact a repairman tomorrow.  The Aqua-Hot offices are closed until Monday. 

Staying at Calef Lake Camping Area--30 amps, FHU, pretty, heavily forested, no satellite reception, iffy cell service (one bar), nice hosts, 2:00 checkout time $111/3 days

Day 33      October 3, 2015      Auburn, NH (near Concord)

BRRRR!!  We both slept well in our warm blankets and sweat shirts last night, but everything we touch from the tile floor to the toilet seat to the tables is super cold.  Getting heat is our objective today.  Dean wanted to get a recommendation from the RV park, and their office didn't open until noon.  When he did get one, the phone just rang and rang.  So we decided to go to Dunkin' Donuts and use their Wifi.  On the way there, I got cell reception and found 2 places.  We got a nice gentleman at one who needed to contact a worker who works on heaters.  Long story short, he never did reach the man, and we spent a couple of hours at DD.  But, he did diagnose the problem over the phone, (it's a float that senses how full the tank is and acts as an emergency shut-off) so we're hoping that Camping World will have our part tomorrow.

Everything is closing earlier now, so we didn't have time to sightsee.   We went to see "The Martian," a great movie, at the local Regal, which has the same reserved lounge chair seating set-up as in Maine, which is very comfortable.

Today we saw regular gas at $2.01, and we saw Mobil at $2.08.  But, they go up 25 cents for each grade, whereas in California, the difference is usually 10 cents per grade.  Here they have a 93 octane super-premium, which we don't have at home.   Diesel is  $2.29 (lowest) to $2.45 (at Travel Plazas on the toll roads).

I was dreading another cold night in the coach, and necessity is the mother of invention.  I suggested to Dean that we stop at the Home Depot across the street from the theater and buy a heater.  What an idea!  I can't believe that neither of us thought of it before.  We are still dedicated to repairing our heater tomorrow, but tonight will be more comfortable.   I really want to see a couple of sights, too.

Staying at Calef Lake Camping Area
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Betty Brewer

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #65 on: October 04, 2015, 12:15:49 PM »
Linda,
I giggled at your being cold. We have an All King electric heater that runs almost all the time to take the chill off.  It oscillates and  has 3  levels of heat.  We could not be without it!  If you shut the door to  back it  heats up the small space in no time at all.  Of course it does not work when  you are not hooked up to power unless you run the generator.

Stay warm you two! We also saw and loved the movie Martian.

Betty Brewer

see where we are

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #66 on: October 05, 2015, 11:24:04 AM »
Good to hear from you, Betty!  We saw the temps in Boston this AM when we were at 39°, and it was 50° there.  Dean said, "Positively balmy!"  And, it's supposed to hit a high of 70° on Wednesday!  We are heading there now!

Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #67 on: October 07, 2015, 09:37:22 AM »
Day 34      October 4, 2015      Auburn, NH (near Concord)

We had a much more comfortable night with our new heater, though it's still chilly.  After spending the morning working on repairs, we had an enjoyable afternoon at the Currier Museum of Art.  It was high quality and just the right size.  Dean isn't big on art museums, and even he liked it.  They had several paintings by renowned European masters, but just one painting of each.  They had works by New Englanders and a special photographic exhibit on veterans of the war in Afghanistan.

There were good, short explanations by each painting.  This painting (Pic 1/5973) is of Anthony and Cleopatra.  They were disputing who spent more on their banquet, and she is removing her earring.  She plunged it into vinegar, causing it to dissolve, and thereby winning the argument by making her banquet the most expensive.  The other people in the painting are the painter's family.  Within one year, all of them but one were dead from the plague.

Most of the paintings had attractive bright, crisp colors.  In Picture 2/5976, the priest is reading a letter to the higher priest. (Picture 2/5976)  The bright red stands out.

Grandma Moses did this picture of the checkered house with amazing detail. (Picture 3/5979)

We saw small pieces by Paul Revere II (the famous rider), his father, who was also a silversmith and who mentored his son, and the master silversmith who taught him.  Each was of progressively higher quality.

We had a quick cup of soup at their nice cafe, and it was not only good, but warm (unlike the cafe).  Will I ever be warm again?

Staying at Circle CG Campground--30 amps, FHU, open air or forest, satellite-friendly
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #68 on: October 07, 2015, 09:55:25 AM »

Day 35      October 5, 2015      Bellingham, MA (sort-of-near Boston)

Today we took advantage of our 2:00 checkout time and got out early.  We  went to the capitol in Concord, NH.  (Pic 1/5983) On top of the dome is the Peace Eagle, who replaced the War Eagle about 50 years ago.  (Pic 2/5984)

There was no security check, something of which they are proud.  They told me earlier that they don't give tours, but we went to the Visitors' Center and asked.  The volunteer there arranged for someone to cover her, and by the end of the tour there were about 15 of us enjoying listening to her.

Concord's claim to fame is that they were the first state to adopt a state constitution, on January 5, 1776, 7 months before we declared Independence.  They are also the longest continuously operating capitol in the U. S.  In the Civil War, volunteers came to the Tour Office where we were standing to enlist.

Dioramas depicted important dates in their history.  One showed the British surrender of Ft. William and Henry on December 14, 1774.  Paul Revere II made his successful ride here when he rode to tell the colonists that the British were stockpiling arms and ammunition.  They attacked and captured the  goods, using them later to attack the British.  On Revere's later ride for which he is so famous, he was captured by the British.

There is a case dedicated to Alan Shepard, the first astronaut in space who took New Hampshire's flag to the moon and the only astronaut to fly both Apollo and Mercury missions.  He brought back chips of rock and another claim to fame.  He made the longest golf drive ever hit by anyone (he did it on the moon).

They love their generals, soldiers, and battles here.  They have a whole Hall of Flags with battle-worn regimental flags dedicated to their citizens who have fought.  They are especially proud of the 5th NH Regiment, who was the "most bloodied" regiment of the Civil War.  General John Stark is famed for his military prowess and saying, "Live free or die, for death is not the worst of evils."  Harriet Dane, a nurse, followed her New Hampshire boys.  At the end of the war, the veterans gave her a pension.  With that money, she bought land for the veterans of The Grand Army and built a regimental building to have reunions and vacation quarters for veterans.  They have honored her by putting up a painting of her.

Proud that they are truly "The People's House," New Hampshire pays their house members and senators $100/year, a government email address, mileage for up to 45 days, and no other perks--no medical insurance, office expense, etc..  They serve a 2-year term, with no limit.  The house has 400 members, the largest state legislature, with one representative for every 3,000 people.  Representatives sit in chairs reminiscent of my college days in lecture halls, but without the pull-up desk,  smaller than those in the theatre we were at last night.  They have just three buttons in front of them--one white one that they press to show their attendance and red and green buttons to vote.  (Pic 3/5986)  If they want to ask a question, they make a ? in the air with their hand.  If they want to talk, they make a quacking motion with their hands, and they walk down the aisle to stand at the front and speak into the one microphone, facing the rest of the assembly.  This seems very inefficient.

Both the house and senate are republican, and they have a Democratic governor.  The House works on Wednesdays and the Senate works on Thursdays, plus committee meetings on Fridays, from January to June.  Men are required to wear a jacket, tie, and an official nametag.

In the House, they honor John P. Hale, an ardent abolitionist.  Franklin Pierce is the only New Hampshire citizen to become President of the United States.  He was a strict constitutionalist, and slavery was permitted in the Constitution, so he did not go along with the abolitionists, despite New Hampshire being very much an abolitionist state.  When he retired, he encountered a lot of resentment from people, and you have to hunt to find the small state of Pierce, which was not allowed to be on Capitol grounds.  However, Daniel Webster, congressman from New Hampshire, U. S. Senator, and U.S. Secretary of State, has a place of prominence at the front of the Capitol.(Picture 4/5985)

The Senate has 24 senators.  They share a small clerical staff. (Picture 5/1991)

Dartmouth, their well-know university, was originally and Indian education school.  Even now, if you are an Indian of any tribe throughout the U. S. and you meet Dartmouth's requirements, you can attend for free.

Governor Maggie Hassen announced her candidacy for the U. S. Senate on the day we were at the Capitol, so ABC news was at the Capitol.  She often comes out of her office to greet schoolchildren.

One very unique feature of this state, is they have a 5-member elected Executive Council, (Picture 6/5996) which acts as an additional balance to the executive, legislative, and judicial branches.  They must unanimously approve any appointments,  bids or contracts over $5000, or gifts of land.  The British had done all those, and those colonists were adamant that it would not happen again.

New Hampshire has the first presidential primary where they elect a candidate by secret ballot instead of caucusing .  Each candidate has to come in person and apply at the Secretary of State's office and pay the $1000 fee.  One of the perks for the volunteers is getting to shake the candidates' hands.

We drove an hour-and-a-half of tree-lined, beautiful highway.  When we got here, Dean immediately tackled our heating problem once again.  One of his calls yielded a suggestion that he by-pass the float-control thingie by re-wiring, and he scheduled a permanent fix at our next stop.  HURRAH!  REAL HEAT--not just partial heat!  I am a happy camper!  I usually have the thermostat set for 70°, but it's at 74° until I thaw out.

Staying at Circle CG Farm Campground--30  amps, FHU, satellite friendly.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Marsha/CA

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #69 on: October 07, 2015, 12:22:10 PM »
Hi Linda, we are enjoying your trip log.....keep it up!
 
Just to make you feel better (or not), we left Thayne, WY and are now in Durango, CA; a long circuitous route back home to California. ;)   But Tim has been wanting to ride the Silverton/Durango railroad, so we are here until Friday morning then are hoofing it back home.

For the last few days it's been pouring down rain with heavy snow on the mountain tops surrounding Durango.  Lows in the mid 30s and highs in the high 50s.  Our heat pumps have been running; along with our furnace.  (BTW, I thought you had heat pumps on your coach?)  However hiking around Mesa Verde Nat'l Park in this cool weather means bundling up.

During the middle of September we had actually thought of heading to the east coast for the fall colors; but changed our minds.  I need more planning time than just "hit the road".

Stay warm!
Marsha~
2017 Heartland Mallard IDM231 Travel Trailer....Small but mighty.

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #70 on: October 08, 2015, 05:00:39 PM »

For the last few days it's been pouring down rain with heavy snow on the mountain tops surrounding Durango.  Lows in the mid 30s and highs in the high 50s.  Our heat pumps have been running; along with our furnace.  (BTW, I thought you had heat pumps on your coach?)  However

Thanks for the kind words.  We had two days that hit 70°,  Dean hexed that by wearing shorts, so today, the high was only 62°.  But, we can bundle up, and our coach is warm.  You brought interesting questions with your reply.  Dean says that it says "heat pump" on the heater, but he doesn't know if this model has one and he hasn't ever tried to use it.  We may explore that more, as I value being warm.  Thanks.  All is good now.  I have TV and heat.  We are working on internet, just need to download some updates to hopefully have it humming along, too.

Stay warm and dry.  I hope your train trip is everything Ken hoped it would be.

Happy trails,
Linda

Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #71 on: October 08, 2015, 05:05:02 PM »

Day 36      October 6, 2015      Bellingham, MA (sort-of-near Boston)

Today was a bright, warm 70°.  So Dean and I headed to Concord's Impoundment Area at Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge to see native plants, and hopefully animals.  The 2-mile walk around the impoundment yielded a huge beaver lodge (Pic 1/6011), and while we heard a splash, he didn't come out to greet us.  A lady we met on the trail said that she's seen him a few times, but she walks this or snowshoes this year-round.  We saw a spider web with a spring-like bottom on it made of the spider's silk.  We saw cute frogs who jumped on the trail ahead of us, and a shiny black-shelled turtle.  The ravens, great white egrets, and Canadian geese shared the impoundment and enjoyed flapping their wings vigorously while bathing in the same area.

It was a nice change of pace, and we enjoyed the day tremendously.

Staying at Circle CG Farm Campground--30 amps & water, clear skies so we have satellite
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #72 on: October 08, 2015, 05:17:25 PM »
Day 37      October 7, 2015      Bellingham, MA (sort-of-near Boston)

We spent the morning working with our satellite provider and downloaded some upgrades.  We now have heat, TV, and Internet! 

We changed out plans and drove 30 minutes to Rhode Island's Capitol in Providence.  I figured that tiny state would mean small capitol.  Not so!  It was absolutely spectacular.  From afar, we could see the gleaming dome (Pic 1/6042).  The figure at the top is Independent Man.  He clutches a spear in one hand and rests the other on an anchor.  Originally, it was supposed to have a statue of Roger Williams, the founder of Rhode Island, but no one could agree on what he looked like.

At most capitols, the visitors enter through a beautiful lobby.  The handicapped entrance/exit is a little less elaborate and offers a different view. (Pic 2/6041)  In this case, it was a sub-basement, and we could see two more floors below it.

It took 9 years (1895-1904) to build the Capitol and has 15 million blocks of marble.  It has the 4th largest self-supporting dome. (Pic 3/6014) The others are at St. Peter's in Vatican City, the Minnesota State Capitol, and the Taj Mahal.  The interior base of the dome, in raised gold letters, says "Rare felicity of the times when it is permitted to think what you like and say what you think."  All the gold in the Capitol, and there is a lot of it, is 24K gold leaf, so thin that it's applied with a small paintbrush.  High within the rotunda is a beautiful mural (in gold, of course) of Roger Williams colonizing Providence Plantations surrounded by fellow colonists and Narragansett Indians. (Pic 4/6040)  There are 4 large medallions under the dome featuring 4 women depicting Education, Justice, Literature, and Commerce. (Pic 5/6019)

Our next stop was the Royal Charter Museum & Library, (Pic 6/6015) where they usually keep the Royal Charter of 1663 granted by King Charles II.  It guaranteed Rhode Island settlers freedom of religion and the freedom to govern themselves.  It is written on sheep or goat skin, and it is currently out being restored, so we saw  a fine imitation.  It is so valuable that its value can't be assessed.  This library is open to the public.

The Senate (Pic 7/6021) has 38 members, most of them Democrats and 10 women.  Senators receive $15,000/year and work from January to June on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays.  Since most of them hold full-time jobs, they convene at 4:00 P. M.  At the beginning of the session, they may only meet for an hour, but at the end, it's no unusual for them to be still meeting at 10:00. A senate president is elected by the members. Both senators and representatives serve 2-year terms, with no limits. They are already 60% paperless.   The desks in both houses are originals.  The room is the original color, a light green.  Restorers removed 26 layers of paint to get to it.  The state seal is woven into the carpet. (Pic 8/6031)

The State Reception Room is where the governor holds all media and official functions.  It is the only room without a skylight.  It has a hand-painted sky scene on the ceiling.  The original Gilbert Stuart portrait of George Washington (Pic 9/6032)  in an elaborate gilded frame is on the wall, seemingly unprotected.  I had a print of this in my classroom when I taught 5th grade.  It is one of the few pictures of him standing.  Stuart was a Rhode Islander and was the leading portrait artist in America during Revolutionary times.  Also, there is a large painting of Major General Nathanael Green, a Rhode Islander who was Washington's second-in-command during the Revolution.  Every Inauguration Day , the Chief Sheriff, dressed in early 1800's clothing, reads the formal Proclamation of Election of the Governor, followed by a 19-gun salute on the State House lawn.

The House (Pic 10/6038) has 75 members.   It is also Democratic, and has 21 women.  The walls are covered with hand-woven tapestries.  In both houses, members must either vote "yes" or "no."
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #73 on: October 08, 2015, 05:19:05 PM »
More pictures
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
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2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

ArdraF

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #74 on: October 08, 2015, 06:55:39 PM »
Neat library!  Looks like a really nice capitol.

ArdraF
ArdraF
:D :D

HappyWanderer

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #75 on: October 08, 2015, 08:05:25 PM »
What a coincidence, we were in Providence today. Spent a good part of the day at Battleship Cove in Fall River, MA then on to the pumpkin festival at the zoo in Providence. If you're still in the area, Battleship Cove is worth a visit. We're at Fishermans Memorial state park in RI though Monday.

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #76 on: October 10, 2015, 09:38:31 PM »
Hi, Happy!

We'd love to meet up with you.  We're in Circle CG Campground in Bellingham, about 30 minutes from Providence.  But, we are going to do the Freedom Trail tomorrow (Sunday) in an attempt to avoid some of the crazy Boston going-to-work, going-home, going-to-scare-me-to-death traffic, complete with crazy pedestrians, construction, and drivers. We'll be here through Wednesday, and then move on to Plymouth.  We're going to be in Cape Cod and Connecticut, too.  Maybe we can connect at another site.  Where are you heading?
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #77 on: October 10, 2015, 09:45:43 PM »
Neat library!  Looks like a really nice capitol.

ArdraF

We really enjoyed it.  What a pretty capitol!  But, our favorite capitol library is the one in Des Moines.  That one was jaw-dropping awesome.  This library was very impressive, though.  My favorite part of the Providence capitol was the Gilbert Sullivan painting of George Washington.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Ken & Sheila

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #78 on: October 10, 2015, 10:30:24 PM »
CG's not far from our old stomping ground at Normandy Farms CG where we had several multi month stays when I was working as a consultant to a company in Attleboro.
Ken & Sheila
2009 Monaco Camelot 42 PDQ
2008 Jeep Liberty, 2006 Saturn Vue
Fur-ball kids: Ariel and Mia

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #79 on: October 10, 2015, 10:38:25 PM »
Day 38      October 8, 2015      Bellingham, MA (sort-of-near Boston)

 We wanted to go into Boston to the AAA at 125 High St. Mapquest said it would take 45 minutes and we left at 8:00.

The traffic on the drive in was awful, and the lanes expand at the toll booths and 8 toll lanes become 3 freeway lanes in about 500 feet.  Oh, and the exit we needed was on the extreme right about 100 feet after the tollbooth. The whole city of Boston is under construction--both buildings and streets.  Everyone double-parks because there is so little street parking, including the cops, whose cars were two deep blocking the street in front of their station, leaving only one traffic lane, with 3 streams of cars all heading for it.  Drivers use their horns first, gas pedal second, and brakes last--real games of Chicken are going on!  Pedestrians totally ignore the signals and dart out from between cars constantly without even looking.  Truly crazy!

 We thought it was odd when the same address letter-by-letter came up in our  Jeep's GPS, so we put it in my i-Phone's Mapquest, too.  They both took us to this residential area with scrunched wooden homes.  I looked at a parking sign and it mentioned Charlestown, which it turns out is a section of Boston.  I called AAA, and they told me they were downtown and gave me directions as if we lived there, starting with "Go to the South Station...," and I couldn't get her to stop talking because she had a 5-minute script and she was going to read every darned word, whether I understood it or not.  I think it's rude to hang up on people, but I finally did, and she was still rambling.  We put in the second 125 High St., and it got us there, but there was no parking except one public parking garage.  They charged $9 every 20 minutes.  But, we needed to know how to do the Freedom Trail and it couldn't be done on the phone, so we bit the bullet and ended up spending $27!  We were poorer in the pocket, but much richer with information, so it was money well spent.

By this time, it was after noon--4 hours to make a 45-minute drive and a 10-minute consultation with AAA, so we decided to go to the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library, in Boston, but away from downtown.  The building on the U Mass campus is gorgeous, sitting on a point jutting out into the bay.  I thought this would be an A+ site since I really admired the man, while acknowledging that there were weak points in his character.  There were lots of displays and videos, and they made you realize his many accomplishments in such a short period of time.  They showed nothing of the battle he fought with Addison's or of his liaisons, no signs of weakness, and in doing so, they failed to capture the total man. There were lots of displays about Bobby, Jackie, and Caroline.  I'd say it's a "Don't miss" attraction, but I expected it to grab my heart and bring back the feelings of loss that I had when he was assassinated. 

Don't eat lunch in their cafe'.  I had the saddest, driest panini ever, served on regular bread.  I tore it apart and just ate the slice of turkey inside.  Dean's hot dog was also just put in a piece of bread, but he had relish and mustard.

Day 39      October 9, 2015      Bellingham, MA (sort-of-near Boston)

The Internet was down again, so we decided to call our satellite provider and get it fixed for once and for all.  We started at 8:00 AM and finally had it resolved at 9:00 PM.   Hughes made a change in what satellite we should be using at 6:00 AM yesterday morning and didn't notify their customers.  What a nightmare!  They'd have us follow instructions, then wait 45 minutes.  We spent all day on the phone or waiting for 45 minute to expire. 

However, we were going to have to do this anyway, so we chose the right day to do it.  At noon, strong, cold winds came up, and they brought rain from 3:00 until 7:00 that pounded down pretty good.

Dean has to go up on the roof when it's dry and change the setting for our Bird-on-a-Wire still.  So, now we have Internet but no TV.  But, at least we have heat!
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Hfx_Cdn

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #80 on: October 11, 2015, 06:35:41 AM »
    Prior to 1921 there were no restrictions for Canadians to cross the border and find work, so many of Donna's relatives went to what was referred to as the "Boston States".  Given her love of genealogy and since a lot of the MA archives are located there, we over the years have spent many days at the JFK Library with her doing genealogy research.  The setting is gorgeous adjacent to Boston Harbour, and the displays interesting.  However, we always packed a lunch, so can't share any comments on their cafeteria.
    Unfortunately, around the corner from the AAA used to be Filenes Bargain Basement, what was one the US's most unique clearance centers.  When we first went there, there were no change rooms, and since the bargains were so great, women would strip down to their skivvies to try on clothes.  There have been several documentaries about the location, and it was always an afternoon's visit to outfit the kids for their school clothes.

Ed
Ed & Donna
Winter-Pinellas Park FL, Summer- Maritime Canada
2000 Coachmen Catalina 34' DP (owned 2004 to 2015)
2006 Jeep Liberty Toad

HappyWanderer

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #81 on: October 11, 2015, 08:13:40 AM »
Hi, Happy!

We'd love to meet up with you.  We're in Circle CG Campground in Bellingham, about 30 minutes from Providence.  But, we are going to do the Freedom Trail tomorrow (Sunday) in an attempt to avoid some of the crazy Boston going-to-work, going-home, going-to-scare-me-to-death traffic, complete with crazy pedestrians, construction, and drivers. We'll be here through Wednesday, and then move on to Plymouth.  We're going to be in Cape Cod and Connecticut, too.  Maybe we can connect at another site.  Where are you heading?

Linda, unfortunately we're headed home to Connecticut on Monday and back to work on Tuesday. Maybe we could meet up on your way through.

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #82 on: October 11, 2015, 09:44:37 PM »
      The setting is gorgeous adjacent to Boston Harbour, and the displays interesting.  However, we always packed a lunch, so can't share any comments on their cafeteria.
    Unfortunately, around the corner from the AAA used to be Filenes Bargain Basement, what was one the US's most unique clearance centers.  When we first went there, there were no change rooms, and since the bargains were so great, women would strip down to their skivvies to try on clothes.  There have been several documentaries about the location, and it was always an afternoon's visit to outfit the kids for their school clothes.

Ed

I hope I didn't hurt any feelings.  I just had such high expectations, and I thirsted for more from the JFK.  The Clinton and Nixon Presidential Libraries showed all facets and how they were mortal men.  It's really strange to think of JFK as a 90-year-old man now.  When you die young, you never age.

How interesting!  And, I bet Donna got high quality for low prices, always a thrill.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #83 on: October 11, 2015, 09:49:59 PM »
Linda, unfortunately we're headed home to Connecticut on Monday and back to work on Tuesday. Maybe we could meet up on your way through.

I'll let you know when we anticipate being where.  We are finding many parks closed and are completely reforming our itinerary.  I'll be doing a lot of calling tomorrow, then discussing with Dean, so I'll let you know our projected itinerary.  We anticipate being in Boston for another 3-4 days.  Our plans keep on being sabotaged.  Today, I called into the Freedom Trail to talk about parking and found out they were having a big parade for Columbus Day and closing streets as we spoke.  Most of the sites are closed on Mondays, so we have just one open place for tomorrow.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #84 on: October 12, 2015, 12:07:58 AM »
Day 40      October 10, 2015      Bellingham, MA (sort-of-near Boston)

We went into Cambridge to see MIT's museum and their displays about artificial intelligence. However, I especially enjoyed the brilliant students' and alumnae projects.  This soap bubbles machine was fascinating. (Pic 1/6045)  A fan blows air through the bubble mixture.  As they dry and pop, they change colors.  The explanation never explained their shapes.  It wasn't what we hoped for, but it had some interesting moments.  Parking was $10 for the first hour and $4 for each hour thereafter, but if you shopped at the grocery story that was INSIDE the parking structure, and was much bigger than most supermarkets, you got one hour of parking free.  So we bought bananas and bread.  Traffic in Cambridge was every bit as frustrating and nerve-wracking as Boston.  It, too, seemed to have construction everywhere.  Dean said the 5-axle crane was the largest he'd ever seen.

As a child, I spent a lot of time with my grandparents.  Their neighbors in 3 houses, two of them on either side of their house, were brothers and their families who had fled to the U. S. from Armenia.  These families were all very nice to me.  I learned a little about the genocide that occurred in 1915 by eavesdropping.  Their talks with my grandparents were hushed because they didn't want to upset speak graphically about the troubles in front of a child. I loved them, their culture, and their homemade Armenian food.

So when I planned this trip, I had to learn more by visiting the National Armenian Museum.  Dean saw all the exhibits in one hour, but I spent almost three hours because I was fascinated.  Armenia is an ancient country which flourished in the 7th and 8th century BC.   Repeatedly invaded by Turkey, their country has radically shrunk and their art and buildings have been destroyed.  The genocide in 1915-1922 has been acknowledged by all the our states, but never by our national government, because we have bases in Turkey which have been important in the control of the Soviet Union.  Armenians prize education and business success.  Their goal is always to own their own business, rather than working for someone else.  They have rapidly integrated into American society, which makes maintaining their culture difficult.  The greatest fear of the oldest generation is that the genocide which cost them over 80% of their population will be forgotten.  What they want is an apology from Turkey and the return of their land.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Marsha/CA

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #85 on: October 12, 2015, 10:16:41 AM »
Linda sorry to hear you are having troubles with Motosat.  That's why we dropped it several years ago...slow connection....very little tech help support and you always needed a clear sky with no trees.  We now use our cellphone hot spots or our Verizon air card with a cradlepoint router.  MUCH-MUCH faster and reliable.

We just arrived home late afternoon yesterday after leaving our place in WY, then going to Flaming Gorge, Moab, Arches National Park, Durango to ride the Durango/ Silverton Railroad and visit Mesa Verde National Park with the cliff dwelling...awesome!!!.  A great "touring" trip back home after being gone all summer.

BTW, sounds like you do  have heat pumps.  Just turn them on like you do your air conditioning.  They work great.

Marsha~
2017 Heartland Mallard IDM231 Travel Trailer....Small but mighty.

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #86 on: October 12, 2015, 01:43:10 PM »
Linda sorry to hear you are having troubles with Motosat.  That's why we dropped it several years ago...slow connection....very little tech help support and you always needed a clear sky with no trees.  We now use our cellphone hot spots or our Verizon air card with a cradlepoint router.  MUCH-MUCH faster and reliable.

We just arrived home late afternoon yesterday after leaving our place in WY, then going to Flaming Gorge, Moab, Arches National Park, Durango to ride the Durango/ Silverton Railroad and visit Mesa Verde National Park with the cliff dwelling...awesome!!!.  A great "touring" trip back home after being gone all summer.

BTW, sounds like you do  have heat pumps.  Just turn them on like you do your air conditioning.  They work great.

Marsha~

You guys give such rich info.  I copied the communications info.  Dean worked for Hughes and just loved the company until they sold his part of it to GM.  He was very fortunate, and he apparently had the right qualifications, and GM picked him up, the only guy in his division to be hired.  He was tenacious to get the new job.  He also is very, very loyal, and I'll bet you that if it were made by someone other than Hughes that we would have chosen your path a long time ago.  I did copy off your info & I'll put it in my Linda folder and remind him of our choices, if (when) we have an issue again.  The people at our new company since Motosat isn't any more, Mobile Satellite Technology, worked like dogs with us.  I'm not sure if the glitch was them or Hughes (I suspect it was Hughes.)  They called this morning to see if everything was working.  We had a couple of issues, and they got solved.

Believe me, I will remember about the heater.  I'll also have the tech that we see on the 19th explain to us exactly how we are supposed to use the heat pumps and when.

I'm so glad you guys had a great trip.  You deserve good times.

Thanks so much for your help!
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #87 on: October 12, 2015, 10:33:01 PM »
Day 41      October 11, 2015      Bellingham, MA (sort-of-near Boston)

The sun was shining when we woke up at 7:00, and it was 52°, with a promise of getting up to 68°.  We wanted to see the leaves, and we'd been told of a scenic drive that ended at  the city of Harvard and the Fruitlands Museum.  The leaves are 3 weeks late according to the locals, and the locals say they aren't all that pretty, but we think they are.  In some spots of our drive, there were whole areas of bright gold leaves.  More often we saw a bright red branch peeking out from a green tree.  The day warmed as we drove.  At some spots the trees formed an arch over the road.  Nature at its best!

At any other time of the year, I wouldn't say that Fruitland was worth spending a day and $24 to see.  It is beautifully situated at the top of a plateau looking over a large valley below. (Pic 1/6054)  The walking was challenging, as it was steep.  There were interesting art features as we walked down to the farmhouse.  This little girl enjoyed playing the windchimes (Pic2/6057)  We saw an American art museum with about 100 paintings and some very interesting and impressive woven art.  There was a Shaker museum which was used by the Harvard Shakers in 1794 as an office building to maintain commerce with the outside world by selling herbs, seeds, furniture, and brooms.

In the gift shop, I admired a beautiful handmade wooden trivet until I saw its price tag of $190!  The farmhouse (Pic 3/6058) was home to Louisa May Alcott.  Her dad and his partner gathered there in the hope of creating an austere, rural community based on Transcendentalist principals and to live off the "fruits of the land."  It has the feel of an artistic community.

When we came home, we met up with an RVing group from South Connecticut, and they were a rich source of information.

Staying at Circle CG Farm Campground--30  amps, water, satellite friendly.

Day 42      October 12, 2015      Bellingham, MA (sort-of-near Boston)

Our satellite company called this morning and worked with Dean for a while on fine tuning our system, and it works like a charm.  Dean worked for a while on the GPS and our back-up camera which isn't working.  I worked on modifying our plans based on the information I got at campfire last night.

It was a gorgeous fall day, and Sherlock loved having the door open.  It seems like all our Boston attractions are closed on Monday or because of Columbus Day.

In the late afternoon, we went to the nearby Plainridge Park Casino.  It is only 5 months old, and we had a great, profitable evening.  All casinos in Massachusetts are smokefree!

Tomorrow we tackle Boston traffic again.

Staying at Circle CG Farm Campground--30  amps, water, satellite friendly.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #88 on: October 14, 2015, 09:19:13 AM »
Day 42      October 12, 2015      Bellingham, MA (sort-of-near Boston)

When we were in Paducah, KY, a couple of years ago, we went to the National Quilt Museum and were amazed.  So, going to the New England Quilt Museum was a "Must See."  It is a small building, but the quality of quilts in a special exhibit by renowned quilter Caryl Bryer Fallert was excellent.  I loved the brilliant colors she uses--definitely not like the patchwork quilts your grandmother made.  They are really works of art.  She machine quilts because the quilts are so complex that it would takes years to do one quilt.  The pictures give an impression of their beauty, but in person they were even more spectacular.

Pic 1/6059  "Birds of a Different Color"  She used over 100 different colors of thread.

Pic 2/6060  "On the Wings of a Dream" is about starting a new life over in a new place after she and her husband realized their dreams.  They bought a place with a farm (his dream) and a studio for her quilting (her dream).  A few months later, he unexpectedly passed away.  This is her first quilt after his death, and she pursued her childhood dream of taking ballet lessons for the first time.

Pic 3/6061  There are the obvious colorful dancers, but there are transparent dancers that are created just through stitches.

Pic 4/6063 "Migration #2" is about what she imagines it would feel like to fly with a flock of migrating birds of no particular species.  Flight represents a feeling of freedom.

Pic 5/6068  "Solar Eclipse" is showing that the few minutes during a solar eclipse are when astronomers are able to observe solar storms in the Corona of the sun.

Pic 6/6070 "New Dawn" was my favorite.  The phoenix symbolizes the ability of beauty to rise out of decay and destruction.  It was made from metallic fabrics (I didn't even know there were such things!) and sewn with metallic thread.

There was also a display of quilts made within the last year, but inspired by quilts from the Civil War Era (1850-1865).  My favorite was Pic 7/6072.

Staying at Circle CG Farm Campground--30  amps, water, satellite friendly.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

ArdraF

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #89 on: October 14, 2015, 03:14:53 PM »
Extraordinary colors in those quilts!  Not a quilter myself but sure enjoy their beauty and the wonderful fabrics.

ArdraF
ArdraF
:D :D

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #90 on: October 22, 2015, 03:42:33 PM »
We are finally not parked in trees.  We thought our internet was faulty, but we're at Mohecan Sun, and everything is working great.  I will post as quickly as possible.  I still have to coordinate pictures, etc.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

HappyWanderer

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #91 on: October 23, 2015, 02:00:15 PM »
Good to hear from you,  I was thinking about you on those nights when the temperatures dropped into the teens. Thought maybe you caught the express to California.

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #92 on: October 24, 2015, 12:51:46 AM »
Good to hear from you,  I was thinking about you on those nights when the temperatures dropped into the teens. Thought maybe you caught the express to California.

We were super cold, as you'll see from some of my posts.  But, all is good now.  Thanks for your good thoughts.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #93 on: October 24, 2015, 12:59:17 AM »

Day 44      October 14, 2015      Bellingham, MA (sort-of-near Boston)

We braved Boston traffic and spent a full, painful day, both for our bodies and our pocketbook, in Boston.  Parking several blocks away from the sites we wanted to see cost us $36 for the day!  But we couldn't take public transportation because of my scooter.  It was cold and windy, so we tried to make good time but were thwarted at every turn.

The streets were originally cowpaths and meander at strange angles up the hill. The streets have one name on the right and another on the left.  Maps are not very helpful.  The streets and sidewalks are either bumpy bricks or cobblestones, some of which are missing, making "potholes."  All sidewalks are angled toward the street, so keeping my scooter in a straight line killed my hands and shoulders.  Curbcuts for my scooter were often non-existent, so I would disembark and Dean would help me cross the street walking, then lift the front off the sidewalk, pull it forward, and lift it up on the other side of the street.  I previously thought of Boston as a progressive city of intelligent people.  We have never in our travels throughout 48 states encountered even a little town with such problems.  However, Bostonians are wonderful people.  They would see us pondering over the map and stop and give us directions.

Our first disappointment was that we couldn't go into the Old State House (1713) (Pic 1/6077) because it wasn't handicapped accessible--lots of steep steps.  We've encountered this kind of thing in other states, but usually they have installed a ramp or have taken video so I can see what it's like.  Nothing here.

After the Revolution, the leaders wanted a larger State House (Pic 2/6079), at the summit of Beacon Hill on land that had been a cow pasture for Governor John Hancock.  The cornerstone was laid on July 4, 1795 by Governor Sam Adams and Paul Revere, Grand Master of the Masons, and was finished in 1798..  The stone was drawn by 15 white horses, one for each of the states of the Union at that time.  The capitol cost $133,333.33.

There have been some major additions since then.  The capitol dome was originally made of wood and shingles.  Paul Revere & Sons coppered the dome in 1802 to prevent water leakage.  But it turned green.  So, seventy years later, they gilded the dome with 23-carat gold leaf for the first time, costing $2862.50.  The most recent gilding, in 1997, cost $300,000.

Just 80 years after its dedication, the legislature said the State house was too small.  Some wanted to build a new capitol in the geographic center of Massachusetts, but they decided to expand the original.  They had painted the original capitol yellow, so the addition was made of yellow brick.  In 1917, they added two white marble wings to the east and west. In the 1920's, they scraped the 26 layers of paint off the original and returned it to its original red color, so now the capitol is 3 different colors--red, yellow, and white. Picture 3/6092) is today's capitol.

Lincoln hated full-length portraits of him because he was self-conscious about his height.  There were only 4 done, and they were done after he died.  A portrait's price was determined by the number of limbs painted, and from that we get the saying that something cost "an arm and a leg."  This portrait was drawn from the $5 bill.

Nurses' Hall houses a statue of an Army war nurse (no particular nurse) and honors all the women of the North during the Civil War.  The hall is dedicated to Clara Barton, all the Civil War nurses, and Louisa May Alcott, who wrote about them.  On the walls are several impressive paintings about the start of the American Revolution--the Boston Tea Party and Paul Revere's ride.  But, my favorite was of the fiery orator James Otis who is pictured arguing against the Writs of Assistance, which let the British soldiers come into the colonists' homes and search for smuggled goods. He didn't receive money, even though it was offered from the Boston merchants who retained him.  He stood up for what he believed.

Like most New England states, Boston has a Hall of Flags which houses copies of the return of the regimental flags at the end of the Civil War.  They have put the originals in an environmentally-controlled storage area, and they are going to make new cabinets that are climate-controlled.  They have flags from the Spanish-American War, World Wars I and II, the Korean War, the Berlin emergency, and the Vietnam War.  No longer are there state regiments. There are lots of beautiful, historical murals here, too.   The French decorated the Massachusett's flag of the 104th U. S. infantry regiment because of their valor, the one and only time they've done that for a foreign government.  This is shown in a mural.  (Picture 4/6086)

Massachusetts is especially proud of the 6th regiment from the Civil War.  They were the first to respond that they were ready to serve when Lincoln called for volunteers.  They were the first to shed blood, too.  They have a pretty memorial as well as a large, beautiful mural.

In 1884, Governor Butler made the journey alone from the front door of the State House down the front steps, establishing the tradition of the "Long Walk."  Since then, the middle doors of the State House are opened only to allow a governor who is ending a term of office to depart, or an active head of state to enter.  Even JFK entered through the side door because, while he had been elected President, he had not yet been sworn in.  The president of Peru made the walk two years ago.  William Howard Taft is the last U. S. president to enter here.

There are 160 members of the House of Representatives (125 Dem-35 Rep).  They vote electronically with "yea" or "nay" buttons, and their vote is reported on an electronic board.  Members of both houses serve for 2 years.    By law, they must meet every 3 days (72 hours)--regardless of holidays, etc.  Hanging over the public gallery is the famous Sacred Cod, symbolizing the importance of the fishing industry in early Massachusetts.  It is the third one, as the other two were stolen.   It was given to the House in 1784 by a Boston merchant.  The House was in session, so we couldn't take any pictures.

There are 40 members of the Senate (34Dem-6Rep), and 39 of them sit in a circle of desks.  The 40th, the Senate President, is elected and sits at the rostrum under the golden eagle. (Picture 5/6089)  Traditionally, this post goes to the most senior senator, regardless of party.  Voting is done by voice.  The bust at the front of the chamber was thought to be of Samuel Adams.  However, Lafayette corrected them when he commented, "That's the Washington I knew."  Lafayette was a great friend of the American people,  He came to Boston to help George Washington.  In 1778, he cut off the British retreat, and without  his actions the colonists would not have won the Revolutionary War when they did or not at all.  He wanted to be buried in American soil, so Massachusetts packed a boxful of dirt and shipped it to France when he died.  He is recognized with a bust near the visitors' area.   Not to be outdone by the House, the Senate adopted the "holy mackerel" to hang in their house.  (Picture 6/6091) The Senate is the center of Boston, and the place from which all other places in Massachusetts are measured.

Massachusetts is proud that they were anti-slavery.   In 1853 during a U. S. Senate session, General Sumner who was a United States senator from Massachusetts, gave a speech called "Crime Against Kansas."  He insulted every delegate from South Carolina.  Two days later, while he was signing copies of his speech, Preston Brooks, a U. S. representative, picked up a brass-tipped cane and hit him over the head 30 times.  He was trapped, seated at his desk, and he finally was able to rip his desk out of the floor and escape.  He spent two years recovering.  Massachusetts did not elect anyone to replace him.  They felt that his absence would serve a purpose.    When he died, he laid in state here.

We timed our visit to the Governor's Office waiting room well because Governor Charlie Baker came through as we were looking at the portraits of recent governors.  Each governor chooses to put the portrait of their favorite past governor in the office to watch over them and guide them.   Gov. Dukakis chose Samuel Adams, and Governor Romney chose John Hancock.  There are no term limits for any politicians.  Dukakis served the longest, at 12 years, but they were not consecutive terms.  In second place is John Hancock, with 11 years, also not consecutive. They have had one woman governor, but she was lieutenant governor who got elevated and was not elected to the office. The governor is republican.

Massachusetts has had a series of state seals and they have beautiful stained glass replicas in a large window. (Pics 7 & 8/6081 & 6085)  The current motto is in Latin and means "By the sword we seek peace, but peace only under liberty."

Afterwards, we went to Faneuil to take the ranger-led tour of the Freedom Trail.  However, this was not available to me because of the condition of the sidewalks, streets, and lack of curbcuts.  Faneuil Hall was where Bostonians protested the taxation policies of the British, as well as serving as a marketplace for the local townspeople to market their goods.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #94 on: October 25, 2015, 11:11:44 AM »

Day 47      October 17,  2015   Bellingham, MA

We decided to visit Plymouth as a day trip since there were only 3 places we wanted to visit.  The Pilgrim Hall Museum is the oldest continuously open museum in the United States.  They only allowed us to photograph the entry pictures (1,2,3/6098, 6099, 6100).  I was fascinated by all that I learned today.  They had many Pilgrim and Plymouth real artifacts.

In 1532, Henry VIII declared that the English church would be independent of the pope, and he formed his own church.  Later, in the 1500's, some English believed that reforms were necessary to "purify" the church.  In the 1600's, everyone had to be a member of the Church of England and pay their tithes.  If they didn't, they were guilty of treason and were imprisoned,  burned at the stake, or beaten, so they left for Holland.  After a few years, their children started to assimilate and become "Dutch children."  They were intermarrying, and the parents became concerned. 

So the Puritans bought the Speedwell in Holland and leased the Mayflower in England to bring them to the New World.  The Mayflower came with a captain, crew, and other passengers who didn't believe in the Puritan ways. The Speedwell leaked so badly that they returned to England three times, and they decided to send the Mayflower over alone.  Some of the Puritans had to wait for a later voyage.  It took 10 years to transfer most of the Puritans to Plymouth.  The Mayflower was an old ship designed to take freight, so there were no beds or comforts.  At one point, the main beam cracked and had to be repaired using a large iron screw.  Everyone, even the kids, drank beer.  In England, if you drank water, it might kill you.  They ate salted meats and hardtack on the voyage.  A baby, Oceanus Hopkins, was born.  The trip took 66 days.

The Puritans were given a patent giving permission for them to settle in "the northern parts of Virginia." Anyone wanting to settle had to have permission from the king of England to settle.  When they landed at the wrong spot, now Providence Harbor, they were almost out of beer.  Scouts were sent out to explore Cape Cod and find a spot to settle.  An exploring party sailed up the coast and chose Plymouth, where they found fresh water in a spring and called it "sweet water."  Scouts also came on a place where the Native Americans stored corn underground in baskets, and they confiscated it to use for  seed.  They decided to petition the king for a new charter for the new location.  They never received one.

 Some of the passengers wanted to go their own way when they landed, but they realized they needed everyone to be able to survive, so they wrote the Mayflower Compact.  They all agreed to work together and share. The Compact allowed them to govern themselves in a democratic fashion.

The Puritans bought land from the Native Americans, but the natives expected to continue to use the lands' resources.  When the colonists built fences, it caused problems.

In 1685, the colonial government was restructured and charters were revoked.  Plymouth Colony became part of the United Colonies of New England.  Plymouth was not given its own charter.

The first exhibit room was fascinating!  It told about how the Puritans (They were not called Pilgrims until the 1800's) handled their funerals.    Governor William Bradford logged the trip and referring to Scripture, he wrote, "they knew they were pilgrims" in reference to a verse in Hebrews.  But it was 200 years later that the term Pilgrim was popularized.  It is likely they never ever heard the word "Pilgrim."  Passengers on the first 4 ships were called "First Comers." 

In the funerals of the 1630's, they "carried and buried" you on the same day you died.  Clothing was too expensive to be buried with the dead.  The body was cleaned and dressed in a simple long shirt.  Embalming was forbidden by Puritans in England, but it was occasionally done in New England.  The body was wrapped in a wool or linen shroud, and tied at the above the head and below the feet with rope.  Flowers or sprigs of rosemary were wrapped with the cloth to mask the odors.  There was no ceremony or prayers.  They came together dressed in black at the tolling of a bell, carried the deceased to the grave, and stood silently as the grave was filled in with dirt. If there was enough time and money, a wooden coffin was used.  It had a swinging door at one end for those who couldn't afford it, so it could be used many times.  These may have been used in New England during the plague.  The descendant's estate paid for the grave diggers.   Gravemarkers were simple and just had the name and year of death.

Burial grounds were set apart at the town's founding.  They often did double duty as cow pastures and were neglected.  Sometimes graves were dug at random locations, but usually families were grouped together.

As they became more established, they published "broadsides", printed elegies of important people.  At the top, there were crossed bones, winged skulls, coffin pictures, a pick, axe, and shovel that were crossed, and the words "Remember Death."  They made mourning rings of gold with a hollow space for the deceased's hair, and see-through spaces in the ring to see it.  These were given out to guests as mementos, though more often they were just for the wife or immediate family.  They had the name and date of death engraved on these small rings.  They were kind of creepy!

In the early 1800's, descendants of the early Puritans created much more elaborate obelisks and tombstones honoring their forefathers.

In the art area, there was a spectacular large oil painting of "The Landing of the Pilgrims" by Henry Sargent. He was a forefather of the more famous John Singer Sargent. It has hung on the wall in Pilgrim Hall since 1824.  The museum recently spent 2.5 months restoring and cleaning it and re-gilding the frame.  The Pilgrims landed on December 12, 1620.  There was no mention of Plymouth Rock in the 17th century records.  The Pilgrims were not met by any natives.  Not until March, 1621, did they meet their first "Indian," Samoset, who strolled into their village almost naked.  He brought Massasoit, the sachem (chief), and they made a treaty for 50 years.  It is the only treaty with Europeans that was never broken.

 In 1741, a 95-year-old man identified Plymouth Rock as the Pilgrims' landing spot.  He had known several Pilgrims.  So, it's just hearsay.

When the Sons of Liberty moved Plymouth Rock in 1774, it broke in two.  The top was brought to Town Square and then to Pilgrim Hall, where I touched it today.  The bottom is at the waterfront.

Longfellow's poem, "The Courtship of Miles Standish," was written in 1858.  The true history of it is that Priscilla's parents both died in the first winter.  51 of 102 Puritans died that first winter, but 25 of the 35 children survived, and two more were born.  Priscilla married John Alden.   Miles Standish was a widower, and legend told of his love for Priscilla.  He remarried later.

The spinning wheel was a faulty symbol of the Puritans.  There were no sheep in Plymouth Colony to give them the wool, and growing flax was not feasible.   I taught my students so much misinformation.  I wish I could retract those words.

We drove about a mile to the waterfront, where we saw "the rock" (Picture 4/6103) and had lunch at a restaurant famous for their fried lobster.  We eat almost no fried food, so that is probably why I didn't care for it at all.

We drove about 15 minutes to Plimouth Plantation (not a typo).   400 years ago there were no set rules for spelling, and writers of the time spelled phoenetically.  Sometimes they intentionally used different spellings of the same word on the same page.  This is the spelling most frequently used by Governor William Bradford in his history.  The difference also helps differentiate the Museum  from the modern town of Plymouth.

PP is a reconstruction of the original Plymouth area including a Wampanoag homesite with real Native Americans making items as they would have been made then.  They know their history and were very interesting.  The Wampanoag (pronounced Wampanaaak) were the only Native People who lived alongside the Pilgrims. The Wampanoag in Picture 5/6109 is sitting in a shade structure that they would have built in the summer, kind of like our patio covers.  Picture 6/6110  is a typical summertime home, with a smokehole in the top.  Picture 7/6111 is the typical wintertime home, with multiple layers of bark and a protected area which keeps the wind from blowing in through the front door (deerskin)

At the Craft Center, a large building, the Pilgrim crafts (knitting, pottery making, bread making, candle dipping) were demonstrated. There was a fort/meetinghouse that was interesting, especially the windows.

We found humor in the Mooflower (Picture 10/ 6116).  In 2006, a CowParade was held in Boston to raise money for cancer cures.  There were 200 life-size pows who were positioned so they were "grazing" the streets.  This was the exhibit from the PP.

The 1627 Pilgrim Village had 16 building with re-enactors who were also very knowledgeable and skilled.  (Pictures 8 & 9/6113/6114)  The whittler here was making a scoop for grain.  It was bitter cold (40's) and a breeze blew through us, so we hurried through and didn't enjoy this the $48 it cost us.  It was well done.  We opted to return to our warm car instead of going down to the Mayflower II.

13 days at one campsite is a new record for us.  Boston area has a lot to do, and our camp is at least an hour from most attractions (depending on traffic).

Staying at Circle CG Campground.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #95 on: October 25, 2015, 11:23:31 AM »
More pictures...
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #96 on: October 25, 2015, 11:38:28 AM »

Day 45      October 15,  2015   Bellingham, MA (sort-of-near Boston)
      
Today we went into Salem to learn about the "witch trials."  We started at the NPS Visitors' Center and saw a short, interesting film.  Salem Village (agricultural area around Salem) was known for a lot of disputes, and they were in big conflict with Salem Town.  In 1672, the villagers votes to hire their own minister since many of the arguments were over church privileges and practices.  Their first 2 ministers in the next 10 years stayed only a few years each because the congregation didn't pay them their agreed-upon salary.  The next minister left after the church in Salem refused to ordain him.  In 1689, the villagers agreed to hire Samuel Parris.  He was to be paid 1/3 in money and 2/3 in "provisions."  They granted him the deed to the parsonage and two acres just 4 months later.  He was filled with failures.  He had failed in two businesses when everyone else with the same businesses had thrived and dropped out of Harvard.  He viewed this as his last chance to have a successful life.  His enthusiasm caused his congregation to grow initially, but during services, he shamed members of  his congregation over minor infractions.  Villagers were expected to go to church for 3-hour sermons every Wednesday and Sunday.  His membership numbers declined.  Villagers were supposed to pay the ministers' fee monthly, no matter what, but they didn't.

A beggar woman came to the Parris's home, and Samuel decided she was responsible for his problems and therefore a witch.  His daughter had a "fit", and therefore he felt this woman had put the devil in her.  When people got sick or had misfortune or his daughter had another fit, he proclaimed this to be the work of a witch.  Later, his daughter admitted that she faked her fits.  In the next year, 14 women and 6 men were executed, 19 by hanging and 1 by crushing (putting heavy stones on top of him).  Samuel Parris and his family left the village and the ministry.

In modern times, a memorial was built to those innocents next to the graveyard.  It is a series of benches with each "witch's name," and method of execution.  (Picture 1)

We went to lunch at Turner's Seafood, which is known for lobster pie and lobster bisque.  My lobster bisque and Dean's clam chowder were excellent.  Our waitress said that she didn't believe in ghosts (past tense).  One corner of the restaurant is on the spot in an orchard where a witch named Annie was hung.  Our waitress said that she started hearing someone calling her by her birth name, a name no one else knows but her.  She has heard this several times, and she is now a believer in ghosts.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

ArdraF

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #97 on: October 25, 2015, 05:05:50 PM »
Linda, your narratives are so interesting!  Loved your comment about wishing you could take back some of what you told your students.  It makes you wonder what else we were told that wasn't quite accurate!  We visited Plimouth Plantation many years ago and really enjoyed it.  Glad to see it's still an interesting place to visit.  It looks like the weather is nice with blue skies and sun.

ArdraF
ArdraF
:D :D

HappyWanderer

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #98 on: October 25, 2015, 10:20:31 PM »
It's interesting to note that the Wampanoag spoken language had been dead for over a hundred years. About 20 years ago, tribal members started a project to bring it back and teach the members. There's quite a bit about it online and it makes good reading.

My grandfather was Wampanoag and had an extensive collection of Native American artifacts, which were donated to several museums upon his death.

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #99 on: October 26, 2015, 02:01:40 AM »

Day 54      October 24,  2015   Uncasville

The Pequot tribe is most famous for owning the largest casino in the United States, Foxwoods, which employs 12,000 people..  This has enabled them to build the Pequot Museum, which I think is the best Native Peoples' museum in the United States.  It is a gorgeous building, which has an observation tower.  (Picture 1/6201) They incorporate respect for the Earth and all its people throughout.  Admission was $30/2 people. 

When we first entered, we needed to eat lunch.  The "Indian" taco that I had and the burger that Dean had were good, but the best part was that the paper plates were compostable (and they do compost them) and the knife and fork were wooden, which would easily break down, too.  There was no junk food available.  The taco bread was whole grain.  The chips (we didn't buy any) were baked and multi-grain.

We were told that we could take pictures, but we couldn't use flash, so I apologize for the dark quality of some pictures.  We saw a 36-foot long dugout mishoon (canoe) that Pequot made from a tulip poplar tree in the spring of this year.  They chose a tall, straight tree, and felled it with carefully controlled fires around the base.  Then they removed the bark and branches.  Burning logs were placed on top of the tree, and the smoldering fire would hollow out the tree.  Then they used shells or stones to chip out the charred wood.  They used a scraper or quahog shell to smooth the canoe.  They put a big beak on the front of it to help break the waves.  These canoes were very sturdy.  Building a 12-foot long mishoon would take one man 10-12 days.(Picture 2/6182)

Originally, the Pequot were hunters and gatherers.  But, they also planted gardens and fished from their mishoons.

Epanow was captured in 1611 and escaped in 1614.  He outwitted his captors with promises of gold on Nope (Martha's Vineyard).  Captain Hobson brought him to his home harbor, and 4 members of his tribe brought out items to trade.  While they were on board, they hatched an escape plan.  They left, and the next day, Epanow dove off the ship and mishoons with many warriors rained arrows on the sailors so he could get away. 

We viewed an interesting 30-minute film. In 1614, Captain John Smith and his sailors scouted New England.  Patuxet (Plymouth) was a Wampanoag village of about 2,000 people.  As they were ready to leave, Thomas Hunt tricked and captured 27 Wampanoag natives, including Squanto by offering to trade knives, combs, pots, glasses, coats, and blankets for furs.  They were their tribes best hunters.  He sold them into slavery in Spain.  Squanto was exploited as a "wonder" for people to gawk at.  Between 1616-1619, the Wampanoag of Patuxet were all killed by disease.  When Squanto returned in 1620, he found the village empty.  Other Pequots were living in nearby areas.

The English defended their kidnappings by saying they were rescuing them from the wilderness, that they needed to be converted to Christianity, that they needed to learn Native customs and language, to display them for the curious, and to sell them into the slave trade.

 The 1630s were a time of increasing troubles between the Pequot and the colonists living in the Connecticut River Valley and Massachusetts Bay. The English, Dutch, and the Pequot all wanted control of the beaver trade in Connecticut.  It was very lucrative.  There were  disagreements, and in 1634, the Dutch kidnapped a Pequot sachem (chief).  The Pequot retaliated 2 years later by killing an Englishman, John Stone. The English demanded "the head" of the man who killed Stone, and the Pequot would not hand him over.  The English allied themselves with the Pequot's old enemies, the Narragansett.  The Narragansett did not believe in killing children and women, and the English promised to abide by their agreement not to do so.  At Fort Saybrook, the Indians drew the English out of the fort, and then the Pequot were hidden in the trees, and they dropped down atop the soldiers.   In late 1636, the English attacked a Pequot village.  The Narragansett were supposed to be the second wave.  The English burned Pequot wigwams, destroyed crops, and killed 12 or 200 or 600 Pequot (depends on which of their signs you believe), including women and children, breaking their deal with the Narragansett.  The Pequots retaliated with attacks on English settlements.  In 1637, the Pequots took two girls hostage and killed nine colonists.  Their leaders knew they were in danger.  So families gathered up their essential possessions, and warriors took the women and children by mishoon to Long Island, where they could be protected by friends.  Captured Pequot were sent to England as slaves or given to the Narragansett as slaves.  They were never one people again.  They are two nations now.

The Pequot have worked hard to preserve traditional practices and learn as much as possible about their ancestors' way of life.  They have a large research center.  They support cultural festivals, special event days, and performances by Foxwoods Dance Troupe and the Mystic River Singers. They teach their kids traditional stories and crafts, like beading, ceramics, and making regalia.  They wear traditional attire on special days.  They are entitled to use eagle feathers.  The eagle is considered sacred because he carries prayers to the Great Spirit in the Sky.  The Pequot support the American Indian Indigenous Games where Natives compete in track and field, swimming, basketball, and archery.

One display area has Earth creation stories from many of the major tribes in the United States.  As we walked through glaciers, we saw displays of geology and animal life of long ago. 

They re-created a Pequot village of the 1600s. (Pictures 3, 4, 5/6188, 6191, 6196).  There are about a dozen scenes of excellent quality.

The Pequot are governed by a 7-member Tribal Council, led by a Council Chairman and an Elders Council, which is composed of all tribal members 55-year-old or older.  The Tribal Council makes laws about the tribe and its property, manages natural resources, maintains relations with other tribal nations, and the local, state, and federal government.  The Elder Council advises the Tribal Council and determines membership.  They have the power to deny access to tribal property to anyone.

The Pequot now own hotels, build high-speed passenger ferries, and own golf courses and restaurants.  From their casino profits and the above, they fund a child development center, a tribal health center with all the latest and best, a post office, housing for members, and a community center with lots of activities.  They have a 2-year college and they provide scholarships so their young can advance. They contributed $5 million to a new beluga whale exhibit at Mystic Aquarium and $10 million to the Smithsonian Institute for a new National Museum of the American Indian, $2 million to the 1985 Special Olympics that was held in the area, and much, much more locally.

There was so much more I would have enjoyed learning about, but they are closed Sunday-Tuesday. 

Boondocking at Mohecan Sun Casino.  Free.  Very Nice.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #100 on: October 26, 2015, 02:04:15 AM »
Linda, your narratives are so interesting!  Loved your comment about wishing you could take back some of what you told your students.  It makes you wonder what else we were told that wasn't quite accurate!  We visited Plimouth Plantation many years ago and really enjoyed it.  Glad to see it's still an interesting place to visit.  It looks like the weather is nice with blue skies and sun.

ArdraF

We've had really cold, windy, freezing days, and some nice high 60s days.  Plimouth was a bitterly cold day, and we would have stayed longer and learned more if the weather had been better.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #101 on: October 26, 2015, 02:09:08 AM »
It's interesting to note that the Wampanoag spoken language had been dead for over a hundred years. About 20 years ago, tribal members started a project to bring it back and teach the members. There's quite a bit about it online and it makes good reading.

My grandfather was Wampanoag and had an extensive collection of Native American artifacts, which were donated to several museums upon his death.

Native groups have "lost" so much, and it can't be retrieved.  One of the things that I admired about the Pequot Museum was that they were honest and said, "Based on this and this and this, we believe......"  At other "Indian" museums, they backfill a lot and present it as truth.  It is so sad that they can't get their culture and language back.  I am so glad that your grandfather's artifacts got to good places.  Research is a key feature and heavily emphasized at the Pequot Museum.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #102 on: October 26, 2015, 09:17:25 AM »
Day 53      October 23,  2015     Uncasville

The Wadsworth Athenean was the castle-like home of a prominent Hartford family.  George Washington slept here.  The statue of Nathan Hale greeted us.  He is famous for volunteering to go to New York to spy on the British.  He was very accomplished at age 21 and a Yale graduate.  He was caught and given a sentence of death by hanging.  His response was to say, "I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country."  He is Connecticut's most famous citizen. (Picture 1/6171).

"Tents at Lake O'Hara" by John Singer Sargent was one of our favorite paintings (Picture 2/6167).

"The Charter Oak" (Picture 3/6169) is a portrait of the cherished Charter Oak tree.  The wood frame is carved from the famous oak.  According to legend, the Connecticut charter guaranteeing the colony's right to self-government was hidden in the oak's hollow by Daniel Wadsworth's ancestor Joseph Wadsworth in 1698.  The King of England revoked all the colonies' charters, but Connecticut refused to return theirs.  The British governor of New England brought a lot of soldiers from Massachusetts to seize it.   The blue onion dome of the Colt firearms factory, another powerful Hartford symbol--is visible in the distance, to the right of the oak.

One section displayed beautiful colonial furniture.  Dean and I thought this was a fountain or basin when we first saw this, but then we saw the soft cloth insides.  It is the Colt Family Cradle. (Picture 4/6163) Samuel Colt (famous for his guns) commissioned a cradle to honor his newborn son.  A German woodcarver and piano maker carved this from the famous Charter Oak Tree.  All of the Colt pistols were carved in great detail.  Carved in the bark is a verse which reminds young Samuel to follow the example of the tree and defend his country whenever it is in danger and that he should die for his country, rather than let anybody hurt it.

Staying at Mohecan Sun Casino
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #103 on: October 30, 2015, 06:14:29 PM »
Day 57      October 27,  2015   Clarksboro, NJ

New Jersey's capitol (Pic 1/6228) has the most stringent security of the 44+ capitols we have visited.  They lost 691 people on 9/11, and they want to protect their capital as much as possible.  You must go on a tour--you are not allowed to walk in the halls unaccompanied.  The tours are on the hour, and you cannot enter the capitol until 5 minutes before the tour.  They screen you and you go into a small holding area.

The "est" of this capitol is the it was the first to have electricity because Thomas Edison's lab and home were in New Jersey.  It was also the QUICKest tour- (20 minutes)-She spoke and walked at the speed of Japan's Bullet Train. I made good use of my 2 years of shorthand classes.   She probably says this script 5 times a day, and she's been doing it for years.  She is a paid state employee.

In 1790, the legislature decided to build the capitol in Trenton because it was located on the Delaware River, a convenient method of travel, and was equi-distant from the south or north.  New Jersey's State House was originally built in 1792, and has been extensively added to, remodeled, replaced, and re-constructed by 17 architects with 17 architectural styles.   Part of the original structure still exists, making it the second oldest in continuous use.  Maryland's capitol is the oldest.
 
The first area was a rotunda with portraits of the first 10 governors and stained glass windows.  The governorship was intended to be a very weak position, appointed by the legislature, which was elected.  They didn't want the governors to be king-like, so they gave them only 1-year terms.  As we walked around, we saw one governor who served for two years, was out for one year, and then back in for eleven years.  The longest term was one governor with 14 one-year terms.  In 1844, the legislator gave them greater power and 3-year terms.  Governors now have 4-year terms. Governors may serve two terms.  Then they have to leave office for one term, and they are then eligible to run for governor again. 

A dome is above the rotunda/lobby, which was right off State Street and was seen as a gathering place for the people.  In 1889, they gilded the dome.  When they last remodeled in 1999, they re-gilded it.  (Picture 2/6208)

One of the stained glass windows is the State Seal.  (Picture 3/6211)  New Jersey's first legislature hired a French immigrant to create the state's original seal in 1776.   On the Great Seal of New Jersey the horse represents speed and strength, and is New Jersey's state animal.  Liberty (left) symbolizes the fight for independence.   The three plows on the center shield and Ceres, the Roman goddess of grain, represent the importance of the farming industry.  (We have been amazed at how much land is planted--mainly corn, cabbage, and lettuce.)  In the State Museum we saw huge glass bells that are placed over the plants to protect them from frost.  The Great Seal is used to authenticate official documents.

We got to tour the governor's foyer.  No pictures were allowed inside, so we got the door (Pic 4/6213) He must have at least 10 secretary-type people, which is by far the most of any state in recent memory. 
We didn't get to see the inside of his office.  Woodrow Wilson is the only New Jersey governor to become president. 
 
"Liberty and Prosperity" is the state motto and recurs throughout the capitol.   Each  county has its own flag on display at the Capitol.  The four state symbols the state tree, the red oak, the state flower, the purple violet, the state insect, the honeybee, and the state bird, the goldfinch are always together and are showcased in many places in the Capitol.  (Pic 5/6215)  The surrounding marble had a moderate orange hue, which really intensified in our pictures.

New Jersey has a bicameral legislature.  Only Nebraska has a unicameral legislature.  The General Assembly and Senate meet from September to June on Mondays and/or Thursdays.  A bill may originate in either house, but appropriations bills must begin in the Senate and end in the Assembly.  Members of both houses may abstain.  Both houses have gone pretty much paperless.

The state is divided into 80 districts.  There are 48 Democrats and 32 Republicans in the Assembly. (Pic 6/6217)  All of the desks in both houses are 1891 original desks, and really quite nice.  Members of each house make $49,500 per year. 

As we entered the Senate, Greek goddesses "Liberty and Prosperity" were over the door.  (Pic 7/6219)  The Senate is modeled after the Roman Senate or House of Lords.  Murals surround the perimeter.
(Pictures 8, 9, 10/6221, 6223, 6225).

We got to the Capitol at a few minutes after the hour, and we were not about to wait outside in the cold, so we went 1 block away to  the warmth of The New Jersey State Museum (free).  They displayed art either by New Jersey residents or of New Jersey scenes.  They showed Native American artifacts, 19th century household items, and natural history. 

The most interesting sections to me were "Nano-the Science of Tiny," which explained how tiny particles will bring cures and make our lives better and the flag of The USS New Jersey (The Black Dragon).  She (?  I think I heard somewhere that ships were shes) was the most-decorated battleship in the Navy and saw service in three wars.  She was launched on the first anniversary of Pearl Harbor.  She had nine  huge 16" guns that could shoot for 24 miles.  I wonder how far today's ships can shoot.

Staying at Timberlane Campground--$82.80/2 nights, FHU.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #104 on: October 30, 2015, 07:03:20 PM »
More pictures....
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #105 on: November 01, 2015, 09:46:15 AM »

Day 59      October 29, 2015   Harrisburg, PA

Throughout the United States, capital buildings are being restored to their original state.  Pennsylvania's capital is no different.  The fountain has been undergoing reconstruction since the spring.  It is already 3 times the anticipated cost.  The parts they needed for repair were so old that they are no longer made.  So they have had to make them individually by hand. 

The Capitol in Harrisburg is spectacular!  When President Theodore Roosevelt attended the dedication in 1906, he said, "This is the handsomest building I ever saw."  It was designed in the American Renaissance style.  The architect envisioned it as a Palace of Art, and it is by far the most artistic and decorated capital in the U. S.  It cost $13 million, which may be the most expensive capital.  The paintings, stained glass, and furnishings were done by some of the best artisans in the world at that time.  All of the ornate doorknobs have the state seal engraved on them, and it is on all the elevators.  Various areas are themed--Italian in the House Chamber, French in the Senate Chamber, and English in the Governor's Reception Room.  But, it all blends together beautifully.  At the top of the dome is "Commonwealth," a gilded-bronze statue of a female figure representing Pennsylvania.  She holds a mace of statehood in her left and extends her right hand.

It is so enormous that it is impossible to photograph.  (Picture 1/6231).  We entered through a very modern, sleek annex that is attached on several sides of the original capital.  The annex houses the offices for the senators and representatives.

This is also the newest capitol we've visited recently, maybe ever.  In  1682 when William Penn founded Pennsylvania, the Provincial Assembly had no official meeting place, moving between Philadelphia's Town Hall, meeting houses, schools, taverns, inns, and private homes.  Starting in 1735, they met in Independence Hall.  When the British troops occupied Philadelphia, the Assembly moved to Lancaster.  In 1790, they ratified the Pennsylvania Constitution and created the House of Representatives and Senate.  They debated what the location of their capital should be for 20 years, and they chose Harrisburg.  The first capital was build from 1819-1822.  In 1897, the capital burned down while they were in session, probably due to a faulty fireplace flue.  We've heard this about so many of the capitals.  In 1898, a new building was constructed for $550,000.  It was considered so undignified and unattractive that it was never completed.  However, the General Assembly met in the unfinished building.  In 1904, they started building a new capital.  In 1987, the new West Wing was opened.

The Rotunda entry is jaw-dropping amazing.  The glass and brass elevators sparkle; the Grand Staircase was truly grand.  The dome overhead weighs 26 tons and is 272 feet above the floor--four stories high plus open air.  It is lit by 4,000 lights.(Pic 2/6232)  The rotunda is so magnificent and rich with symbols that it is used for announcements, bill-signings and press conferences. There are eight large murals about Pennsylvania's history (Pic 3/6234) and reclining goddesses (Pic 4/6239).  Even the floor tiles are symbolic.  The floor is colorful Moravian tiles and interspersed with 400 tile mosaics illustrating the state's history, animals, industries, occupations, and modes of transportation.  There are 200 clocks in the Capitol that have to be hand-wound once a week.

Beautiful marble sculptures of 27 figures flank both sides of the 17-foot tall ornate bronze doors at the main entrance.  Each door weighs a ton, but can swing open at the push of one hand.

Pennsylvania is one of only 5 full-time capitols.  They meet on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays from September to June.  They spend Thursdays and Fridays at their district office.

 Unfortunately, when they let visitors on the floor of the legislature, vandalism occurred, so they won't let anyone on the floor of either house unless they are accompanied by a member of that house.  We could only see the House from the gallery one floor above.  We haven't encountered this before, and all Dean's pictures came out dark because he only had his normal flash, not his external flash.  It is a real shame because it was glorious.

In the House, (Pic 5/6250) there is a 35-foot square painting behind the Speaker's chair that grabs your attention as you enter.  It depicts distinguished state residents at the feet of a figure representing the "Genius of State."  Penn is in the center in a red robe, and Benjamin Franklin is at his right hand.  The lights hanging from the ceiling are huge. (Pic 6/6243)   The ceiling is recessed in sections and very ornate. (Pic 7/6245)   The House Chamber also has magnificent murals and original mahogany desks. The 10 stained glass windows are themed, like "Religion" (Pictures 8 & 9/6246 & 6247)  The stained-glass windows are framed in 24-karat gold leaf. 

There are 203 members of the House (119 R and 94 D) and they serve two-year terms.  They elect the Speaker of the House.  Democrats sit on the left, and Republicans on the right.  They have a huge ornate mace, which is a symbol of authority, peace, and order, dating back to Roman times.  It is 46 inches long, topped with a brass sphere that is engraved on both sides with the Coat of Arms, and an eagle at the very top.  We last saw a mace in Victoria, BC, Canada, and I don't think we've seen one in any other state.   Six crystal chandeliers light the House.  They weigh between two tons and four tons and require over 1,000 light bulbs. 

The Senate started with only 18 Senators, but now there are 50 (30 R and 20 D).  They serve four-year terms.  They use a voice vote system.  When they vote, their whole name lights up red if they vote "no" and green if they vote "yes."  In other states, they just have a little red or green light by their names.
Democrats sit on the left, Republicans on the right. 

They have lovely mahogany large desks that were used in 1906. Rare green Irish marble is on the walls.  On the floor, there are 4 massive gold brass lights weighing 5,000 pounds each at the front.  Everything that is gold-colored in the whole capital is 23 Karat gold-leaf.  They started re-gilding the Capitol in 1985; it took 21 years to do it because there is so much gold throughout the Capitol.  Gold symbols surround the Senate chamber.  There are beautiful murals of events in Pennsylvania history and huge gold statues.  There are 14 stained glass windows, each with 4 layers of glass and a theme.  The lights had symbolic statues inside them. (Pic 10/6251)

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court is unique in many ways.  It is the oldest supreme court in the U. S.  Only 12 supreme courts in the U. S. are still housed in the Capitol buildings. It is the only travelling supreme court and roves between Harrisburg, Philadelphia, and Pittsburgh.  It is very large and beautiful.  It has 16 intricate paintings.  One of the paintings intrigued me.  It's a "keynote" painting.  If you look at it carefully, you can see the words "love," "law," and "wisdom," are almost hidden in "Divine Law. (Pic 11/6253)  A keystone is the center stone in an arch which holds the arch together.  Pennsylvania says it is the Keystone State because they were what held the colonies together. There is a beautiful green stained glass dome above (Picture 12/6254).

Our tour guide had hurried us through the tour, so we returned to the Senate to admire the stained glass windows and murals.  Pic 13/6261 was about the Militia.   Pic 14/6265 honored the role of the railroads.  Pic 15/6267 is a great mural and encircling it was the saying, "Let us raise a standard to which the wise and honest can repair the events in the hands of God.  Picture 16/6269 shows a bright light lit with a 25-watt bulb, the only kind available in 1906.  They cut diamonds in the glass to diffuse the light and make it brighter.

As we left, we saw the most photogenic State Seal on the back wall of the elevator.  Unlike most state seals, it has an obverse and reverse.  The observe has a central image of a shield with a ship under full sail, a plow and three sheaves of wheat.  They represent the importance of commerce, labor, perseverance, and agriculture to the state's economy.  On either side of the shield are a stalk of Indian corn and an olive branch, recognizing the past and hopes for the future.  On top of the shield an eagle proudly symbolizes the state's sovereignty.  The reverse side pictures Lady Liberty dominating Tyranny in the form of a lion, with the words, "Both Can't Survive."

We have seen about 45 capitals.  I think this is the most magnificent, though Dean thinks Frankfort is.  I'd visit this capital again if we're in the area.  The murals are just spectacular, and I'd like to linger and enjoy.  Beauty is everywhere--even their glass elevators.  It is super handicapped-accessible.

Stayed at Walmart Harrisburg
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #106 on: November 01, 2015, 09:50:20 AM »
More pictures
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #107 on: November 01, 2015, 09:56:52 AM »
More pictures
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

ArdraF

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #108 on: November 01, 2015, 06:35:26 PM »
I've visited a lot of state capitols but I don't think I've ever been in the one in my state of birth.  Your narrative and photos make me think maybe we should go there the next time we're in the vicinity.  I'm not sure I've ever been to Harrisburg either!  But then I haven't lived in Pa. since high school.

ArdraF
ArdraF
:D :D

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #109 on: November 02, 2015, 10:53:31 PM »
I've visited a lot of state capitols but I don't think I've ever been in the one in my state of birth.  Your narrative and photos make me think maybe we should go there the next time we're in the vicinity.  I'm not sure I've ever been to Harrisburg either!  But then I haven't lived in Pa. since high school.

ArdraF

Where were you born?  I really think Harrisburg rates up there with Mt. Rushmore as a work of art.  And, they did it without it appearing gaudy anywhere.  So tastefully done!  Just exquisite! 

We were going to do Santa Fe on this trip, too, but considering its 7200 feet of elevation, we are thinking we might want to save it and do it when we go to Texas next spring.  I'm a little afraid of running into snow and super cold weather.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #110 on: November 13, 2015, 04:54:30 PM »
I hope to do more postings, but we are heading home (California) in travel mode (400+ miles/day).  We want to be in Phoenix to visit my best friend, who is undergoing IV antibiotic treatment for Lyme disease.  Her good days are Monday & Tuesday, and then she goes downhill from there.  It's kind of like chemo.

But, I wanted to share with RVForumers some information you might find helpful.

1) The FMCA RV park in Cincinnati is great for visiting Cincinnati.  It has concrete, smooth roads and pads with grass separating sites, which are spacious.  Everything is pristine, with wonderful full hook-ups, but no recreation, pool, etc.  And, it is free!

2) Topeka is a classy city!  The Deer Creek Valley RV Park also has great concrete, smooth roads and pads with grass separating sites, which are well-spaced.  They are wonderfully organized, and the hosts are great.  $40/night

3) Right next to the above RV park is the world's best BBQ--Lonnie Q's BBQ.  It's only open from 11-1, Monday through Friday, and from 5:30-7:30 Friday night.  Closed weekends.  Dean and I have our own smoker and seek out BBQ restaurants, and we've never had better BBQ.  We delayed our sightseeing on 3 days to be able to have brunch at Lonnie's.  There are only 7 items on the menu, but they are all outstanding.  Dean and I split one meal and leave full.

4) If you are visiting St. Louis, MO, the St. Louis RV Park is in the inner city, bounded by MLK Blvd. and a huge police station.  We felt secure.  The park is old, but had good hook-ups.  Spaces are close together, but they give you two spaces, one for your coach and one for your toad.  We would stay there again,  The hosts are conscientious and trying to please.  There were no other reasonable choices.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

ArdraF

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #111 on: November 13, 2015, 05:08:05 PM »
Quote
Where were you born?

The York Pa. Hospital.  I was supposed to have been born at Walter Reed but, the Army being what it is, plans changed and we happened to be in York when the event took place!  About 20 years ago Mother showed Jerry and me the exact room from across the street.  We were amazed she even knew where the room was.

Lyme disease can be pretty devastating.  I wish your friend the best and it's good you can visit her en route.  Have a safe trip home.

ArdraF
ArdraF
:D :D

 

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