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Author Topic: Automotive OBD2 question  (Read 4809 times)

denmarc

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Automotive OBD2 question
« on: January 02, 2016, 12:09:45 PM »
Knowing that OBD systems can be a PITA, I hope this simple question is a no brainer. The battery in the DW's 2011 Honda CR-V is starting to show signs of fatigue with the weather getting cold. I don't like playing games. I will be replacing the battery. Here is my question...

Do I really need to purchase a memory saver? Any reason why I just can't hook up an external battery via jumper cables to the auto's cable terminals before removing the battery? Therefore, retaining the computer and radio memories?

Am I missing something that makes my question sound too easy?
« Last Edit: January 02, 2016, 12:42:37 PM by denmarc »
Mark

1994 Jayco Eagle 370FB on 24 acres of paid off paradise in Michigan.

You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose.
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William52

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Re: Automotive OBD2 question
« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2016, 12:43:50 PM »
Some jump boxes have cigarette plug adapter use that. If you don't have one you can make one out of a old 12v cig. plug in the 12v power in the dash its safer. Just make sure every thing is off. And be careful with the pos. batt. terminal wrap a rag over it will be hot!
« Last Edit: January 02, 2016, 12:46:30 PM by William52 »
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Rene T

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Re: Automotive OBD2 question
« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2016, 12:50:23 PM »
Do I really need to purchase a memory saver? Any reason why I just can't hook up an external battery via jumper cables to the auto's cable terminals before removing the battery? Therefore, retaining the computer and radio memories?

Sounds simple enough to do if it was done with 2 people.  One person holding the cables in the air and the other swapping out the batteries.
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Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: Automotive OBD2 question
« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2016, 01:02:46 PM »
Is it a big concern? A few radio presets and maybe a day while the computers re-learn your driving habits? It's not like it goes belly up when the engine & body computers reset.
Gary
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denmarc

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Re: Automotive OBD2 question
« Reply #4 on: January 02, 2016, 01:13:44 PM »
You are both on the same page as I. I just couldn't figure that it could be that easy with proper care. Thought maybe there was something I overlooked that would make my idea the wrong thing to do.

Gary, I understand that it's not like the Honda will blow up or shut down. However, I am also to understand that the computers takes longer than a day or two to accommodate ones driving habits. Not that a few more days would make that much of a difference under warmer circumstances. My concern is ease of retaining the memory with such an easy solution without any additional purchase.

In other words, is a memory saver necessary?
Mark

1994 Jayco Eagle 370FB on 24 acres of paid off paradise in Michigan.

You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose.
Dr. Seuss

William52

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Re: Automotive OBD2 question
« Reply #5 on: January 02, 2016, 01:20:17 PM »
Its a Honda better have radio code handy. You will need it if power to it goes dead.
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denmarc

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Re: Automotive OBD2 question
« Reply #6 on: January 02, 2016, 01:24:59 PM »
Its a Honda better have radio code handy. You will need it if power to it goes dead.

The root of my question.

Gary, BTW...
If my DW doesn't have her radio tuned to her stations after battery replacement, she will hunt you down!   >:(
Mark

1994 Jayco Eagle 370FB on 24 acres of paid off paradise in Michigan.

You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose.
Dr. Seuss

Stephen S.

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Re: Automotive OBD2 question
« Reply #7 on: January 02, 2016, 03:08:12 PM »
Wow!

Google "auto memory saver" and choose shopping.

They have pigtails that plug into the cigarette socket and a 9V battery for under $10. And cables that plug into the OBD port and the 12V outlet of a "JumpStart" type battery pack.

I guess anything that keeps some volts available to the electronics will keep them from resetting to factory default.

Manual for my VW lays out a series of maneuvers that have to be completed for the on-board computer to get back to efficient driving settings after disconnecting the battery. Things like X number of stop and go, then a certain distance at 45mph or more continuous, then some hard acceleration. Basically it will get through the check list in a few days normal driving.
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Saab guy

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Re: Automotive OBD2 question
« Reply #8 on: January 02, 2016, 03:43:30 PM »
Hello you can use a spare battery and jumper cables, or make sure you have radio code and write down radio settings and put them in after you change battery if something goes wrong with changing battery. A Honda will run fine if you change out the battery with no battery minder. If you do not know the radio code call Honda dealer parts dept they can tell you which buttons to push to tell you the code. If you Ned more help PM me And I will explain or get code for you. I will be in my shop on Monday

Bill

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Re: Automotive OBD2 question
« Reply #9 on: January 02, 2016, 04:45:57 PM »
Let me put it this way.. So long as you do not slip and short something out.. YOUR PLAN IS GOOD.

It will work just fine..

Page2   You can get a Jump Start pack at most auto places. This is a plastic case with a short pair of cables and battery clamps. it has an AGM battery inside, usually in the 20-30 amp hour range but the better ones will jump start most anything. 

I have used several of these over the last 20 or 30 years.  750 amps (Peak amp reating) is good for jump starting cars and light trucks, Might do a gas motor home, WIll do the generator on same.

Smaller ones can do what you need, plus run a portable work light or fan and likely start the generator. 

In short.. VERY HANDY DEVICES.
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Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: Automotive OBD2 question
« Reply #10 on: January 02, 2016, 04:57:39 PM »
If the radio presets are that important to Mama, then you had better save them. A memory saver cable device is only about $10 on Amazon, but anywhere from $15-$50 at local auto parts stores. No difference in them as far as I can see. Heck, you could make one with a 12v plug and some clip leads.

FWIW: Did your car run poorly when you drove it home from the dealer? It didn't know your driving style then either.
Gary
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oldme

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Re: Automotive OBD2 question
« Reply #11 on: January 02, 2016, 07:31:10 PM »
When our was replaced in the CRV I just replaced it normally.
No memory Saver needed. A waste of money.
Reset any missing radio station and a 10 min drive had all the other items set.

William52

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Re: Automotive OBD2 question
« Reply #12 on: January 02, 2016, 08:52:51 PM »
You are both on the same page as I. I just couldn't figure that it could be that easy with proper care. Thought maybe there was something I overlooked that would make my idea the wrong thing to do.

Gary, I understand that it's not like the Honda will blow up or shut down. However, I am also to understand that the computers takes longer than a day or two to accommodate ones driving habits. Not that a few more days would make that much of a difference under warmer circumstances. My concern is ease of retaining the memory with such an easy solution without any additional purchase.

In other words, is a memory saver necessary?

No not really some cars are worst than others Honda radio code is not a problem as long as you have it. May need to relearn windows/sunroof that's abt.it. Others seats,mirrors can be PITA The 9v batt sometimes don,t  work and never load it(open a door) Zap!

Edit: fixed quotes   -scottydl
« Last Edit: January 12, 2016, 10:29:09 AM by scottydl »
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denmarc

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Re: Automotive OBD2 question
« Reply #13 on: January 03, 2016, 06:36:57 AM »
It appears the general consensus is what I was thinking. I'm going to get a new battery today and give it a try. I see absolutely no reason why a spare battery and some jumpers wouldn't work. The spare battery is in my garage and the jumpers are in the back of my truck. What the heck! No additional cost over the new battery with the same results. If all goes well.

Will let you all know how it goes. Thanks for the replies.
Mark

1994 Jayco Eagle 370FB on 24 acres of paid off paradise in Michigan.

You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose.
Dr. Seuss

8Muddypaws

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Re: Automotive OBD2 question
« Reply #14 on: January 03, 2016, 07:12:14 AM »
Is it a big concern? A few radio presets and maybe a day while the computers re-learn your driving habits? It's not like it goes belly up when the engine & body computers reset.

That's not the only issue.  The radios have an anti theft code that has to be entered after a power loss.  If you don't have the code handy it's a complete PITA to find it.  In some cases it requires removal of the radio to get serial numbers, then calling Honda, and maybe a service charge.

When I change batteries I use jumper cables.  Other unexpected things can happen too.  I learned that the hard way when my F250 locked the doors (with the keys inside) when I removed both batteries.
« Last Edit: January 03, 2016, 07:17:45 AM by 8Muddypaws »
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William52

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Re: Automotive OBD2 question
« Reply #15 on: January 03, 2016, 08:13:51 AM »
It appears the general consensus is what I was thinking. I'm going to get a new battery today and give it a try. I see absolutely no reason why a spare battery and some jumpers wouldn't work. The spare battery is in my garage and the jumpers are in the back of my truck. What the heck! No additional cost over the new battery with the same results. If all goes well.

Will let you all know how it goes. Thanks for the replies.
Marc just get 12v some way on the car thur cig/12v plug when changing batts. Radio code on door on lower glove box.
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denmarc

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Re: Automotive OBD2 question
« Reply #16 on: January 03, 2016, 02:48:59 PM »
Radio code on door on lower glove box.

Here is the update:

William52 and my DW got the job done. Installed the new battery using the external battery and jumper cable scenario. Found that I had to think steps ahead before removing any cables. Wanted to be sure jumpers would not impede removal of battery shroud and battery before removing terminals.
After installing the new battery, jumped in the car and turned on the key to start. Guess what?...
Radio needed the damn code!
I started to spew many words not mentionable here! Thinking I screwed things up, I cowered and asked the DW if she remembered where the dealership got the code off the vehicle a few years back.
Boy, did I get an earfull! Reluctantly, she went out to the garage with me. I followed like a whipped puppy. With her memory and William52s mention, we found the code to unlock the radio. All presets were still intact.

All is well now. Not sure if the external battery and jumper cable idea was a good one or not. Everything else on the car that is preset is the same. Seems like the radio is just super sensitive to any change in input voltage. Just my guess.

Thanks to everyone. If nothing else, it was an experience that may help someone.
Mark

1994 Jayco Eagle 370FB on 24 acres of paid off paradise in Michigan.

You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose.
Dr. Seuss

Lou Schneider

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Re: Automotive OBD2 question
« Reply #17 on: January 03, 2016, 03:14:00 PM »
Wow.  All this nonsense is making me happier and happier with my pre-2000 car.

denmarc

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Re: Automotive OBD2 question
« Reply #18 on: January 03, 2016, 04:18:43 PM »
Wow.  All this nonsense is making me happier and happier with my pre-2000 car.

You're not kidding, Lou! I was going to look for something a bit newer to replace my '98 Dodge pickup come Spring.

Getting to the point where you need to have an engineering degree in auto technology just to change the oil.
Mark

1994 Jayco Eagle 370FB on 24 acres of paid off paradise in Michigan.

You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose.
Dr. Seuss

William52

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Re: Automotive OBD2 question
« Reply #19 on: January 03, 2016, 09:38:51 PM »
Here is the update:

William52 and my DW got the job done. Installed the new battery using the external battery and jumper cable scenario. Found that I had to think steps ahead before removing any cables. Wanted to be sure jumpers would not impede removal of battery shroud and battery before removing terminals.
After installing the new battery, jumped in the car and turned on the key to start. Guess what?...
Radio needed the damn code!
I started to spew many words not mentionable here! Thinking I screwed things up, I cowered and asked the DW if she remembered where the dealership got the code off the vehicle a few years back.
Boy, did I get an earfull! Reluctantly, she went out to the garage with me. I followed like a whipped puppy. With her memory and William52s mention, we found the code to unlock the radio. All presets were still intact.

All is well now. Not sure if the external battery and jumper cable idea was a good one or not. Everything else on the car that is preset is the same. Seems like the radio is just super sensitive to any change in input voltage. Just my guess.

Thanks to everyone. If nothing else, it was an experience that may help someone.
   You should be glad you don't drive a BMW! Can be worst...Code was there? Some dealers put them elsewhere?
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8Muddypaws

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Re: Automotive OBD2 question
« Reply #20 on: January 03, 2016, 09:46:22 PM »
In the case of Hondas it's up to the selling dealership to put the code on the inside of the glove box hinge.  Most of them don't.  We lost power in Arizona a couple of years ago and didn't find the code until we got home 3 weeks later.

it has a nav system and that may have made it harder.
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William52

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Re: Automotive OBD2 question
« Reply #21 on: January 03, 2016, 10:03:42 PM »
DW been driving Honda for years. 2010 CRV exl FYI Honda has the code, But you may need to show them proof of ownership Title or registration at parts they don't like people who steal radios. Esp. NAV. NO RADIO REMOVAL REQ. JS
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denmarc

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Re: Automotive OBD2 question
« Reply #22 on: January 04, 2016, 09:41:27 AM »
In the case of Hondas it's up to the selling dealership to put the code on the inside of the glove box hinge.  Most of them don't.

it has a nav system and that may have made it harder.

That fact may have been my saving grace. This car has all the bells and whistles also. Luckily, it was a lease turn in at the same Honda dealership we bought it from. I guess that dealership puts that little sticker where it's suppose to be. This one was on the outside of the open glove box on the left side. It kept me out of the doghouse!

Beside being an interesting little experiment, I just wondered if my idea was possible and/or practical. The tongue lashing I got from the DW was really the least of my worries. She drives considerably further back and forth to work than I do. I don't want to worry about her because of something I did. She sent me a text when she got to work this morning. Everything is good.  :)

Again, thanks to all.
Mark

1994 Jayco Eagle 370FB on 24 acres of paid off paradise in Michigan.

You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose.
Dr. Seuss

Molaker

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Re: Automotive OBD2 question
« Reply #23 on: January 04, 2016, 03:50:00 PM »
It appears the general consensus is what I was thinking. I'm going to get a new battery today and give it a try. I see absolutely no reason why a spare battery and some jumpers wouldn't work. The spare battery is in my garage and the jumpers are in the back of my truck. What the heck! No additional cost over the new battery with the same results. If all goes well.

Will let you all know how it goes. Thanks for the replies.
You don'the need a "spare" battery.  The old battery can be used.  If it is too run down, the codes are flushed already.
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mistere

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Re: Automotive OBD2 question
« Reply #24 on: January 05, 2016, 07:40:26 PM »
Have you had the existing battery load tested?  Generally OEM batteries are high quality, usually lasting a lot more than five years.
Ed
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