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Author Topic: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England  (Read 15121 times)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #90 on: October 22, 2015, 03:42:33 PM »
We are finally not parked in trees.  We thought our internet was faulty, but we're at Mohecan Sun, and everything is working great.  I will post as quickly as possible.  I still have to coordinate pictures, etc.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

HappyWanderer

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #91 on: October 23, 2015, 02:00:15 PM »
Good to hear from you,  I was thinking about you on those nights when the temperatures dropped into the teens. Thought maybe you caught the express to California.
I don't have gray hair. I have wisdom highlights.

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #92 on: October 24, 2015, 12:51:46 AM »
Good to hear from you,  I was thinking about you on those nights when the temperatures dropped into the teens. Thought maybe you caught the express to California.

We were super cold, as you'll see from some of my posts.  But, all is good now.  Thanks for your good thoughts.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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  • Posts: 1195
Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #93 on: October 24, 2015, 12:59:17 AM »

Day 44      October 14, 2015      Bellingham, MA (sort-of-near Boston)

We braved Boston traffic and spent a full, painful day, both for our bodies and our pocketbook, in Boston.  Parking several blocks away from the sites we wanted to see cost us $36 for the day!  But we couldn't take public transportation because of my scooter.  It was cold and windy, so we tried to make good time but were thwarted at every turn.

The streets were originally cowpaths and meander at strange angles up the hill. The streets have one name on the right and another on the left.  Maps are not very helpful.  The streets and sidewalks are either bumpy bricks or cobblestones, some of which are missing, making "potholes."  All sidewalks are angled toward the street, so keeping my scooter in a straight line killed my hands and shoulders.  Curbcuts for my scooter were often non-existent, so I would disembark and Dean would help me cross the street walking, then lift the front off the sidewalk, pull it forward, and lift it up on the other side of the street.  I previously thought of Boston as a progressive city of intelligent people.  We have never in our travels throughout 48 states encountered even a little town with such problems.  However, Bostonians are wonderful people.  They would see us pondering over the map and stop and give us directions.

Our first disappointment was that we couldn't go into the Old State House (1713) (Pic 1/6077) because it wasn't handicapped accessible--lots of steep steps.  We've encountered this kind of thing in other states, but usually they have installed a ramp or have taken video so I can see what it's like.  Nothing here.

After the Revolution, the leaders wanted a larger State House (Pic 2/6079), at the summit of Beacon Hill on land that had been a cow pasture for Governor John Hancock.  The cornerstone was laid on July 4, 1795 by Governor Sam Adams and Paul Revere, Grand Master of the Masons, and was finished in 1798..  The stone was drawn by 15 white horses, one for each of the states of the Union at that time.  The capitol cost $133,333.33.

There have been some major additions since then.  The capitol dome was originally made of wood and shingles.  Paul Revere & Sons coppered the dome in 1802 to prevent water leakage.  But it turned green.  So, seventy years later, they gilded the dome with 23-carat gold leaf for the first time, costing $2862.50.  The most recent gilding, in 1997, cost $300,000.

Just 80 years after its dedication, the legislature said the State house was too small.  Some wanted to build a new capitol in the geographic center of Massachusetts, but they decided to expand the original.  They had painted the original capitol yellow, so the addition was made of yellow brick.  In 1917, they added two white marble wings to the east and west. In the 1920's, they scraped the 26 layers of paint off the original and returned it to its original red color, so now the capitol is 3 different colors--red, yellow, and white. Picture 3/6092) is today's capitol.

Lincoln hated full-length portraits of him because he was self-conscious about his height.  There were only 4 done, and they were done after he died.  A portrait's price was determined by the number of limbs painted, and from that we get the saying that something cost "an arm and a leg."  This portrait was drawn from the $5 bill.

Nurses' Hall houses a statue of an Army war nurse (no particular nurse) and honors all the women of the North during the Civil War.  The hall is dedicated to Clara Barton, all the Civil War nurses, and Louisa May Alcott, who wrote about them.  On the walls are several impressive paintings about the start of the American Revolution--the Boston Tea Party and Paul Revere's ride.  But, my favorite was of the fiery orator James Otis who is pictured arguing against the Writs of Assistance, which let the British soldiers come into the colonists' homes and search for smuggled goods. He didn't receive money, even though it was offered from the Boston merchants who retained him.  He stood up for what he believed.

Like most New England states, Boston has a Hall of Flags which houses copies of the return of the regimental flags at the end of the Civil War.  They have put the originals in an environmentally-controlled storage area, and they are going to make new cabinets that are climate-controlled.  They have flags from the Spanish-American War, World Wars I and II, the Korean War, the Berlin emergency, and the Vietnam War.  No longer are there state regiments. There are lots of beautiful, historical murals here, too.   The French decorated the Massachusett's flag of the 104th U. S. infantry regiment because of their valor, the one and only time they've done that for a foreign government.  This is shown in a mural.  (Picture 4/6086)

Massachusetts is especially proud of the 6th regiment from the Civil War.  They were the first to respond that they were ready to serve when Lincoln called for volunteers.  They were the first to shed blood, too.  They have a pretty memorial as well as a large, beautiful mural.

In 1884, Governor Butler made the journey alone from the front door of the State House down the front steps, establishing the tradition of the "Long Walk."  Since then, the middle doors of the State House are opened only to allow a governor who is ending a term of office to depart, or an active head of state to enter.  Even JFK entered through the side door because, while he had been elected President, he had not yet been sworn in.  The president of Peru made the walk two years ago.  William Howard Taft is the last U. S. president to enter here.

There are 160 members of the House of Representatives (125 Dem-35 Rep).  They vote electronically with "yea" or "nay" buttons, and their vote is reported on an electronic board.  Members of both houses serve for 2 years.    By law, they must meet every 3 days (72 hours)--regardless of holidays, etc.  Hanging over the public gallery is the famous Sacred Cod, symbolizing the importance of the fishing industry in early Massachusetts.  It is the third one, as the other two were stolen.   It was given to the House in 1784 by a Boston merchant.  The House was in session, so we couldn't take any pictures.

There are 40 members of the Senate (34Dem-6Rep), and 39 of them sit in a circle of desks.  The 40th, the Senate President, is elected and sits at the rostrum under the golden eagle. (Picture 5/6089)  Traditionally, this post goes to the most senior senator, regardless of party.  Voting is done by voice.  The bust at the front of the chamber was thought to be of Samuel Adams.  However, Lafayette corrected them when he commented, "That's the Washington I knew."  Lafayette was a great friend of the American people,  He came to Boston to help George Washington.  In 1778, he cut off the British retreat, and without  his actions the colonists would not have won the Revolutionary War when they did or not at all.  He wanted to be buried in American soil, so Massachusetts packed a boxful of dirt and shipped it to France when he died.  He is recognized with a bust near the visitors' area.   Not to be outdone by the House, the Senate adopted the "holy mackerel" to hang in their house.  (Picture 6/6091) The Senate is the center of Boston, and the place from which all other places in Massachusetts are measured.

Massachusetts is proud that they were anti-slavery.   In 1853 during a U. S. Senate session, General Sumner who was a United States senator from Massachusetts, gave a speech called "Crime Against Kansas."  He insulted every delegate from South Carolina.  Two days later, while he was signing copies of his speech, Preston Brooks, a U. S. representative, picked up a brass-tipped cane and hit him over the head 30 times.  He was trapped, seated at his desk, and he finally was able to rip his desk out of the floor and escape.  He spent two years recovering.  Massachusetts did not elect anyone to replace him.  They felt that his absence would serve a purpose.    When he died, he laid in state here.

We timed our visit to the Governor's Office waiting room well because Governor Charlie Baker came through as we were looking at the portraits of recent governors.  Each governor chooses to put the portrait of their favorite past governor in the office to watch over them and guide them.   Gov. Dukakis chose Samuel Adams, and Governor Romney chose John Hancock.  There are no term limits for any politicians.  Dukakis served the longest, at 12 years, but they were not consecutive terms.  In second place is John Hancock, with 11 years, also not consecutive. They have had one woman governor, but she was lieutenant governor who got elevated and was not elected to the office. The governor is republican.

Massachusetts has had a series of state seals and they have beautiful stained glass replicas in a large window. (Pics 7 & 8/6081 & 6085)  The current motto is in Latin and means "By the sword we seek peace, but peace only under liberty."

Afterwards, we went to Faneuil to take the ranger-led tour of the Freedom Trail.  However, this was not available to me because of the condition of the sidewalks, streets, and lack of curbcuts.  Faneuil Hall was where Bostonians protested the taxation policies of the British, as well as serving as a marketplace for the local townspeople to market their goods.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #94 on: October 25, 2015, 11:11:44 AM »

Day 47      October 17,  2015   Bellingham, MA

We decided to visit Plymouth as a day trip since there were only 3 places we wanted to visit.  The Pilgrim Hall Museum is the oldest continuously open museum in the United States.  They only allowed us to photograph the entry pictures (1,2,3/6098, 6099, 6100).  I was fascinated by all that I learned today.  They had many Pilgrim and Plymouth real artifacts.

In 1532, Henry VIII declared that the English church would be independent of the pope, and he formed his own church.  Later, in the 1500's, some English believed that reforms were necessary to "purify" the church.  In the 1600's, everyone had to be a member of the Church of England and pay their tithes.  If they didn't, they were guilty of treason and were imprisoned,  burned at the stake, or beaten, so they left for Holland.  After a few years, their children started to assimilate and become "Dutch children."  They were intermarrying, and the parents became concerned. 

So the Puritans bought the Speedwell in Holland and leased the Mayflower in England to bring them to the New World.  The Mayflower came with a captain, crew, and other passengers who didn't believe in the Puritan ways. The Speedwell leaked so badly that they returned to England three times, and they decided to send the Mayflower over alone.  Some of the Puritans had to wait for a later voyage.  It took 10 years to transfer most of the Puritans to Plymouth.  The Mayflower was an old ship designed to take freight, so there were no beds or comforts.  At one point, the main beam cracked and had to be repaired using a large iron screw.  Everyone, even the kids, drank beer.  In England, if you drank water, it might kill you.  They ate salted meats and hardtack on the voyage.  A baby, Oceanus Hopkins, was born.  The trip took 66 days.

The Puritans were given a patent giving permission for them to settle in "the northern parts of Virginia." Anyone wanting to settle had to have permission from the king of England to settle.  When they landed at the wrong spot, now Providence Harbor, they were almost out of beer.  Scouts were sent out to explore Cape Cod and find a spot to settle.  An exploring party sailed up the coast and chose Plymouth, where they found fresh water in a spring and called it "sweet water."  Scouts also came on a place where the Native Americans stored corn underground in baskets, and they confiscated it to use for  seed.  They decided to petition the king for a new charter for the new location.  They never received one.

 Some of the passengers wanted to go their own way when they landed, but they realized they needed everyone to be able to survive, so they wrote the Mayflower Compact.  They all agreed to work together and share. The Compact allowed them to govern themselves in a democratic fashion.

The Puritans bought land from the Native Americans, but the natives expected to continue to use the lands' resources.  When the colonists built fences, it caused problems.

In 1685, the colonial government was restructured and charters were revoked.  Plymouth Colony became part of the United Colonies of New England.  Plymouth was not given its own charter.

The first exhibit room was fascinating!  It told about how the Puritans (They were not called Pilgrims until the 1800's) handled their funerals.    Governor William Bradford logged the trip and referring to Scripture, he wrote, "they knew they were pilgrims" in reference to a verse in Hebrews.  But it was 200 years later that the term Pilgrim was popularized.  It is likely they never ever heard the word "Pilgrim."  Passengers on the first 4 ships were called "First Comers." 

In the funerals of the 1630's, they "carried and buried" you on the same day you died.  Clothing was too expensive to be buried with the dead.  The body was cleaned and dressed in a simple long shirt.  Embalming was forbidden by Puritans in England, but it was occasionally done in New England.  The body was wrapped in a wool or linen shroud, and tied at the above the head and below the feet with rope.  Flowers or sprigs of rosemary were wrapped with the cloth to mask the odors.  There was no ceremony or prayers.  They came together dressed in black at the tolling of a bell, carried the deceased to the grave, and stood silently as the grave was filled in with dirt. If there was enough time and money, a wooden coffin was used.  It had a swinging door at one end for those who couldn't afford it, so it could be used many times.  These may have been used in New England during the plague.  The descendant's estate paid for the grave diggers.   Gravemarkers were simple and just had the name and year of death.

Burial grounds were set apart at the town's founding.  They often did double duty as cow pastures and were neglected.  Sometimes graves were dug at random locations, but usually families were grouped together.

As they became more established, they published "broadsides", printed elegies of important people.  At the top, there were crossed bones, winged skulls, coffin pictures, a pick, axe, and shovel that were crossed, and the words "Remember Death."  They made mourning rings of gold with a hollow space for the deceased's hair, and see-through spaces in the ring to see it.  These were given out to guests as mementos, though more often they were just for the wife or immediate family.  They had the name and date of death engraved on these small rings.  They were kind of creepy!

In the early 1800's, descendants of the early Puritans created much more elaborate obelisks and tombstones honoring their forefathers.

In the art area, there was a spectacular large oil painting of "The Landing of the Pilgrims" by Henry Sargent. He was a forefather of the more famous John Singer Sargent. It has hung on the wall in Pilgrim Hall since 1824.  The museum recently spent 2.5 months restoring and cleaning it and re-gilding the frame.  The Pilgrims landed on December 12, 1620.  There was no mention of Plymouth Rock in the 17th century records.  The Pilgrims were not met by any natives.  Not until March, 1621, did they meet their first "Indian," Samoset, who strolled into their village almost naked.  He brought Massasoit, the sachem (chief), and they made a treaty for 50 years.  It is the only treaty with Europeans that was never broken.

 In 1741, a 95-year-old man identified Plymouth Rock as the Pilgrims' landing spot.  He had known several Pilgrims.  So, it's just hearsay.

When the Sons of Liberty moved Plymouth Rock in 1774, it broke in two.  The top was brought to Town Square and then to Pilgrim Hall, where I touched it today.  The bottom is at the waterfront.

Longfellow's poem, "The Courtship of Miles Standish," was written in 1858.  The true history of it is that Priscilla's parents both died in the first winter.  51 of 102 Puritans died that first winter, but 25 of the 35 children survived, and two more were born.  Priscilla married John Alden.   Miles Standish was a widower, and legend told of his love for Priscilla.  He remarried later.

The spinning wheel was a faulty symbol of the Puritans.  There were no sheep in Plymouth Colony to give them the wool, and growing flax was not feasible.   I taught my students so much misinformation.  I wish I could retract those words.

We drove about a mile to the waterfront, where we saw "the rock" (Picture 4/6103) and had lunch at a restaurant famous for their fried lobster.  We eat almost no fried food, so that is probably why I didn't care for it at all.

We drove about 15 minutes to Plimouth Plantation (not a typo).   400 years ago there were no set rules for spelling, and writers of the time spelled phoenetically.  Sometimes they intentionally used different spellings of the same word on the same page.  This is the spelling most frequently used by Governor William Bradford in his history.  The difference also helps differentiate the Museum  from the modern town of Plymouth.

PP is a reconstruction of the original Plymouth area including a Wampanoag homesite with real Native Americans making items as they would have been made then.  They know their history and were very interesting.  The Wampanoag (pronounced Wampanaaak) were the only Native People who lived alongside the Pilgrims. The Wampanoag in Picture 5/6109 is sitting in a shade structure that they would have built in the summer, kind of like our patio covers.  Picture 6/6110  is a typical summertime home, with a smokehole in the top.  Picture 7/6111 is the typical wintertime home, with multiple layers of bark and a protected area which keeps the wind from blowing in through the front door (deerskin)

At the Craft Center, a large building, the Pilgrim crafts (knitting, pottery making, bread making, candle dipping) were demonstrated. There was a fort/meetinghouse that was interesting, especially the windows.

We found humor in the Mooflower (Picture 10/ 6116).  In 2006, a CowParade was held in Boston to raise money for cancer cures.  There were 200 life-size pows who were positioned so they were "grazing" the streets.  This was the exhibit from the PP.

The 1627 Pilgrim Village had 16 building with re-enactors who were also very knowledgeable and skilled.  (Pictures 8 & 9/6113/6114)  The whittler here was making a scoop for grain.  It was bitter cold (40's) and a breeze blew through us, so we hurried through and didn't enjoy this the $48 it cost us.  It was well done.  We opted to return to our warm car instead of going down to the Mayflower II.

13 days at one campsite is a new record for us.  Boston area has a lot to do, and our camp is at least an hour from most attractions (depending on traffic).

Staying at Circle CG Campground.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #95 on: October 25, 2015, 11:23:31 AM »
More pictures...
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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  • Posts: 1195
Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #96 on: October 25, 2015, 11:38:28 AM »

Day 45      October 15,  2015   Bellingham, MA (sort-of-near Boston)
      
Today we went into Salem to learn about the "witch trials."  We started at the NPS Visitors' Center and saw a short, interesting film.  Salem Village (agricultural area around Salem) was known for a lot of disputes, and they were in big conflict with Salem Town.  In 1672, the villagers votes to hire their own minister since many of the arguments were over church privileges and practices.  Their first 2 ministers in the next 10 years stayed only a few years each because the congregation didn't pay them their agreed-upon salary.  The next minister left after the church in Salem refused to ordain him.  In 1689, the villagers agreed to hire Samuel Parris.  He was to be paid 1/3 in money and 2/3 in "provisions."  They granted him the deed to the parsonage and two acres just 4 months later.  He was filled with failures.  He had failed in two businesses when everyone else with the same businesses had thrived and dropped out of Harvard.  He viewed this as his last chance to have a successful life.  His enthusiasm caused his congregation to grow initially, but during services, he shamed members of  his congregation over minor infractions.  Villagers were expected to go to church for 3-hour sermons every Wednesday and Sunday.  His membership numbers declined.  Villagers were supposed to pay the ministers' fee monthly, no matter what, but they didn't.

A beggar woman came to the Parris's home, and Samuel decided she was responsible for his problems and therefore a witch.  His daughter had a "fit", and therefore he felt this woman had put the devil in her.  When people got sick or had misfortune or his daughter had another fit, he proclaimed this to be the work of a witch.  Later, his daughter admitted that she faked her fits.  In the next year, 14 women and 6 men were executed, 19 by hanging and 1 by crushing (putting heavy stones on top of him).  Samuel Parris and his family left the village and the ministry.

In modern times, a memorial was built to those innocents next to the graveyard.  It is a series of benches with each "witch's name," and method of execution.  (Picture 1)

We went to lunch at Turner's Seafood, which is known for lobster pie and lobster bisque.  My lobster bisque and Dean's clam chowder were excellent.  Our waitress said that she didn't believe in ghosts (past tense).  One corner of the restaurant is on the spot in an orchard where a witch named Annie was hung.  Our waitress said that she started hearing someone calling her by her birth name, a name no one else knows but her.  She has heard this several times, and she is now a believer in ghosts.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

ArdraF

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #97 on: October 25, 2015, 05:05:50 PM »
Linda, your narratives are so interesting!  Loved your comment about wishing you could take back some of what you told your students.  It makes you wonder what else we were told that wasn't quite accurate!  We visited Plimouth Plantation many years ago and really enjoyed it.  Glad to see it's still an interesting place to visit.  It looks like the weather is nice with blue skies and sun.

ArdraF
ArdraF
:D :D

HappyWanderer

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #98 on: October 25, 2015, 10:20:31 PM »
It's interesting to note that the Wampanoag spoken language had been dead for over a hundred years. About 20 years ago, tribal members started a project to bring it back and teach the members. There's quite a bit about it online and it makes good reading.

My grandfather was Wampanoag and had an extensive collection of Native American artifacts, which were donated to several museums upon his death.
I don't have gray hair. I have wisdom highlights.

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #99 on: October 26, 2015, 02:01:40 AM »

Day 54      October 24,  2015   Uncasville

The Pequot tribe is most famous for owning the largest casino in the United States, Foxwoods, which employs 12,000 people..  This has enabled them to build the Pequot Museum, which I think is the best Native Peoples' museum in the United States.  It is a gorgeous building, which has an observation tower.  (Picture 1/6201) They incorporate respect for the Earth and all its people throughout.  Admission was $30/2 people. 

When we first entered, we needed to eat lunch.  The "Indian" taco that I had and the burger that Dean had were good, but the best part was that the paper plates were compostable (and they do compost them) and the knife and fork were wooden, which would easily break down, too.  There was no junk food available.  The taco bread was whole grain.  The chips (we didn't buy any) were baked and multi-grain.

We were told that we could take pictures, but we couldn't use flash, so I apologize for the dark quality of some pictures.  We saw a 36-foot long dugout mishoon (canoe) that Pequot made from a tulip poplar tree in the spring of this year.  They chose a tall, straight tree, and felled it with carefully controlled fires around the base.  Then they removed the bark and branches.  Burning logs were placed on top of the tree, and the smoldering fire would hollow out the tree.  Then they used shells or stones to chip out the charred wood.  They used a scraper or quahog shell to smooth the canoe.  They put a big beak on the front of it to help break the waves.  These canoes were very sturdy.  Building a 12-foot long mishoon would take one man 10-12 days.(Picture 2/6182)

Originally, the Pequot were hunters and gatherers.  But, they also planted gardens and fished from their mishoons.

Epanow was captured in 1611 and escaped in 1614.  He outwitted his captors with promises of gold on Nope (Martha's Vineyard).  Captain Hobson brought him to his home harbor, and 4 members of his tribe brought out items to trade.  While they were on board, they hatched an escape plan.  They left, and the next day, Epanow dove off the ship and mishoons with many warriors rained arrows on the sailors so he could get away. 

We viewed an interesting 30-minute film. In 1614, Captain John Smith and his sailors scouted New England.  Patuxet (Plymouth) was a Wampanoag village of about 2,000 people.  As they were ready to leave, Thomas Hunt tricked and captured 27 Wampanoag natives, including Squanto by offering to trade knives, combs, pots, glasses, coats, and blankets for furs.  They were their tribes best hunters.  He sold them into slavery in Spain.  Squanto was exploited as a "wonder" for people to gawk at.  Between 1616-1619, the Wampanoag of Patuxet were all killed by disease.  When Squanto returned in 1620, he found the village empty.  Other Pequots were living in nearby areas.

The English defended their kidnappings by saying they were rescuing them from the wilderness, that they needed to be converted to Christianity, that they needed to learn Native customs and language, to display them for the curious, and to sell them into the slave trade.

 The 1630s were a time of increasing troubles between the Pequot and the colonists living in the Connecticut River Valley and Massachusetts Bay. The English, Dutch, and the Pequot all wanted control of the beaver trade in Connecticut.  It was very lucrative.  There were  disagreements, and in 1634, the Dutch kidnapped a Pequot sachem (chief).  The Pequot retaliated 2 years later by killing an Englishman, John Stone. The English demanded "the head" of the man who killed Stone, and the Pequot would not hand him over.  The English allied themselves with the Pequot's old enemies, the Narragansett.  The Narragansett did not believe in killing children and women, and the English promised to abide by their agreement not to do so.  At Fort Saybrook, the Indians drew the English out of the fort, and then the Pequot were hidden in the trees, and they dropped down atop the soldiers.   In late 1636, the English attacked a Pequot village.  The Narragansett were supposed to be the second wave.  The English burned Pequot wigwams, destroyed crops, and killed 12 or 200 or 600 Pequot (depends on which of their signs you believe), including women and children, breaking their deal with the Narragansett.  The Pequots retaliated with attacks on English settlements.  In 1637, the Pequots took two girls hostage and killed nine colonists.  Their leaders knew they were in danger.  So families gathered up their essential possessions, and warriors took the women and children by mishoon to Long Island, where they could be protected by friends.  Captured Pequot were sent to England as slaves or given to the Narragansett as slaves.  They were never one people again.  They are two nations now.

The Pequot have worked hard to preserve traditional practices and learn as much as possible about their ancestors' way of life.  They have a large research center.  They support cultural festivals, special event days, and performances by Foxwoods Dance Troupe and the Mystic River Singers. They teach their kids traditional stories and crafts, like beading, ceramics, and making regalia.  They wear traditional attire on special days.  They are entitled to use eagle feathers.  The eagle is considered sacred because he carries prayers to the Great Spirit in the Sky.  The Pequot support the American Indian Indigenous Games where Natives compete in track and field, swimming, basketball, and archery.

One display area has Earth creation stories from many of the major tribes in the United States.  As we walked through glaciers, we saw displays of geology and animal life of long ago. 

They re-created a Pequot village of the 1600s. (Pictures 3, 4, 5/6188, 6191, 6196).  There are about a dozen scenes of excellent quality.

The Pequot are governed by a 7-member Tribal Council, led by a Council Chairman and an Elders Council, which is composed of all tribal members 55-year-old or older.  The Tribal Council makes laws about the tribe and its property, manages natural resources, maintains relations with other tribal nations, and the local, state, and federal government.  The Elder Council advises the Tribal Council and determines membership.  They have the power to deny access to tribal property to anyone.

The Pequot now own hotels, build high-speed passenger ferries, and own golf courses and restaurants.  From their casino profits and the above, they fund a child development center, a tribal health center with all the latest and best, a post office, housing for members, and a community center with lots of activities.  They have a 2-year college and they provide scholarships so their young can advance. They contributed $5 million to a new beluga whale exhibit at Mystic Aquarium and $10 million to the Smithsonian Institute for a new National Museum of the American Indian, $2 million to the 1985 Special Olympics that was held in the area, and much, much more locally.

There was so much more I would have enjoyed learning about, but they are closed Sunday-Tuesday. 

Boondocking at Mohecan Sun Casino.  Free.  Very Nice.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #100 on: October 26, 2015, 02:04:15 AM »
Linda, your narratives are so interesting!  Loved your comment about wishing you could take back some of what you told your students.  It makes you wonder what else we were told that wasn't quite accurate!  We visited Plimouth Plantation many years ago and really enjoyed it.  Glad to see it's still an interesting place to visit.  It looks like the weather is nice with blue skies and sun.

ArdraF

We've had really cold, windy, freezing days, and some nice high 60s days.  Plimouth was a bitterly cold day, and we would have stayed longer and learned more if the weather had been better.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #101 on: October 26, 2015, 02:09:08 AM »
It's interesting to note that the Wampanoag spoken language had been dead for over a hundred years. About 20 years ago, tribal members started a project to bring it back and teach the members. There's quite a bit about it online and it makes good reading.

My grandfather was Wampanoag and had an extensive collection of Native American artifacts, which were donated to several museums upon his death.

Native groups have "lost" so much, and it can't be retrieved.  One of the things that I admired about the Pequot Museum was that they were honest and said, "Based on this and this and this, we believe......"  At other "Indian" museums, they backfill a lot and present it as truth.  It is so sad that they can't get their culture and language back.  I am so glad that your grandfather's artifacts got to good places.  Research is a key feature and heavily emphasized at the Pequot Museum.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #102 on: October 26, 2015, 09:17:25 AM »
Day 53      October 23,  2015     Uncasville

The Wadsworth Athenean was the castle-like home of a prominent Hartford family.  George Washington slept here.  The statue of Nathan Hale greeted us.  He is famous for volunteering to go to New York to spy on the British.  He was very accomplished at age 21 and a Yale graduate.  He was caught and given a sentence of death by hanging.  His response was to say, "I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country."  He is Connecticut's most famous citizen. (Picture 1/6171).

"Tents at Lake O'Hara" by John Singer Sargent was one of our favorite paintings (Picture 2/6167).

"The Charter Oak" (Picture 3/6169) is a portrait of the cherished Charter Oak tree.  The wood frame is carved from the famous oak.  According to legend, the Connecticut charter guaranteeing the colony's right to self-government was hidden in the oak's hollow by Daniel Wadsworth's ancestor Joseph Wadsworth in 1698.  The King of England revoked all the colonies' charters, but Connecticut refused to return theirs.  The British governor of New England brought a lot of soldiers from Massachusetts to seize it.   The blue onion dome of the Colt firearms factory, another powerful Hartford symbol--is visible in the distance, to the right of the oak.

One section displayed beautiful colonial furniture.  Dean and I thought this was a fountain or basin when we first saw this, but then we saw the soft cloth insides.  It is the Colt Family Cradle. (Picture 4/6163) Samuel Colt (famous for his guns) commissioned a cradle to honor his newborn son.  A German woodcarver and piano maker carved this from the famous Charter Oak Tree.  All of the Colt pistols were carved in great detail.  Carved in the bark is a verse which reminds young Samuel to follow the example of the tree and defend his country whenever it is in danger and that he should die for his country, rather than let anybody hurt it.

Staying at Mohecan Sun Casino
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #103 on: October 30, 2015, 06:14:29 PM »
Day 57      October 27,  2015   Clarksboro, NJ

New Jersey's capitol (Pic 1/6228) has the most stringent security of the 44+ capitols we have visited.  They lost 691 people on 9/11, and they want to protect their capital as much as possible.  You must go on a tour--you are not allowed to walk in the halls unaccompanied.  The tours are on the hour, and you cannot enter the capitol until 5 minutes before the tour.  They screen you and you go into a small holding area.

The "est" of this capitol is the it was the first to have electricity because Thomas Edison's lab and home were in New Jersey.  It was also the QUICKest tour- (20 minutes)-She spoke and walked at the speed of Japan's Bullet Train. I made good use of my 2 years of shorthand classes.   She probably says this script 5 times a day, and she's been doing it for years.  She is a paid state employee.

In 1790, the legislature decided to build the capitol in Trenton because it was located on the Delaware River, a convenient method of travel, and was equi-distant from the south or north.  New Jersey's State House was originally built in 1792, and has been extensively added to, remodeled, replaced, and re-constructed by 17 architects with 17 architectural styles.   Part of the original structure still exists, making it the second oldest in continuous use.  Maryland's capitol is the oldest.
 
The first area was a rotunda with portraits of the first 10 governors and stained glass windows.  The governorship was intended to be a very weak position, appointed by the legislature, which was elected.  They didn't want the governors to be king-like, so they gave them only 1-year terms.  As we walked around, we saw one governor who served for two years, was out for one year, and then back in for eleven years.  The longest term was one governor with 14 one-year terms.  In 1844, the legislator gave them greater power and 3-year terms.  Governors now have 4-year terms. Governors may serve two terms.  Then they have to leave office for one term, and they are then eligible to run for governor again. 

A dome is above the rotunda/lobby, which was right off State Street and was seen as a gathering place for the people.  In 1889, they gilded the dome.  When they last remodeled in 1999, they re-gilded it.  (Picture 2/6208)

One of the stained glass windows is the State Seal.  (Picture 3/6211)  New Jersey's first legislature hired a French immigrant to create the state's original seal in 1776.   On the Great Seal of New Jersey the horse represents speed and strength, and is New Jersey's state animal.  Liberty (left) symbolizes the fight for independence.   The three plows on the center shield and Ceres, the Roman goddess of grain, represent the importance of the farming industry.  (We have been amazed at how much land is planted--mainly corn, cabbage, and lettuce.)  In the State Museum we saw huge glass bells that are placed over the plants to protect them from frost.  The Great Seal is used to authenticate official documents.

We got to tour the governor's foyer.  No pictures were allowed inside, so we got the door (Pic 4/6213) He must have at least 10 secretary-type people, which is by far the most of any state in recent memory. 
We didn't get to see the inside of his office.  Woodrow Wilson is the only New Jersey governor to become president. 
 
"Liberty and Prosperity" is the state motto and recurs throughout the capitol.   Each  county has its own flag on display at the Capitol.  The four state symbols the state tree, the red oak, the state flower, the purple violet, the state insect, the honeybee, and the state bird, the goldfinch are always together and are showcased in many places in the Capitol.  (Pic 5/6215)  The surrounding marble had a moderate orange hue, which really intensified in our pictures.

New Jersey has a bicameral legislature.  Only Nebraska has a unicameral legislature.  The General Assembly and Senate meet from September to June on Mondays and/or Thursdays.  A bill may originate in either house, but appropriations bills must begin in the Senate and end in the Assembly.  Members of both houses may abstain.  Both houses have gone pretty much paperless.

The state is divided into 80 districts.  There are 48 Democrats and 32 Republicans in the Assembly. (Pic 6/6217)  All of the desks in both houses are 1891 original desks, and really quite nice.  Members of each house make $49,500 per year. 

As we entered the Senate, Greek goddesses "Liberty and Prosperity" were over the door.  (Pic 7/6219)  The Senate is modeled after the Roman Senate or House of Lords.  Murals surround the perimeter.
(Pictures 8, 9, 10/6221, 6223, 6225).

We got to the Capitol at a few minutes after the hour, and we were not about to wait outside in the cold, so we went 1 block away to  the warmth of The New Jersey State Museum (free).  They displayed art either by New Jersey residents or of New Jersey scenes.  They showed Native American artifacts, 19th century household items, and natural history. 

The most interesting sections to me were "Nano-the Science of Tiny," which explained how tiny particles will bring cures and make our lives better and the flag of The USS New Jersey (The Black Dragon).  She (?  I think I heard somewhere that ships were shes) was the most-decorated battleship in the Navy and saw service in three wars.  She was launched on the first anniversary of Pearl Harbor.  She had nine  huge 16" guns that could shoot for 24 miles.  I wonder how far today's ships can shoot.

Staying at Timberlane Campground--$82.80/2 nights, FHU.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #104 on: October 30, 2015, 07:03:20 PM »
More pictures....
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #105 on: November 01, 2015, 09:46:15 AM »

Day 59      October 29, 2015   Harrisburg, PA

Throughout the United States, capital buildings are being restored to their original state.  Pennsylvania's capital is no different.  The fountain has been undergoing reconstruction since the spring.  It is already 3 times the anticipated cost.  The parts they needed for repair were so old that they are no longer made.  So they have had to make them individually by hand. 

The Capitol in Harrisburg is spectacular!  When President Theodore Roosevelt attended the dedication in 1906, he said, "This is the handsomest building I ever saw."  It was designed in the American Renaissance style.  The architect envisioned it as a Palace of Art, and it is by far the most artistic and decorated capital in the U. S.  It cost $13 million, which may be the most expensive capital.  The paintings, stained glass, and furnishings were done by some of the best artisans in the world at that time.  All of the ornate doorknobs have the state seal engraved on them, and it is on all the elevators.  Various areas are themed--Italian in the House Chamber, French in the Senate Chamber, and English in the Governor's Reception Room.  But, it all blends together beautifully.  At the top of the dome is "Commonwealth," a gilded-bronze statue of a female figure representing Pennsylvania.  She holds a mace of statehood in her left and extends her right hand.

It is so enormous that it is impossible to photograph.  (Picture 1/6231).  We entered through a very modern, sleek annex that is attached on several sides of the original capital.  The annex houses the offices for the senators and representatives.

This is also the newest capitol we've visited recently, maybe ever.  In  1682 when William Penn founded Pennsylvania, the Provincial Assembly had no official meeting place, moving between Philadelphia's Town Hall, meeting houses, schools, taverns, inns, and private homes.  Starting in 1735, they met in Independence Hall.  When the British troops occupied Philadelphia, the Assembly moved to Lancaster.  In 1790, they ratified the Pennsylvania Constitution and created the House of Representatives and Senate.  They debated what the location of their capital should be for 20 years, and they chose Harrisburg.  The first capital was build from 1819-1822.  In 1897, the capital burned down while they were in session, probably due to a faulty fireplace flue.  We've heard this about so many of the capitals.  In 1898, a new building was constructed for $550,000.  It was considered so undignified and unattractive that it was never completed.  However, the General Assembly met in the unfinished building.  In 1904, they started building a new capital.  In 1987, the new West Wing was opened.

The Rotunda entry is jaw-dropping amazing.  The glass and brass elevators sparkle; the Grand Staircase was truly grand.  The dome overhead weighs 26 tons and is 272 feet above the floor--four stories high plus open air.  It is lit by 4,000 lights.(Pic 2/6232)  The rotunda is so magnificent and rich with symbols that it is used for announcements, bill-signings and press conferences. There are eight large murals about Pennsylvania's history (Pic 3/6234) and reclining goddesses (Pic 4/6239).  Even the floor tiles are symbolic.  The floor is colorful Moravian tiles and interspersed with 400 tile mosaics illustrating the state's history, animals, industries, occupations, and modes of transportation.  There are 200 clocks in the Capitol that have to be hand-wound once a week.

Beautiful marble sculptures of 27 figures flank both sides of the 17-foot tall ornate bronze doors at the main entrance.  Each door weighs a ton, but can swing open at the push of one hand.

Pennsylvania is one of only 5 full-time capitols.  They meet on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays from September to June.  They spend Thursdays and Fridays at their district office.

 Unfortunately, when they let visitors on the floor of the legislature, vandalism occurred, so they won't let anyone on the floor of either house unless they are accompanied by a member of that house.  We could only see the House from the gallery one floor above.  We haven't encountered this before, and all Dean's pictures came out dark because he only had his normal flash, not his external flash.  It is a real shame because it was glorious.

In the House, (Pic 5/6250) there is a 35-foot square painting behind the Speaker's chair that grabs your attention as you enter.  It depicts distinguished state residents at the feet of a figure representing the "Genius of State."  Penn is in the center in a red robe, and Benjamin Franklin is at his right hand.  The lights hanging from the ceiling are huge. (Pic 6/6243)   The ceiling is recessed in sections and very ornate. (Pic 7/6245)   The House Chamber also has magnificent murals and original mahogany desks. The 10 stained glass windows are themed, like "Religion" (Pictures 8 & 9/6246 & 6247)  The stained-glass windows are framed in 24-karat gold leaf. 

There are 203 members of the House (119 R and 94 D) and they serve two-year terms.  They elect the Speaker of the House.  Democrats sit on the left, and Republicans on the right.  They have a huge ornate mace, which is a symbol of authority, peace, and order, dating back to Roman times.  It is 46 inches long, topped with a brass sphere that is engraved on both sides with the Coat of Arms, and an eagle at the very top.  We last saw a mace in Victoria, BC, Canada, and I don't think we've seen one in any other state.   Six crystal chandeliers light the House.  They weigh between two tons and four tons and require over 1,000 light bulbs. 

The Senate started with only 18 Senators, but now there are 50 (30 R and 20 D).  They serve four-year terms.  They use a voice vote system.  When they vote, their whole name lights up red if they vote "no" and green if they vote "yes."  In other states, they just have a little red or green light by their names.
Democrats sit on the left, Republicans on the right. 

They have lovely mahogany large desks that were used in 1906. Rare green Irish marble is on the walls.  On the floor, there are 4 massive gold brass lights weighing 5,000 pounds each at the front.  Everything that is gold-colored in the whole capital is 23 Karat gold-leaf.  They started re-gilding the Capitol in 1985; it took 21 years to do it because there is so much gold throughout the Capitol.  Gold symbols surround the Senate chamber.  There are beautiful murals of events in Pennsylvania history and huge gold statues.  There are 14 stained glass windows, each with 4 layers of glass and a theme.  The lights had symbolic statues inside them. (Pic 10/6251)

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court is unique in many ways.  It is the oldest supreme court in the U. S.  Only 12 supreme courts in the U. S. are still housed in the Capitol buildings. It is the only travelling supreme court and roves between Harrisburg, Philadelphia, and Pittsburgh.  It is very large and beautiful.  It has 16 intricate paintings.  One of the paintings intrigued me.  It's a "keynote" painting.  If you look at it carefully, you can see the words "love," "law," and "wisdom," are almost hidden in "Divine Law. (Pic 11/6253)  A keystone is the center stone in an arch which holds the arch together.  Pennsylvania says it is the Keystone State because they were what held the colonies together. There is a beautiful green stained glass dome above (Picture 12/6254).

Our tour guide had hurried us through the tour, so we returned to the Senate to admire the stained glass windows and murals.  Pic 13/6261 was about the Militia.   Pic 14/6265 honored the role of the railroads.  Pic 15/6267 is a great mural and encircling it was the saying, "Let us raise a standard to which the wise and honest can repair the events in the hands of God.  Picture 16/6269 shows a bright light lit with a 25-watt bulb, the only kind available in 1906.  They cut diamonds in the glass to diffuse the light and make it brighter.

As we left, we saw the most photogenic State Seal on the back wall of the elevator.  Unlike most state seals, it has an obverse and reverse.  The observe has a central image of a shield with a ship under full sail, a plow and three sheaves of wheat.  They represent the importance of commerce, labor, perseverance, and agriculture to the state's economy.  On either side of the shield are a stalk of Indian corn and an olive branch, recognizing the past and hopes for the future.  On top of the shield an eagle proudly symbolizes the state's sovereignty.  The reverse side pictures Lady Liberty dominating Tyranny in the form of a lion, with the words, "Both Can't Survive."

We have seen about 45 capitals.  I think this is the most magnificent, though Dean thinks Frankfort is.  I'd visit this capital again if we're in the area.  The murals are just spectacular, and I'd like to linger and enjoy.  Beauty is everywhere--even their glass elevators.  It is super handicapped-accessible.

Stayed at Walmart Harrisburg
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #106 on: November 01, 2015, 09:50:20 AM »
More pictures
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
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2006 Airstream Motor Home
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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #107 on: November 01, 2015, 09:56:52 AM »
More pictures
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and Sherlock (the cat)
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ArdraF

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #108 on: November 01, 2015, 06:35:26 PM »
I've visited a lot of state capitols but I don't think I've ever been in the one in my state of birth.  Your narrative and photos make me think maybe we should go there the next time we're in the vicinity.  I'm not sure I've ever been to Harrisburg either!  But then I haven't lived in Pa. since high school.

ArdraF
ArdraF
:D :D

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #109 on: November 02, 2015, 10:53:31 PM »
I've visited a lot of state capitols but I don't think I've ever been in the one in my state of birth.  Your narrative and photos make me think maybe we should go there the next time we're in the vicinity.  I'm not sure I've ever been to Harrisburg either!  But then I haven't lived in Pa. since high school.

ArdraF

Where were you born?  I really think Harrisburg rates up there with Mt. Rushmore as a work of art.  And, they did it without it appearing gaudy anywhere.  So tastefully done!  Just exquisite! 

We were going to do Santa Fe on this trip, too, but considering its 7200 feet of elevation, we are thinking we might want to save it and do it when we go to Texas next spring.  I'm a little afraid of running into snow and super cold weather.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

Dean & Linda Stock

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #110 on: November 13, 2015, 04:54:30 PM »
I hope to do more postings, but we are heading home (California) in travel mode (400+ miles/day).  We want to be in Phoenix to visit my best friend, who is undergoing IV antibiotic treatment for Lyme disease.  Her good days are Monday & Tuesday, and then she goes downhill from there.  It's kind of like chemo.

But, I wanted to share with RVForumers some information you might find helpful.

1) The FMCA RV park in Cincinnati is great for visiting Cincinnati.  It has concrete, smooth roads and pads with grass separating sites, which are spacious.  Everything is pristine, with wonderful full hook-ups, but no recreation, pool, etc.  And, it is free!

2) Topeka is a classy city!  The Deer Creek Valley RV Park also has great concrete, smooth roads and pads with grass separating sites, which are well-spaced.  They are wonderfully organized, and the hosts are great.  $40/night

3) Right next to the above RV park is the world's best BBQ--Lonnie Q's BBQ.  It's only open from 11-1, Monday through Friday, and from 5:30-7:30 Friday night.  Closed weekends.  Dean and I have our own smoker and seek out BBQ restaurants, and we've never had better BBQ.  We delayed our sightseeing on 3 days to be able to have brunch at Lonnie's.  There are only 7 items on the menu, but they are all outstanding.  Dean and I split one meal and leave full.

4) If you are visiting St. Louis, MO, the St. Louis RV Park is in the inner city, bounded by MLK Blvd. and a huge police station.  We felt secure.  The park is old, but had good hook-ups.  Spaces are close together, but they give you two spaces, one for your coach and one for your toad.  We would stay there again,  The hosts are conscientious and trying to please.  There were no other reasonable choices.
Dean and Linda Stock
and Sherlock (the cat)
Cypress, CA
2006 Airstream Motor Home
2006 Jeep Liberty (Towed)

ArdraF

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Re: Travel w/the Stocks to SD, ND, IA, NY and New England
« Reply #111 on: November 13, 2015, 05:08:05 PM »
Quote
Where were you born?

The York Pa. Hospital.  I was supposed to have been born at Walter Reed but, the Army being what it is, plans changed and we happened to be in York when the event took place!  About 20 years ago Mother showed Jerry and me the exact room from across the street.  We were amazed she even knew where the room was.

Lyme disease can be pretty devastating.  I wish your friend the best and it's good you can visit her en route.  Have a safe trip home.

ArdraF
ArdraF
:D :D

 

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