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Author Topic: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England  (Read 13790 times)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #30 on: September 22, 2015, 11:36:13 AM »
We are in Montpelier, headed tomorrow to Lubec Maine to see Campobello.

After that, we go to Bar Harbor to see Acadia NP, Wendell Gilley Museum, and possibly do a Guildive Cruise.

Then to Rockland/Rockport to see the Farnsworth Art Museum, Hardy Boat Cruise for fall foliage & history, and on to Augusta.

Anyone with something to add to our itinerary, please feel free.  How long we stay up here is dependent somewhat on what color the leaves are.  Timing leaves is a lot like timing investments--almost impossible--but our dream is to migrate south with the leaf color.  Pipe dream???

Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Ken & Sheila

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #31 on: September 22, 2015, 03:46:10 PM »
Linda
The Ben & Jerry's factory is in Waterbury and the Von Trapp Family lodge is in Stowe.  Said it reminded them of home when they buit there.
Ken & Sheila
2009 Monaco Camelot 42 PDQ
2008 Jeep Liberty, 2006 Saturn Vue
Fur-ball kids: Ariel and Mia

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #32 on: September 22, 2015, 04:16:10 PM »
Linda
The Ben & Jerry's factory is in Waterbury and the Von Trapp Family lodge is in Stowe.  Said it reminded them of home when they buit there.

Thanks,  the Ben & Jerry's is a ton of fun, but it's a one-timer. 

We've seen "The Sound of Music" so many times that seeing their lodge might be fun.  We are awaiting our FedEx package, so we'll either do the hotel or a scenic drive.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

HappyWanderer

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #33 on: September 22, 2015, 06:41:05 PM »
How long we stay up here is dependent somewhat on what color the leaves are.  Timing leaves is a lot like timing investments--almost impossible--but our dream is to migrate south with the leaf color.  Pipe dream???

With the warm days and cool nights that we've been having, there should be a dramatic change in color in another week or so.

Dean & Linda Stock

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  • Posts: 1195
Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #34 on: September 23, 2015, 08:47:52 AM »
 
Day 19      September 19, 2015      White River Junction, VT

We enjoy raptor centers, and there is one just a couple of miles from our camp, the best we've ever visited.  VINS (Vermont Institute of  Natural Science) charges $12.50 for seniors and receives no federal or state funds, so admissions and donations fund their $1.3 million budget.

Their staff is amazingly knowledgeable and so friendly and willing to share.  As we were strolling to the Vet Care Center, we met the Manager, who gave us lots of interesting information.  We shared how impressed we were with his staff, and he said that was the biggest budget item.  He just lost his #2 man, who was earning $70.000 a year.  He moved to Los Alamos to take a government position at over triple the money, $210,000+!!  He made us aware of the newest display showing the relationship through time of the dinosaurs and birds.  Everything here was of excellent quality.  Even the trees were labeled as to type.

The Raptor Talk was given by 2 summer-only lecturers who sounded like they had  Ph.D.'s in ornithology, with a specialty in raptors.  Raptors' name comes from the Latin repere, which is means "to grasp."  All raptors have forward -facing eyes, which gives them good depth perception, unlike ducks who can't judge and start paddling many feet above where they land and until they hit the water.  They all grasp their prey with talons and have a sharp knife-like beak.  Only 1 in 5 hunting attempts is successful.  Raptors are a sentinel species and were very important in determining the problems with DDT.

All raptors except the Harris Hawk are solitary.  They will mate for life, but they only get together to raise a new family, and then it's, "See you here next year."  The golden eagle lost her partner last year, (due to old age) and she spent 2 months uttering constant mournful cries.  The nature center finally decided to move the golden eagle that they used in shows into her cage, and the widow immediately stopped her cries. (He didn't like being a show bird anyway.)

The rough-legged hawk (Pic.1/5738) has feathers that cover his legs.  These are important because he lives in the Arctic and flies south to VERMONT!! to winter.

Buteos are a class of birds with broad wings and tails who ride air currents and some members can hover.  The rough-legged hawk and the American Kestrel (Pic 2/5685) are buteos.  The kestrel is a falcon, not a hawk, and is often misnamed "sparrow hawk" because he eats sparrows.  In the wild, mice urinate as they walk, giving them a trail to follow back home.  However, the trail luminesces for the kestrel, and it leads him right to his prey.  The mouse may duck into a hole.  However, the kestrel hovers, and is able to lock his head in place while moving the rest of his body, ensuring that he never loses sight of where his prey is.  He tries to kill his prey by punching it at high speed with a hit to the head, which usually works.  If not he gets it with his grasp by the talons, and a notch in his beak allows him to snap the prey's neck.  In his dive, he exceeds 200 miles per hour!

The barred owl (Picture 3/5741) has striped feathers (bars) and eyes that are shaped like a pear to let in lots of light.  The smallest part of the pear (end) is what we see, so imagine what's inside his head!  He has lots of light-sensing rods, and he can see well during the day.  His 2 giant facial disk sound funnels on his face are like two gigantic ears, and he can move his feathers to reshape the funnel to listen in specific directions.  His wings are shaped for silent flight.  That way he won't alert his prey or disrupt his hearing of the prey's movements.  His call sounds a lot like a barking dog.  He loves fishing in swamps.

The Harris Hawk (Picture 4/5730) is also called The Winged Wolf.  They are found in the southwestern US.  They form a group and hunt jackrabbits.  They weigh about 1.5 pounds, and jackrabbits weigh 9-10 pounds, and jackrabbits don't want to be eaten, so they have to work together.  One hawk lands on a cactus, then another lands on him, until there are 5-8 birds stacked one on top of another.  Two of the hawks chase the prey, while the others in the hawk tower keep their eyes riveted on the prey.  When those two hawks get tired, the next two take over.  Eventually the jackrabbit tires and goes to a bush.  The group surrounds the bush and keep probing and jabbing at it until the rabbit is exhausted, and they have their meal.  He flew fast and low over the audience (Picture 5/5724)

The Cooper's Hawk was my favorite.  He is the most beautiful Cooper's I've ever seen.  He uses his long tail to fly through wooded areas and make sharp turns.  If only our pictures of him had come out well enough to print!

Dean and I visited the enclosures of about 20 raptors; this is by far the largest raptor center we've visited.  At 1:00, we took the raptor enclosure guided tour.  It sounded boring, but it was very interesting.  The guide told us what problems they encountered with each bird and how they adapted each enclosure to the bird's handicap and likes and dislikes.  The bald eagle (Pic 6/5671) is very friendly and likes to sit up front and look over his visitors.  The snowy owl was so so white!  (Picture 7/5760)

At 1:30, the talk on raptor sounds provided a chance to see more birds up close.  The great horned owl is the largest, most aggressive owl.  (Picture 8/5768) He can turn his head 270° as he swivels his neck.  He hoots to attract a mate and establish territories.  But, this owl won't quit!  He hoots constantly.  He would starve in the wild because he would give away his position to prey.  He was hit by a car and has had 2 seizures.  He is blind in one eye, and is extremely calm, which is very unusual (brain damage?).  The rehabilitators are often able to return a raptor with one eye to the wild, but not one as noisy as he is!  Doesn't he have an expressive face?

The barn owl (Picture 9/5784) sounds like a screecher with a very shrill cry, whereas the screech owl actually has a melodious call.  All barn owls have one eye higher than the other to allow better vision.  This one was purposely imprinted on humans (he thinks he is human) because they wanted a bird for educational purposes.  He would not hunt prey in the wild; he would look for a human to feed him.  In choosing a mate, he would choose a human girlfriend.

Dean dropped me at home and went on to the American Precision Museum.  He said it would be of interest only to machinists.

Staying at Limehurst Lake Campground -- FHU $120.21/3 days, nice host, on a lake, pretty scenery, no extras
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #35 on: September 23, 2015, 08:54:02 AM »
More pics
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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  • Posts: 1195
Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #36 on: September 23, 2015, 09:36:02 AM »
Day 20      September 20, 2015      White River Junction, VT

Today we planned to go to the Calvin Coolidge National Historic Site and a science museum, but the CCNHS was so good, we spent the whole day there.  Vermont was the birthplace of Coolidge and President Chester Arthur.  We paid  $14 for 2 admissions with AAA discount.  They have preserved the whole village as it was in the early 1900's, and almost everything is original.  There is the home where he was born, the church, cheese factory, one-room schoolhouse, the barn, and general store, and many have original furnishings.  The President is buried in the town cemetery. 

We saw a very short film on Coolidge's life and several pictures with explanations or simplistic audio.  He attended a one-room schoolhouse with 23 students aged 5 (Calvin) through 18.  Students moved at their own pace.  At age 12, his sister passed everything and qualified to be a teacher.  Calvin was only an average student, but he passed the exam to be a teacher at age 13.  He moved to a nearby town to attend high school.  He was a true farm boy, and he tended animals, baled hay, picked and sold apples, and kept accounts for his well-respected shopkeeper & businessman father who served 10 years as a state senator and assembly member.  Cal graduated from Amherst (Massachusetts) with honors and law school.

But, he wasn't always a good boy.  The boys of Union (next town) and Plymouth Notch (Cal's town) vied for the honor of firing the cannon on the Fourth of July.  Cal and his friends settled the issue for once and for all in 1892.  They formed a raiding party and crept down in the early morning hours of the 4th and quietly took the 500-pound cannon from its place at the Union.  They dragged it up the steep slope to the Notch and hid it behind the pile of manure in the basement of the Wilder (grandpa) barn.  When the doors were opened, the floor boards lifted up, rolling out the cannon without using any of the perpetrators.  A long lanyard was pulled, and the cannon boomed.  It was heard throughout the sleeping village.  Before they could gather their wits, the cannon was quickly drawn back inside the barn with a long rope, and the barn doors were closed.  Swiftly it was swabbed out, reloaded and rolled out again and fired.  Meanwhile, the Union City boys had heard the distant thunder and discovered their prize cannon missing, and they came running up the road.  John Wilder (grandpa) met them and told them that he'd fight them all.  So they backed down  That afternoon the young Amherst student Cal gave a stirring speech on the glories of independence and looked like he was a model citizen.

He had an interest in politics and was defeated when he ran for school board, but two years later was elected to the Massachusetts state legislature.  He won a statewide race for the Massachusetts Senate in 1912, and then he became governor.  He did all his politics in Massachusetts, but he always considered himself a Vermonter.  He won national attention when he called out the National Guard when the Boston police went on strike.  He told Samuel Gompers, the AFL leader, that no one had the right to strike against public safety, anytime, anywhere.  He supported a cost-of-living pay increase for public employees, limited the workweek for women and children to 48 hours, and limited outdoor advertising.  He believed that women should have the right to vote.

He went to the RNC in Chicago in 1920 as his state's favorite son, but he only got 34 votes.  Backroom dealing was supposed to nominate Irving Lenroot of Wisconsin to be Harding's VP.  But, rebellious delegates swept Cal onto the ticket.

When Cal was vacationing at his home, President Harding died from a heart attack.  His father administered the Oath of Office to Cal because he was eligible to do so in his position of notary public in this room (Picture 1/5805).  At the time, he thought that taking the oath was just something he had to do.  Later, he came to appreciate the ceremonial aspect.  He fulfilled the remaining year of Harding's presidency and was re-elected.   His re-election was assured, but he chose not to run because he didn't think it was best for the country.  He made extensive use of the radio and reached more Americans than all previous presidents combined.  He really was a simple, common sense man.

We've seen lots of old homesteads, but we saw many new items to us, especially in the barn.  Picture 2/5790 is a winter hearse with sled runners to get through the snow.  Picture 3/5793 is a rural free delivery sleigh used in the winters of the 1920s and 1930s.  It has a small stove in it.  The shafts are off-center so that the horse could walk in the runner track made by previous sleighs.  Early carrier had to buy their own vehicles, and they had to provide and care for their own horses. 

Picture 4/5796 is Cal's maternal grandparents' house, and it is now a wonderful restaurant.  Dean and I had lunch there.  Vermont values--$1.25 for my cup of soup and the same for Dean's cup of chili.

Picture 5/5798 is a nanny rocker located in the bedroom where Cal was born.  You put the baby next to you with the front bars up and could then rock him,  while having your hands free to be able to knit.  If guests came over and you needed extra seating, the bars are removable, and it's a 2-seat rocker.

The birds' eye maple and oak counter used in the general store today was made by Cal and his father in his youth. (Picture 6/5799)

Pictures 7 & 8/5800 & 5801 are of the gorgeous community church that Cal attended as a youth and every time he vacationed in Vermont during his presidency.  I loved the curving wooden roof. 

We went to the cheese factory that was founded in 1890 by the Coolidge family.  Plymouth is the second oldest operating cheese maker in the U.S.  They make their cheese by hand and waxed it, the way they did it over 125 years ago.  I could taste the difference.  It was so good that we bought some, although it was expensive.

The signage gave little information about the accomplishments of Cal's presidency.  There were few that I could find, even looking at the Internet.  He signed into law a bill giving Native Americans US citizenship and allowing them to retain their sovereignity.  He visited the Sioux and  when he signed the bill they made him an honorary chief, "Chief Leading Eagle," at the Summer White House in South Dakota.  He visited Cuba.  He signed a pact with 62 nations in 1929 renouncing war.  He fostered good relations with businesses and was fortunate to serve in a time of economic prosperity.

It was a beautiful Vermont day, and there was a feeling here of a simpler life, but a comfortable life.  The President's son and daughter-in-law gave the house and all the furnishings to the State of Vermont, complete with the furnishings exactly as they were in 1923.  The State of Vermont bought the cheese factory from John in 1960.  They have re-established production of the distinctive granular curd-type Plymouth Cheese., which was so good that we bought some. 

Staying at Limehurst Lake Campground -- FHU $120.21/3 days, nice host, on a lake, pretty scenery, no extras
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #37 on: September 23, 2015, 09:56:11 AM »
Day 21      September 21, 2015      Williamstown (Outside Montpelier), VT

Vermont was a land of dispute between New Hampshire and New York, both of whom gave settlers grants of the same land.  England and France also fought over it.  Vermont tried to be the 14th original colony, but they were rejected.  There was a strong movement to join Canada since the U. S. didn't want them.  In 1777, they became a republic.

They built their first state house in 1808 and stayed there until they outgrew it in 1836,  The second state house lasted from 1838-1857, when they had a fire and burned it down.  It was really cold and the legislature was in session.  Workmen stoked the wood stoves to provide heat and then took a coffee break.  All that was saved was the portico in front that was used in this third capitol and a portrait of George Washington.

When they built the third capitol, (Pic 1/5806), they were almost paranoid about fire prevention.  The columns inside and the stairs look like they are wood, but they are actually cast iron (which wouldn't burn). They even put huge iron shutters over the windows to be able to cut off oxygen in case of fire. 

There were no trees at the Capitol, as there are today, because all of Vermont's trees had been cut down to provide wood to build ships in Massachusetts.  They used lots of open land to feed sheep, which were later replaced by dairy cows.  Later, there were efforts to reverse the deforestation.

From over a mile away, we could see the copper dome that was gilded with 23.7 K gold in the 1900's  shining.  At its top stands the statue of Agriculture.  The original statue rotted and was in danger of toppling off the dome.  With help from Capitol janitors, the 87-year-old Sergeant-at-Arms carved a 14-foot replacement mounted on a six-foot pedestal.

As we entered, we noticed the black and white checked floor.  The white is Vermont marble, and the black is  marble with lots of fossils in it (Pic 2/5835).

We were able to go into the Senate, (Pic 3/5812) which meets from January to April or May.  It has been restored to its original state, just as it was when first build except for the vanity curtains in front of the desks, which are original (Pic.4/5813).  When ladies were elected to the Senate, these were added (Pic 5/5816).  The chairs were originally upholstered with horsehair, but today's leather is much more comfortable.  The lieutenant governor runs the Senate.  There are 25 Democrats and 5 Republicans.  There is a Democratic governor and a republican lieutenant governor.  The Senators have no staff and no offices.  There are legislative lawyers assigned to specialties such as agriculture, and they can go consult with them.  The governor, lieutenant governor, President Pro Tem, and the Speaker of the House are the only ones with offices.  Each of the legislators has a license plate with the number of their region so their voters will recognize them when they're driving down the street, especially when they are home.  No technology is allowed in the Senate.  It's interesting that in New York there will be no paper in their legislature by January, 2016, and in Vermont they are all paper.  There is one senator per county, regardless of population or size.

We looked for the rotunda and inner dome, but there is none.  When they were building the Capitol, it was in the plans, but the Director of the Budget axed it.

Until the 1960's, there was one representative for each town or city, regardless of population, and there were 251 representatives.  They decided it would be better to elect by districts of equal population, and it has been done that way ever since.  Lines are redrawn when the census is done every 10 years.  There are now 150 representatives.  Our guide has lived in the same house since 1975, and she's been in 3 different districts. 

In the house, desks are original.  The senators can't come in without an invitation, usually for the governor's State of the State speech.  They sit up front in the chairs usually used by the general public (Pic 6/5817).  The painting of George Washington  rescued from the fire is hung here.  The State Seal is prominent (Pic 7/5823).  It shows the importance of agriculture in the state.  Lights are original, but have been converted from gas to electricity.  If you want to talk with you representative, it's easy.  They all give out their home addresses, personal phone numbers, personal email, and government email.  They work Tuesday through Friday.  The MOST compensation they can receive with maximum per diem is $5,500!!!  This is a very thrifty state!  They have no governor's mansion, either.  They have a problem raising money.  Many of their residents go to New Hampshire to buy goods because they have 0% sales tax, whereas Vermont has a 9% sales tax.  In the last session, they voted to recapture the lost revenue from car sales by charging the sales tax when you register a new car, even if it wasn't purchased in Vermont.  There are no term limits for any position.

The governor serves coffee and donuts every Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday in his Ceremonial Office (Pic 8/5826).  This gives the people a chance to chat with him.  The Constitution Chair behind the desk is made from timber of the ship the USS Constitution (Old Ironsides).  A Vermonter asked what they were going to do with the wood and was told that they were going to throw it away.  He took the wood and made a chair for every state in the Union at the time with that state's seal.

They took us into the Cedar Creek Room to show us a painting of the Vermont soldiers done by a 15-year-old who became one of the state's most famous painters.  But, I was more interested in the original glass skylights in the room (Pic 9/5826).  They had been covered over many times and were discovered by workers when there was a leak.  The glass had been shattered.  The restorers took all those glass shards and recreated the original stained glass skylights, adding new pieces of glass to fill in the missing pieces.

Of course, Bernie Sanders is a big name in Vermont.   He was the mayor of Burlington and then served Vermont in the U. S. Senate, but he never served in either of the statehouses.

Staying at Limehurst Lake Campground -- FHU $120.21/3 days, nice host, on a lake, pretty scenery, no extras
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #38 on: September 23, 2015, 09:59:00 AM »
More pictures
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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  • Posts: 1195
Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #39 on: September 23, 2015, 10:10:57 AM »
Day 22      September 22, 2015      Williamstown, VT

We had Internet this morning so we stayed at the RV and took care of business.  This just left us the afternoon.  Yesterday at the Capitol, we were told that we should visit the Vermont Historical Society.  Admission was $3.  It was like a museum, but instead of having many relics, it had just a few.  There was one impressive relic, this  great-grandfather clock (too big to just be a grandfather) which was once in an elegant Montpelier hotel.  (Pic 1)

Primarily, this historical building was a timeline of illustrated signboards about the history of Vermont, which was really interesting.  Their state motto is "Freedom and Unity," which prevailed through the whole timeline.  They believe strongly in giving the most possible freedom for each individual while being unified in providing for safety and the shared values of the community.

Vermont joined the US in 1791 as a non-slave state, but allowing that slave-holding states could do as they want.  The first half of the Vermont Constitution outlawed slavery. There were many abolitionist groups who wanted  total freedom for slaves, but most believed in "gradually abolishing slavery in the US."      How is that achieved, specifically?  I don't get it, and I wish they'd described the plan.  I think it's kind of like being a little bit pregnant.  Many of the abolitionists felt that the slaves should be returned to Africa.

When Lincoln asked Vermont what he could expect from Vermont if the South seceded, its governor said, "Vermont will do its duty."  They were a big part of the Underground Railroad until the Federal government cracked down and threatened them.  At the Capitol, we were told that Vermont sent more men into battle in the Civil War than any other state.  However, other states make the same claim.

Vermont was the first state to give women the right to vote in state elections.  However, when the 19th amendment was proposed, their governor refused to sign it, and it became law without Vermont's vote.  In 1999, the legislature voted to allow same sex couples to form a union/partnership.  Over 1500 people came to Montpelier (which is a lot in Vermont!) to express their feelings to the legislature.

I admire people who admit their wrong deeds.  In the early 1920's, the Ku Klux Klan was active in persecuting African Americans, Jews, and Catholics.  The Irish, French Canadians, and Italians immigrated.  Their Catholic religion, languages, and cultural traditions made them considered outsiders. They didn't think they would carry on Vermont's traditional values. Two major cities made laws banning meetings of people wearing masks or disguises.  They had a KKK hood on display.  However,  the citizenry accomplished the defeat of the KKK quickly by boycotting businesses whose owners were KKK members.

Their other black mark was the Vermont Eugenics Survey, which was founded by a professor at the University of Vermont.  He did multi-generational studies of Vermonters in institutions to document genetic defects.  In 1931, Vermont sterilized them so their genes wouldn't be passed on.  The study and sterilizations ended in 1936.

We really like the hard-working host at our RV park and its pretty setting by a forested lake with ducks (who unfortunately quack at 6:00 AM). (Pics 2 & 3)

Staying at Limehurst Lake Campground -- FHU $120.21/3 days, nice host, on a lake, pretty scenery, no extras
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #40 on: September 23, 2015, 10:17:02 AM »
With the warm days and cool nights that we've been having, there should be a dramatic change in color in another week or so.
Thanks for the expert prediction.  We have seen a change in just the 3 days we've been here.  I was so impressed by the maroon leaves in the tree in front of our RV that I asked Dean to take a picture of it.  Unfortunately, it also had 6 different colored suns in it.  Dean says it was a reflection from the lens.  We'll try again today at a different time of day.

We're thinking that in moving to Maine, we should be hitting their peak.  But, what do we Californians know?
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

HappyWanderer

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #41 on: September 23, 2015, 10:21:41 AM »
If you want the full experience, I've got a couple of rakes and a big yard...

ArdraF

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #42 on: September 23, 2015, 02:58:31 PM »
Linda, your descriptions of the raptors was absolutely fascinating.  Mother Nature is so amazing!  Thanks for giving us such a complete write-up.

ArdraF
ArdraF
:D :D

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #43 on: September 24, 2015, 08:47:35 AM »
If you want the full experience, I've got a couple of rakes and a big yard...

If we had the time, I'd love to stop and watch you rake....  Seriously, though, with all that work you get all that beauty, and in my younger days, I would have said, "Give me that rake!" if I could have had that in my yard.  In California, our leaves go from green to brown, and may not finish falling off until spring. 

This country up here is so awe-inspiring.  And I like the people.  But, in the museum the lady said they had two 5-day periods of -20 to -30. And, she said she walked to work every day in that, with 6" of snow on the ground.  I don't think I was ever that hearty.  I can't believe all the mobile homes I see up here.  How do people survive in that weather?
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

  • ---
  • Posts: 1195
Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #44 on: September 24, 2015, 08:49:37 AM »
Linda, your descriptions of the raptors was absolutely fascinating.  Mother Nature is so amazing!  Thanks for giving us such a complete write-up.

ArdraF

Thanks.  I had a fabulous time there and wrote them up on Yelp and Tripadvisor so others will be sure to go.  Such dedicated people!
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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  • Posts: 1195
Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #45 on: September 24, 2015, 09:20:55 AM »
Day 22      September 22, 2015      Williamstown, VT    A wonderful day!

We really appreciate Ken & Sheila's suggestion to visit the Von Trapp site in Stowe.  We had already planned to drive Highway 100 to see the pretty landscape and trees, but Dean had nixed the Von Trapp Lodge.  We so enjoyed our time there--lots of farm animals in real pastures, beautiful flowers and gardens everywhere, and a gorgeous lodge built in 1981.  They sell 2500 sq. ft. chalets within the Austrian-themed lodge featuring 2 master bedrooms, 1 guest bedroom, 3 bathrooms, interior decorating and more.  You can buy 1/12 share and keep the same month each year, but you get a deed title, or you can buy the chalet outright for 12 months.  I would love to know what it costs, but I'm sure it's astronomical. The hilltop is absolutely beautiful and encompasses over 2500 acres of hiking/biking trails.  But, it doesn't have the "tourist" feel.  The views are breath-taking, and the weather was a perfect 72° day.  We were too late for their 11:00 once-daily tour ($18), but it got raves on Tripadvisor and I would have come earlier had I known about it.  It tells the "real" Von Trapp story.  I looked at their paperback book about the family, but I thought $30 was ridiculous, so I'll check other sources.  I enjoyed seeing their pictures hanging on the wall in the basement.

We had a lovely lunch in their lounge, which has a gorgeous view.  Dean had a grass-fed beef hamburger, and I had their bratwurst with sauerkraut and an interesting cherry mustard and Dijon mustard with a bit of horseradish.  The best part for me was the German potato salad.  My great-grandmother immigrated from Germany and made German potato salad.  In turn, she taught my mother.  However, whenever my mother saw it on a menu, she had to try it and compare.  That tradition passed on to me, and I think this was the best I've ever tasted.  I bought a side order to bring home.

On the road home, we stopped at the Old Hollow Cedar Mill and enjoyed the best apple cider with no sugar added.  It tasted like liquid apples.  Dean loved their apple butter and bought some. We also bought 6 cider donuts and brought 2 back for the RV park owner.  I wasn't as impressed with the donuts.

We by-passed the handmade chocolate shop, but the car was magnetized to stop at Ben & Jerry's.  We skipped the interesting factory tour, and got their smallest cup of Cherries Garcia.  Yummmmm...

Beautiful weather, gorgeous scenery, nice people, delicious food......what could be better than that?

One question for you techies--I have a satellite and we get great Internet in the morning.  But, each night when we get back around 5:00, I can get TV but not Internet.  There are few, thin clouds, not enough to interfere.  Any ideas about what's happening?  It's a bit frustrating.

Staying at Limehurst Lake Campground -- FHU $120.21/3 days, nice host, on a lake, pretty scenery, no extras
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #46 on: September 24, 2015, 07:08:39 PM »
Day 24      September 24, 2015       Travel Day     Palmyra, ME

We drove 190 fairly hard miles.  US 2 had a lot of curves and washboard, bumpy areas--enough so that our normal tie-downs on chairs, etc. had to be re-fashioned.  Navigating the narrow lanes in towns was challenging.  Every now and then we'd hit a patch of a few miles that was silky smooth, giving us hope.  We saw a little color.

Staying at Walmart.  Very welcoming manager.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Ken & Sheila

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #47 on: September 24, 2015, 08:02:58 PM »
Linda,

If you come back through the Bangor area there is a nice PA park just a few miles from where you are.
Palmyra Golf Course and Campground on Lang Hill RD. $18


« Last Edit: September 26, 2015, 09:55:03 AM by Ken & Sheila »
Ken & Sheila
2009 Monaco Camelot 42 PDQ
2008 Jeep Liberty, 2006 Saturn Vue
Fur-ball kids: Ariel and Mia

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #48 on: September 26, 2015, 09:12:05 AM »
Day 25      September 25, 2015       Travel Day    Lubec, ME

We drove about 150 bumpy miles.  At an earlier RV park, we met a couple from New England who said they had traded in their Airstream trailer after 70,000 miles because it was falling apart from driving over these roads.  Dean and I were surprised, but now we are believers.

Lubec is the easternmost point in the United States and also the closest point to Africa.

We learned that the nearest cell tower to our park is in Canada, so we signed up for Verizon's Canada program at $5 for each phone for a month,  although we'll only be here a couple of days to see Campobello (FDR's summer home). 

I can't wait to eat lobster rolls, so I was disappointed that Becky's was closed already.  Her father goes out each morning and brings back fish and lobsters, which she cooks and sells from a trailer.  Everyone gave it rave reviews, but it was closed at 4:30 when Dean got there. 

So we went to dinner at the restaurant that our park manager recommended, Cohill's Pub.  Our GPS led us across the bridge to the Canadian border, which provided us with an opportunity to check on crossing it tomorrow.  We did not realize that we had to enter Canada to get to Campobello, and we left our passports at home.  We really didn't want to wait for our daughter to send them to us, and our RV park manager tells us that as of late, Canada has been letting people through if they present their driver's license and they show up on their computers as having a passport.  We learned what the policy was (we already knew because I'd called) and that it depended on the officer on duty.  So, we will cross our fingers and try tomorrow.  Dean really enjoyed his burger, and I thought my haddock was good.   Portions were generous, and we brought food home.  I was happy that I got to try smoked salmon on a stick.  It was very good.  However, the meal was very pricey for what it was.

Staying at Sunset Point RV Park--W & 50 amps, free wifi, right on the water. 

High 64°   Low 37°
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

HappyWanderer

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #49 on: September 26, 2015, 11:52:25 AM »
The problem isn't with crossing into Canada, it's getting back into the US. The nastiest US Customs people we've even encountered were at Campobello.

Ken & Sheila

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #50 on: September 26, 2015, 10:38:44 PM »
Day 25      September 25, 2015       Travel Day    Lubec, ME

We drove about 150 bumpy miles.  At an earlier RV park, we met a couple from New England who said they had traded in their Airstream trailer after 70,000 miles because it was falling apart from driving over these roads.  Dean and I were surprised, but now we are believers.


Linda,

Did you take Hwy 9 (Airline) or Hwy 1 to get to Lubec from Bangor. We drove Hwy 9 year before last on the way to Canada and it was OK. In the past Hwy 1 was always a rough road but I haven't been on it north of Ellsworth in years.

I like to know because we will be going to Eastport next year.

ken
Ken & Sheila
2009 Monaco Camelot 42 PDQ
2008 Jeep Liberty, 2006 Saturn Vue
Fur-ball kids: Ariel and Mia

Hfx_Cdn

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #51 on: September 27, 2015, 06:59:25 AM »
    Happy Wanderer, with the border crossing changes that have come into place over the past year, I'm not so sure an American can still gain entry into Canada with only picture ID.  American Homeland Security has insisted on changes, and I'm not sure all of the changes are totally understood.
    Linda, I'm surprised that seasoned travellers as you and Dean would travel without carrying your Passports, even if you thought that you were not expecting to cross the border.  You never know.  Donna and I carry them with us, even when we go visit our kids who live in Ottawa, just in case we decide at the last minute to take the longer alternate route through the White Mountains.  That aside, there are plenty of fish and lobster restaurants everywhere here in the Maritimes, the weather is gorgeous, and the leaves will soon start showing their colours.

Ed
Ed & Donna
Winter-Pinellas Park FL, Summer- Maritime Canada
2000 Coachmen Catalina 34' DP (owned 2004 to 2015)
2006 Jeep Liberty Toad

Alfa38User

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #52 on: September 27, 2015, 07:50:54 AM »
Not only is entry into Canada  more difficult but an American without passports and trying to re-enter the USA is likely to be given a hard time or even denied entry by Homeland Security people. It was well published several years ago that US citizens now require their passports to re-enter USA. The only exception is perhaps having those enhanced drivers licenses with the required citizenship information on them. (And they only work for land crossings, not air travel FWIW).

Happy Travels!!!
« Last Edit: September 27, 2015, 07:54:00 AM by Alfa38User »
Stu
Montréal, Canada 🍁
Snowbird, Naples Florida
Alfa Gold 38 (2000) 5ver (parked!)

"Of course I talk to myself, sometimes I need expert advise!!!"

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #53 on: September 27, 2015, 09:23:58 AM »

Day 26      September 25, 2015       Lubec, ME

TripAdvisor tripped me up and told me that Campobello (the summer vacation home of FDR, Eleanor, and their kids) opened at noon, when in reality they opened at 10:00.  It's the first time the site has ever been wrong, but now that we are in the off-season, I will call ahead and verify in the future.  This was important because the highlight of the day was Tea with Eleanor.  The Visitors Center gives out tickets for the free tea and cookies with two docents on a first-come, first-served basis.  We got the last one ticket, and I quickly grabbed it because I'm the one who has been reading Eleanor's biography at home and Teddy's biography on the road.  We then saw the short film about the Roosevelts and a guide brought Dean an extra ticket.  Hurrah!

Campobello (Picture 1/5848) is a joint venture between the US and Canadian governments.  It includes FDR's home and grounds that are on a hill above The Bay of Fundy.  The bay has a 30 foot delta between high and low tides.  His home has 34 bedrooms and has lots of bright flowers that seem to thrive in this BRRR cold (Pictures 2/5851 & 3/5852).  We got a glimpse into the life they lived here.  FDR came to the island for the first time with his parents when he was only 18 months old.  As a youth, he spent every summer here racing boats, playing pool, playing board games, (Picture 4/5855), having 3-legged races, and going to dances.  He was in robust health.  In the game room is one of the sailboats he whittled and sailed with his children.

He loved watching the activities of the bay with his telescope. (Picture 5/5856)  They had 2 residents of the island who acted as cook and caretaker, and they brought along 6 servants with them.  The kitchen was a busy place (Picture 6/5857).  FDR added this beautiful water heater.  When many places were converting from gas lamps to electric, FDR asked Eleanor, and she said, "NO!" 

The highlight of the day was Tea with Eleanor.  The two docents talked for an hour and had all of us listening and laughing.   I am reading Eleanor's biography, but I knew very few of their stories.  Eleanor was a huge advocate of all peoples' right.  When she was first lady, the Secret Service uncovered the information that the KKK had put a $5000 bounty on her head.  She had planned to visit the South, and the Secret Service told her absolutely not.  She didn't argue.  She just took shooting lessons and bought a gun, which she carried with her as she toured the South.  She didn't have to use it, which she said was good because she was a very poor marksman.  She was such an amazing woman that I can't believe that we are still debating what woman to put on the ten dollar bill.  These ladies love talking about Eleanor and admire her so much that they transmitted the feeling to all of us. 

Staying at Sunset Point RV Park.

Headed to Bar Harbor, Rockland/Rockport, Augusta, Boothbay, Portland--all in Maine.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #54 on: September 27, 2015, 09:32:00 AM »
Not only is entry into Canada  more difficult but an American without passports and trying to re-enter the USA is likely to be given a hard time or even denied entry by Homeland Security people. It was well published several years ago that US citizens now require their passports to re-enter USA. The only exception is perhaps having those enhanced drivers licenses with the required citizenship information on them. (And they only work for land crossings, not air travel FWIW).

Happy Travels!!!

I think they may be more liberal on the road to Campobello, which is an island.  Maybe they have another checkpoint if you try to enter Canada from any of the ferries or in a boat, so this isn't as hard a checkpoint.  We were very glad it worked because we drove a lot of extra miles to get here.  The agent talked with us for a while, took our drivers' licenses, and pulled up our passports on the computer.  She was very nice.  The first night when we got lost and accidentally crossed the border, the US agent did the same thing and told us we wouldn't have any trouble getting back into the US.  If we had any idea that we would be in Canada, we would have brought our passports with us.  Dean had me remove PASSPORTS from my file entitled, "Things to Bring Each Time," that we check off each time before we leave.  I have already put it back on the list.

Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Hfx_Cdn

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #55 on: September 27, 2015, 10:59:21 AM »
    There are no ferries from NB to Maine, however there is a ferry from Campobello to Dear Island, and another from Dear Island to mainland NB.  FWIW, Dear Island is where our 2000 Coachmen ended up, with the purchaser intending to snowbird in Florida this winter.
     There is a nice Provincial Park on Campobello at Wilson's Beach, where we swam in a pond separated from the Bay of Fundy, the temperature of the pond was in the high 70's, so we thought that we would cool off by going from it to the Bay, where we found out that it truly is bone chilling at under 50 F and that was mid August.
     Enjoy the rest of your trip, only next time plan of visiting Atlantic Canada, it is worth the time.

Ed
Ed & Donna
Winter-Pinellas Park FL, Summer- Maritime Canada
2000 Coachmen Catalina 34' DP (owned 2004 to 2015)
2006 Jeep Liberty Toad

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #56 on: September 29, 2015, 07:12:02 AM »
   
     Enjoy the rest of your trip, only next time plan of visiting Atlantic Canada, it is worth the time.

Ed

Thanks, Ed.  I have discovered that my idea of timing the leaves wasn't a good idea.  The leaves we've seen have been dull in color.  Locals tell us they had little rain in the last year and that is what brings the vibrant color.  We've encountered cold, but not the freezing that is required for the bright colors, also.  My favorite tree was a red maple that was gorgeous--but that's its color all the time.  We are predicted now to have a week or rain, so we are skipping Rockland and Rockport, where I had all outdoor activities planned.  We are moving on tomorrow to Augusta.  If/when we do the Maritimes, it will be in the summer!  Brrrr!  (I'm from the Land of Concrete & Sun)  I appreciate the trees up here--just beautiful in Acadia NP, but I miss my warmth.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #57 on: September 29, 2015, 10:17:13 AM »
Day 27      September 27, 2015       Trenton, Maine (near Bar Harbor)

We made the easy drive in about 2 hours and got here in time for Dean to go to the Seal Cove Auto Museum.   He reports that they had a "nice little collection of classics, spanning roughly 1904 to l928."  The collection includes bicycles and motorcycles.  Some of them are in driving condition and are driven to festivities in local cities.

Staying  at Timberland Acres RV Park--$38  FHU  Good satellite or forested, you pick, great hosts
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Hfx_Cdn

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #58 on: September 29, 2015, 11:00:44 AM »
    Jinda, don't forget with the high tides flushing the Bay of Fundy twice a day, the land along the coast stays cool all along that coast.  It was that cool clear air that attracted so many to establish summer homes near the Atlantic coast.  In the summer, you don't have to get too far inland to lose that effect and see temps in the 90s and 100s.  If you want to see the absence of trees, go see true sand deserts at Acadia National Park, or the Desert of Maine near Freeport, there is a nice campground adjacent to that one, and Freeport is the home of LL Bean.

Ed
Ed & Donna
Winter-Pinellas Park FL, Summer- Maritime Canada
2000 Coachmen Catalina 34' DP (owned 2004 to 2015)
2006 Jeep Liberty Toad

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #59 on: October 01, 2015, 08:36:39 PM »
    Jinda, don't forget with the high tides flushing the Bay of Fundy twice a day, the land along the coast stays cool all along that coast.  It was that cool clear air that attracted so many to establish summer homes near the Atlantic coast.  In the summer, you don't have to get too far inland to lose that effect and see temps in the 90s and 100s.  If you want to see the absence of trees, go see true sand deserts at Acadia National Park, or the Desert of Maine near Freeport, there is a nice campground adjacent to that one, and Freeport is the home of LL Bean.

Ed

Thanks, Ed.  We missed the deserts, but I put them in my log for next time.  We blew it on visiting Portland.  I was really looking forward to visiting the Wild Duck Campground in Audubon's Scarborough Marsh.  All the RV parks have been over 50% vacant, and a big rainstorm is coming in, so I didn't anticipate that they might be totally booked up, but they are.  We are now headed to Concord, Auburn, Manchester, Canterbury, and Cornish--all in NH.  We are booked for 3 nights at Calef Lake Camping Area near Auburn, and I have ideas for the others, except Cornish.  We may just stop and see the sights there on our way through.  If you have suggestions, please let me know.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

 

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