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Author Topic: Any experience with Capri TCs?  (Read 1016 times)

MA

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  • Posts: 37
Any experience with Capri TCs?
« on: February 03, 2016, 03:15:56 PM »
Now looking at Capri. I don't mind the lack of fancy, but the possibility of mold bothers me. I read somewhere that these are so poorly sealed that they are going to mold right away. Since I'm deathly allergic to mold, I just can't have that.
Anybody have a recent one of these, and can relate whether they have had leak problems? For most people mold is a cosmetic issue but for me it is life threatening.

And/or is there a *reliable* way I can *really* seal this sucker up so that I have no worries?

tc tom

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  • Posts: 168
Re: Any experience with Capri TCs?
« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2016, 07:59:18 PM »
Hello,

My wife was the same way. the best solution for us was a camper with no wood. How ever you cut it wood + water in a camper will usually = mold. You might look at some of the aluminum framed campers like Livin Lite.
We went with aluminum skin, frame and inside wall covering. The only wood we have are the cabinet face frames and doors.

Good luck, Tom

MA

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  • Posts: 37
Re: Any experience with Capri TCs?
« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2016, 10:12:00 PM »
Thanks. I have a Camplite travel trailer that I lived in, safely, for three years. However I want a slide-in and my truck cannot handle the weigh of the Camplite TCs. I did not know that they were so heavy when I bought the truck, and it is too late to un-buy the truck.

tc tom

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  • Posts: 168
Re: Any experience with Capri TCs?
« Reply #3 on: February 14, 2016, 08:48:32 PM »
Hello MA,

If I had a new Capri this is what I would do. My Used Capri had bare plywood for floor and the sides of the box. I Assume the new ones are the same. I would thoroughly water proof all the bare plywood inside and out. I would not trust any of the sealant used on windows, doors or exterior moldings if it is the tape type caulk. The most common source of leaks are around the moldings, windows and doors. Yes, what I'm saying is I would remove tall the above and bed them back in place with a good polymer caulk like Dap Sidewinder. Do not use a latex based caulk as it will wash out. I would also fill any screw holes. If you have the type of molding that has the vinyl strip in it to cover the screws, the strip is not water proof. Water gets trapped in that space and in time will work it's way down the screw holes and into the wood. The roof is next. Check any thing coming through the roof. If they have used the self leveling type caulk, that is pretty good stuff. But inspect it all to make sure every edge is well sealed and inspect it often. If you have a roof air conditioner, I would remove the inside trim so you can see up where the seal is. Have someone use a hose on high pressure on the roof around the base and look for leaks inside. Depending on the roof framing, the AC can cause the roof to sage with time and water will pool around the AC. I would inspect the AC bolts that hold the unit to the roof periotticly to be sure they have the right torque to keep the seal compressed. Roof AC's are the fist thing I get rid of and install window type in the wall.I would also caulk the inside of the box where the walls meet the floor. Caulk any place water could get to wood. Paranoid, nah. Bought a use TT 7 years old. It was headed for salvage because of water damaged. My used Capri was 6 years old and rotted way beyond repair. As an example I was able to pull the all screws holding the jacks on out with a pair of pliers. Hope this is not over whelming, just trying to honestly answer your question. Good luck, Tom.

 

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