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Author Topic: Roof repair  (Read 1970 times)

danwelch

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Roof repair
« on: September 29, 2015, 07:46:30 PM »
Our pop up has a bit of a sag near the AC unit which is causing water to pool and leak into the roof. So I am looking for solutions short of replacing the entire roof.   flatroofsolutions.com sells a white on black EPDM rubber membrane roofing specifically for this application. I would have to build up the area around the AC unit somewhat and then apply the membrane across the entire roof. Does anyone know anything about this company or this technology? Or should we be looking at other options? Do you have any ideas on what might be good ways to build up the are around the AC unit?  I can't find anyone around our area (North Carolina) who does roof replacement, so this seems like the next option. Thanks all!

DearMissMermaid

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    • DearMissMermaid.Com
Re: Roof repair
« Reply #1 on: September 29, 2015, 08:01:14 PM »
I repaired my entire roof with Eternabond White roof seal repair tape. It comes on a roll like tape in various widths. You cut to size, then peel off the plastic protecting the glue,  then tape it down. You only get ONE chance to stick it down, the glue is super aggressive. The instructions explain how to fix minor goofs in taping. You can overlap the tape to build up the section of roof around the AC. We did the same thing on my Class C motorhome. I am leak free and the AC has better drainage.

I brought mine from Amazon, so much cheaper than the camper stores, here is the link to Eternabond White Roof Tape:
http://amzn.to/1FCh6w8
http://DearMissMermaid.Com

Living, working. playing  in a Class C, 1994 Tioga Montara, 28'

Pack half the stuff and twice the cash.
http://dearmissmermaid.blogspot.com/

WILDEBILL308

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Re: Roof repair
« Reply #2 on: September 29, 2015, 08:25:03 PM »
Well there are several ways to fix the leaking problem. What Dear Miss Mermaid said is an exultant suggestion.
Hear is another, Dicor Self-leveling Lap Sealant. Tape the area off with a couple layers of masking tape and it will stop the leak.
The real fix is to find out why it is sagging and repair the root problem. But until then either of these should stop it from leaking.
Bill
2003 Bounder 38N
300 HP 5.9 Cummins
Allison 3000MH Trans.
Towing 2014 Honda CRV
Home base Fort Worth, Texas
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn in no other way.
-Mark Twain-

danwelch

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Re: Roof repair
« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2015, 06:17:25 AM »
Wildebille - I was planning on going with the Eternabond - except for one detail.  My plan was to build up the roof around the gasket with several successive layers of the tape, lapping it up against the gasket to get it to seal there.  However, it strikes me that if I place the tape against the new gasket, the seal to the gasket will be compromised as soon as I tighten the AC unit down and the gasket compresses.  (The same problem would occur if I do this with Dicor.)  I can't do this AFTER I compress the gasket because there is no access to it - the compressor and condenser pan hang about a half inch above the roof surface and I don't have access.  I thought about applying the Eternabond or Dicor directly on the roof and laying the new gasket ATOP the built up surface, but I'm not sure if it will give a good, even surface for the gasket to seal against. And if it doesn't seal, it will tough to get the new material (Eternabond or Dicor) cleaned off and get it back to where it was.  Thoughts anyone?

driftless shifter

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Re: Roof repair
« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2015, 09:54:35 AM »
This is nothing more than clever low budget hack advice or redneck engineering. 8)
 Use two gaskets, glue them together and install as you would a single gasket. You may have to get two longer bolts for diagonally opposite corners, to reach all the way through to the inside. Tighten those two enough to get the original bolts started on the other corners, then remove the long bolts and replace with original length bolts and tighten down accordingly. This is a last ditch method in auto repair for slightly warped parts when the budget is tight and they just won't seal, but aren't under any real stress. Wouldn't work long on a head gasket but might last a lifetime on an exhaust manifold. I have also seen 2 angle irons laid across the roof from one side to the other used to pull a bellied center back up with through bolts in the center. Use big fender washers on the interior ceiling and use lots of sealant on the through bolts.

Bill
Bill & Nan
(o\_!_/o)
93 bounder 34, chevy chassis
couple of aircooled vw's, 1 fast(sold), 1 reliable(sold).  Dubless : (
USN '76-'80, 1 boat, USS Blandy, DD 943.
I'm an analog guy in a digital age.

tc tom

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Re: Roof repair
« Reply #5 on: October 03, 2015, 09:13:42 PM »
What I have done in the past was to remove the AC and build a curb around the AC opening on the roof. I could then flash/seal/roof up the curb. Then remount the AC on top of the curb. Any standing water lays against the curb and not at the AC gasket level. After all these years I can't believe the manufactures are still building them without a curb. Its a standard roofing application on flat roofs.

Good luck with your repair. Tom

danwelch

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Re: Roof repair
« Reply #6 on: October 03, 2015, 10:52:53 PM »
Tom - What did you build up the curb with?  I have a thin filon "sandwich" roof so I can't readily raise the roof material above the substructure.  I think I would have to build it up on top of the filon.  I agree with you that they ought to be built by the mfrs. with a curb.  I go up on a lot of commercial and industrial roofs.  They would never think about sealing major penetrations with just a gasket on a flat roof.

danwelch

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Re: Roof repair
« Reply #7 on: October 03, 2015, 10:59:42 PM »
Driftless - I am thinking about re-using the existing gasket and stacking it on top of the new gasket.  The original gasket was not adhered to the filon roof.  (Perhaps they put the sticky side against the AC unit rather than down on the roof?)  In any case it is in pretty good shape - but it wasn't even close to being snugged down.  I can't see a downside to stacking this on top of the new gasket.  I guess I'll have to prop the other end of the AC unit with foam (where the compressor and condenser are) so that it doesn't bounce while on the road adding even more stress to the roof.

tc tom

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Re: Roof repair
« Reply #8 on: October 06, 2015, 07:56:22 PM »
I cut down a piece of dry pressure treated wood 1 inch high and just a little bet wider than the AC gasket. I don't remember exactly, as it's been a long time ago. I think I made it 1 '' x 1''. I caulked and screwed it to the roof being careful not to over tighten the screws. You could even c clamp it through the AC roof opening.
All you need to do is to get the caulk to set so the curb isn't moving around while you water proofing it to the roof. And also hold it in place when installing the AC.

Hope this helps,

Tom

danwelch

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Re: Roof repair
« Reply #9 on: October 07, 2015, 06:59:07 AM »
Thanks Tom.  I may try this "next" after I try some interior roof supports and a new gasket.  I have some box tube and L-brackets that I will be installing from the inside with the intention of raising the center of the roof a half inch or so.  (Actually, just removing the sag...)  Then I will reattach the AC with a new gasket and flood it with the hose.  Should know in a couple days if this works,.  If not, on to plan B! 

Dan

Perusser

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Re: Roof repair
« Reply #10 on: November 15, 2015, 12:30:20 PM »
Thanks Tom.  I may try this "next" after I try some interior roof supports and a new gasket.  I have some box tube and L-brackets that I will be installing from the inside with the intention of raising the center of the roof a half inch or so.  (Actually, just removing the sag...)  Then I will reattach the AC with a new gasket and flood it with the hose.  Should know in a couple days if this works,.  If not, on to plan B! 

Dan

Dan,

New to the forum here so I'll introduce myself. Name is David and I am in the process of rebuilding my roof on my 2004 Rockwood due to damage from water around the AC unit. Stripped the roof and first order of business is to brace the interior roof, you indicated you are using box tube. Mind if I ask where you got it,size etc. Also, did you plan on bending the box tube for a bit of curvature for water displacement?

Thank you,

David G.

danwelch

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Re: Roof repair
« Reply #11 on: November 15, 2015, 02:34:36 PM »
I used 1" box tube.  It is steel (not aluminum) and they had two different wall gauges - I got the heavier duty material.  It came in 20' lengths from Dillon Supply - a local provider of metals here in NC.  It cost me about $20I'm sure there is somewhere nearby that sells structural steel materials where you are.  I did not bend it but attached it with angle iron to the underside of the roof.  I chose angle irons that fit right inside the box tube and irons I through bolted the angle irons with stainless steel screws to the side rails.  I didn't bolt the angle iron to the box tube - they are "captured" by the box tube - so there were no penetrations through the roof.  I jacked up the roof a bit (about and inch and a half) before I drilled the holes for the angle irons.  It definitely took the sag out of the roof.  With a new AC gasket - so far so good. 

Good luck with your roof repair!
Dan

 

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