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Author Topic: Boondocking/working online/electrical system design help needed  (Read 3484 times)

Frankedj

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Boondocking/working online/electrical system design help needed
« on: February 22, 2016, 05:37:08 PM »
I have never worked with these types of parts for solar/controller/charger/invertor/generator. I am completely lost.

I need to design an electrical system for fulltiming which will be 75% boondocking. My work is partially done online on and off all day every day. I have started making up a list of what I want to have and approximate usage in a day.

It will be for a used 25’-35’ Class C with center bed in the back. I plan batteries under the bed. Definitely want remote monitoring of everything. I am also considering additional banks of batteries to the front as I will be building a desk and couch myself. It would be easy to design things around the batteries.

The electrical will probably cost more than the rig but the electric is something that I must always have at any time when I need it.

To start off with I want to do solar and possibly add in wind down the road. The batteries I have been looking at are 12v deep cycle 100ah. The size and weight(75lbs-86lbs) is something that I am comfortable handling. I would like to go with high output solar panels to get as much out of a small roof as I can. I am not opposed to having multiple systems.

The full blown desktop computer is currently at 650w but I am replacing the PSU with a 400w unit and removing the power hungry graphics card, using onboard graphics instead. I build my computers so it isn’t something that I would give up on easily. Everything I watch on TV is through my computer.
Not sure what sound bars draw but I typically listen to music on youtube up to 20 hours a day, usually through my computer but with a sound bar I can connect the phone to it with Bluetooth and not need to have the computer on for music.

I added in a small TV so that I won’t always have to use the big one. Both will be used for the computer. One or the other, not both at the same time.

I would prefer to get as much out of solar as I can while relying on a generator less often.

Desktop computer = 400w 6-8 hrs per day
48” Flat Screen = up to 100w 6-8 hrs per day
24” Flat Screen = up to 40w 2 hrs per day
PS4 = up to 150w 2-3 hours per day
Coffee = 1450w 90 seconds x 6 times per day
Sound bar

All of the interior lighting will be converted to 12v LED and down the road I plan on adding a bunch of decorative 5v & 12v LED & EL Wire but the loads for the decorative lighting can be on a later system as they are not essential.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
1988 HR Imperial 33'
700 watts Renogy Mono solar panels
Tri-Star 60A PWM Solar Controller
Magnum MS2012-15B Pure Sine Inv.
Wireless remote solar tilt
TM-2030RV-F TriMetric Battery Monitor
Six Crown 6CRV220 AGM batteries with 4/0 cables
1,000+ watt 14 cabinet tri-amped sound system w/30 band EQ

kdbgoat

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Re: Boondocking/working online/electrical system design help needed
« Reply #1 on: February 22, 2016, 06:21:05 PM »
Two folks to look up online are Jack Mayer and Handy Bob. There is a wealth of information between the two of them.
A word of warning-putting the batteries under may not be the best idea. They need to be in an area that is vented to the outside.
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Frankedj

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Re: Boondocking/working online/electrical system design help needed
« Reply #2 on: February 22, 2016, 09:24:03 PM »
Thanks for the info. I am getting a lot from Handy Bob. I really like the way he tells it like it is.
1988 HR Imperial 33'
700 watts Renogy Mono solar panels
Tri-Star 60A PWM Solar Controller
Magnum MS2012-15B Pure Sine Inv.
Wireless remote solar tilt
TM-2030RV-F TriMetric Battery Monitor
Six Crown 6CRV220 AGM batteries with 4/0 cables
1,000+ watt 14 cabinet tri-amped sound system w/30 band EQ

Lou Schneider

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Re: Boondocking/working online/electrical system design help needed
« Reply #3 on: February 23, 2016, 02:55:51 AM »
That computer system is the real killer - between it and the big screen monitor you're looking at 4000 watt-hours per day.

Multiply the wattage by the number of hours each item is on each day to get the number of watt-hours it will use.

Divide that by 12 to determine how many amp-hours it will draw from a 12 volt battery.  Actually, divide by 10 to allow for inverter losses.

That's 400 amp-hours you'll have to store or generate every day just to run the computer.

The rest of your uses add another 1150 watt-hours, or 115 amp-hours to your total.   Interesting enough, the coffeemaker is the second smallest user since it's on for such a short period of time.

With 6-8 hours of average full solar insolation per day, you're looking at 650 - 800 watts of solar panels to replace your usage.

To store a full day's worth of power (in case of a cloudy day) you'll need (11) 100 amp-hour 12 volt batteries, since you can only draw a lead acid battery down by 50% (50 a-h per battery) without causing damage.  6 batteries will give you a half day's storage and is probably a good match given the solar input.

These are rough estimates, you can balance more solar vs. fewer batteries vs. supplementing with generator power if you want.

But I'd give serious thought about reducing your computer footprint since it's 4/5 of your total consumption.
« Last Edit: February 23, 2016, 03:04:38 AM by Lou Schneider »

Ernie n Tara

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Re: Boondocking/working online/electrical system design help needed
« Reply #4 on: February 23, 2016, 09:36:02 AM »
You also need to think seriously about weight.  Class C's in that size range are notorious for having low capacity for added weight. Just the batteries could easily add 600 to 700 lb. I expect you should consider a larger class A (likely  diesel), rather than a C. Another alternate would be using a trailer, but that presents other problems.

Ernie
Ernie 'n Tara

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garyb1st

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Re: Boondocking/working online/electrical system design help needed
« Reply #5 on: February 23, 2016, 10:56:03 AM »
Batteries under the bed?  Is this safe? 
Gary B1st

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Molaker

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Re: Boondocking/working online/electrical system design help needed
« Reply #6 on: February 23, 2016, 11:05:39 AM »
Be aware it is common for a class C to have the fresh water tank under the bed.
Tom & Joyce and Ditto the "don't tell her she's a dog" Westie
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John Hilley

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Re: Boondocking/working online/electrical system design help needed
« Reply #7 on: February 23, 2016, 01:40:40 PM »
By putting on extra solar panels you can reduce the required battery capacity by using the excess solar to run your computer. You will probably have to make a rack that will allow you to put solar panels over some things on the roof. In a class C there isn't enough room to put the panels directly on the roof. have you actually measured the power used by the computer, although you have a 600 watt power supply, average consumption may be half of that. As mentioned, battery weight in a class C will be an issue, especially distribution of that weight. I think you would be better served with 6 volt golf cart batteries.
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Frankedj

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Re: Boondocking/working online/electrical system design help needed
« Reply #8 on: February 23, 2016, 02:33:26 PM »
By putting on extra solar panels you can reduce the required battery capacity by using the excess solar to run your computer. You will probably have to make a rack that will allow you to put solar panels over some things on the roof. In a class C there isn't enough room to put the panels directly on the roof. have you actually measured the power used by the computer, although you have a 600 watt power supply, average consumption may be half of that. As mentioned, battery weight in a class C will be an issue, especially distribution of that weight. I think you would be better served with 6 volt golf cart batteries.

A load meter will be the first thing I buy. Right now the PSU in the computer is 650w with a plan to take it down to a 400w PSU. After doing more thinking on it I can get it down even farther. I use 5 hard drives and can buy a high capacity drive to replace 4 of the old ones. The Solid State drive has to stay for my OS.

I have a huge full tower case with big fans and a lot of LED's. I can eliminate the biggest fans. This case was designed for hardcore gaming. I don't do anything like that so I don't need the huge fans or the lights.

I do overclock my CPU and it has a massive air cooler on it with a 120mm fan. There is another plain  140mm fan on the rear of the case so these two fans are all I need. I would be unhooking three 200mm fans.

Coming up with a mounting system flat or raised won't be an issue. I used to design and install special effect lighting systems for about 25 years. I can do some serious mounting. Like Overkill Bob, I'm Overkill Frank. Better to be safe than sorry.

Batteries in basement, 6ga straight down, controller close as possible to batteries. Battery meter. If under 600w PWM if over 600w MPPT to get the little boost early in charging. Fuses, fuses, fuses & disconnects. I have the perfect power distribution blocks for the combiner box on the roof.

Handy Bob has a lot of good info and it was very entertaining as well. I read most of it yesterday.
1988 HR Imperial 33'
700 watts Renogy Mono solar panels
Tri-Star 60A PWM Solar Controller
Magnum MS2012-15B Pure Sine Inv.
Wireless remote solar tilt
TM-2030RV-F TriMetric Battery Monitor
Six Crown 6CRV220 AGM batteries with 4/0 cables
1,000+ watt 14 cabinet tri-amped sound system w/30 band EQ

John From Detroit

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Re: Boondocking/working online/electrical system design help needed
« Reply #9 on: February 23, 2016, 02:52:35 PM »
One one of the other forums I visit there was a linke to "Can you operate an air conditioner on Solar"

900 amp hours of LiON batteries, 3,000 watt inverter, 900 Plus watts of solar, Bright sunny day, Small A/C.. They did it.

Ah, HIstory: Show all history, Search (AIR) can be useful....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B0rZY5uotKI

LiON batteries, as I recall are not as heavy per AH as Lead Acid.. Of course your wallet won't be as heavy after buying them either.

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Becks

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Re: Boondocking/working online/electrical system design help needed
« Reply #10 on: February 23, 2016, 03:30:40 PM »
As suggested, a Class A coach will give you more roof space for the amount of solar you will require. It will also give you more cargo capacity, as well as more weight carrying capacity.
2006 Travel Supreme
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Sun2Retire

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Re: Boondocking/working online/electrical system design help needed
« Reply #11 on: February 23, 2016, 03:59:57 PM »
I typically listen to music on youtube up to 20 hours a day

I plan batteries under the bed.

It sounds to me like you could just remove the bed altogether; then you'll have room for LOTS of batteries  ;)
Scott
2005 Newmar Dutch Star 3810, Spartan, Cat C7 350 "OURVEE"
Eezrv TPMS, VMSpc, 800W Solar
2002 Dodge RAM 1500 Quad Cab "RTOAD"
Stowmaster towbar & Brakemaster

Frankedj

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Re: Boondocking/working online/electrical system design help needed
« Reply #12 on: March 01, 2016, 10:02:57 AM »
The RV will be bought keeping the battery and solar panel locations in mind.

I'm an RV noob so I am learning it as I go. Been learning it for about a week now. Going with flooded so exhaust will be required. Either Trojan T-105 or T-125.

I have a general idea of the parts I need. I received my remote Kill A Watt yesterday to start taking actual power draw readings. The big TV was estimated at 100 watts. 67 watts is the actual draw. I am rounding it up to 70. I ordered a sound bar, coffee maker and 24" flat screen so I can get readings on the electronics I will be taking with me.

If I go over 600 watts I will use a MPPT controller. Under 600 watts I will use a PWM. 1 watt of solar per ah of battery. I won't get any controller that doesn't allow you to adjust the charging voltage.

The sound bar has bluetooth so I can have youtube playing on the phone with unlimited data and it will link to the sound bar. The sound bar manual states it has a 22 watt draw.

Music is a big part of my life. I was a nightclub DJ at 21 during the 80's. I am now 51. I spent decades designing, installing and programming special effect lighting and commercial sound systems. I am exchanging my home nightclub sound system for a sound bar in a RV. Currently 1,700 watts of sound vs sound bar with 60 watts. I also have the parts for a 3,600 watt system.
1988 HR Imperial 33'
700 watts Renogy Mono solar panels
Tri-Star 60A PWM Solar Controller
Magnum MS2012-15B Pure Sine Inv.
Wireless remote solar tilt
TM-2030RV-F TriMetric Battery Monitor
Six Crown 6CRV220 AGM batteries with 4/0 cables
1,000+ watt 14 cabinet tri-amped sound system w/30 band EQ

Sun2Retire

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Re: Boondocking/working online/electrical system design help needed
« Reply #13 on: March 01, 2016, 10:47:08 AM »
a 3,600 watt system.
Um, wow. Let us know which state you'll be boondocking in so we can avoid it ;)

Going with flooded so exhaust will be required. Either Trojan T-105 or T-125.
I currently have 125s and am planning on adding more batteries in the bin. Have abandoned the idea of flooded. Requires sealed, acid-proof box with redundant fans pressurizing box which then vents overboard. Then there's the access issue for routine battery maintenance. You're going to be spending seriously money on this project. I would suggest spending a small amount more and going with AGMs.
Scott
2005 Newmar Dutch Star 3810, Spartan, Cat C7 350 "OURVEE"
Eezrv TPMS, VMSpc, 800W Solar
2002 Dodge RAM 1500 Quad Cab "RTOAD"
Stowmaster towbar & Brakemaster

HueyPilotVN

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Re: Boondocking/working online/electrical system design help needed
« Reply #14 on: March 01, 2016, 11:03:37 AM »
Here is another possible thing to consider.

I went with a Blue Sky Controller system because it allows you to use thier IPN network to daisy chain controllers to add more capacity for up to a huge amount of solar.

I have 700 watts on the DP right now but can easily add more in increments of up to 40 amps each up to 7 controllers.  The master controller will manage the entire array and they have a monitor that tells you all the same information as the trimetric battery monitor.

You might want to read this post for more details.

http://www.rvforum.net/SMF_forum/index.php/topic,90672.msg828797.html#msg828797
Bill Waugh
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Kevin Means

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Re: Boondocking/working online/electrical system design help needed
« Reply #15 on: March 01, 2016, 11:11:30 AM »
A few questions Frank... is your goal with solar to completely replenish the amps drawn fron your battery-bank, or to partially replenish them? If partially, how much? How big (in amp hours) do you envision your battery-bank being? In what part of the country do you plan on doing most of your boondocking?

Kev
2011 Winnebago Tour 42QD
Towing a Jeep Rubicon Unlimited LJ or an Acura MDX
RVI Brake 2, Minder TM-66 TPMS, 970 watts of solar
(Can't wait to spend more time RVing)
Lakeside, California

Frankedj

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Re: Boondocking/working online/electrical system design help needed
« Reply #16 on: March 01, 2016, 11:29:06 AM »
Here is another possible thing to consider.

I went with a Blue Sky Controller system because it allows you to use thier IPN network to daisy chain controllers to add more capacity for up to a huge amount of solar.

I have looked at that brand. I am looking at the TriStar TS-MPPT-60 Charge Controller for a bigger system. Same one for PWM if I go smaller. They can be networked.
1988 HR Imperial 33'
700 watts Renogy Mono solar panels
Tri-Star 60A PWM Solar Controller
Magnum MS2012-15B Pure Sine Inv.
Wireless remote solar tilt
TM-2030RV-F TriMetric Battery Monitor
Six Crown 6CRV220 AGM batteries with 4/0 cables
1,000+ watt 14 cabinet tri-amped sound system w/30 band EQ

Frankedj

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Re: Boondocking/working online/electrical system design help needed
« Reply #17 on: March 01, 2016, 11:38:44 AM »
A few questions Frank... is your goal with solar to completely replenish the amps drawn fron your battery-bank, or to partially replenish them? If partially, how much? How big (in amp hours) do you envision your battery-bank being? In what part of the country do you plan on doing most of your boondocking?

Kev

I want the majority to be solar with a gen backup because the sun does not always shine. My first calcs for ah was 333. Discharging to 50% made it 666. Six T-105 would be 675ah. Once I get the other electronics I will be taking I can figure things up with the actual wattages.

I really won't know about the PV panels until I have an RV and can figure out how much I can fit on it. I have a long history of rigging tens of thousands of pounds of equipment from vibrating surfaces.

I will probably end up following the seasons while avoiding the cold. Find a temp I like and ride that. I do want to drive the edge of the country all the way around just because.
1988 HR Imperial 33'
700 watts Renogy Mono solar panels
Tri-Star 60A PWM Solar Controller
Magnum MS2012-15B Pure Sine Inv.
Wireless remote solar tilt
TM-2030RV-F TriMetric Battery Monitor
Six Crown 6CRV220 AGM batteries with 4/0 cables
1,000+ watt 14 cabinet tri-amped sound system w/30 band EQ

Frankedj

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Re: Boondocking/working online/electrical system design help needed
« Reply #18 on: March 03, 2016, 08:54:40 AM »
After taking power usage readings on some of the things I will be taking I have discovered that I don't need a big system. The wireless Kill A Watt is great. The computer has a 650 watt PSU but only uses 150 watts with an occasional 180 watt peak. It stays between 110 & 150.

I started out with the frame of mind that I need big, need more. It is what I am used to doing in my previous lines of work. Build it bigger, make it stronger, make it huge.

Things are now down to four T-105 batteries and under 600ah so I can go smaller. Less wattage in PV panels, smaller/cheaper solar controller. With the amount of money saved with the downscale of things I can move the money over to AGM batteries.

I have been lightly reading over flooded battery maintenance. Looks like the added expense of AGM will make it worth it. I still have much more reading to do on the subject.

I am still waiting to receive the coffee maker and a new small flat screen to get actual readings on them to have my final numbers.

I am currently at needing 392ah on 450ah of batteries.
1988 HR Imperial 33'
700 watts Renogy Mono solar panels
Tri-Star 60A PWM Solar Controller
Magnum MS2012-15B Pure Sine Inv.
Wireless remote solar tilt
TM-2030RV-F TriMetric Battery Monitor
Six Crown 6CRV220 AGM batteries with 4/0 cables
1,000+ watt 14 cabinet tri-amped sound system w/30 band EQ

Sun2Retire

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Re: Boondocking/working online/electrical system design help needed
« Reply #19 on: March 03, 2016, 09:20:38 AM »
Things are now down to four T-105 batteries and under 600ah so I can go smaller.  With the amount of money saved with the downscale of things I can move the money over to AGM batteries.
Just as an FYI, Trojan has recalled their 105 AGMs and suspended production due to failures in the case; no date on when they'll be avail. I've heard good things about Fullriver Battery (http://www.fullriverbattery.com). I'm planning on adding 4 of their 6V AGMs to my battery bank
Scott
2005 Newmar Dutch Star 3810, Spartan, Cat C7 350 "OURVEE"
Eezrv TPMS, VMSpc, 800W Solar
2002 Dodge RAM 1500 Quad Cab "RTOAD"
Stowmaster towbar & Brakemaster

Kevin Means

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Re: Boondocking/working online/electrical system design help needed
« Reply #20 on: March 03, 2016, 12:05:20 PM »
Hi Frank... A couple of things - First, I think AGMs are the greatest thing since sliced bread. Other than dusting them off once in awhile, they require no maintenance whatsoever. You're going to pay for that, because they're pricey - and you'll want to make sure that you have a charger and solar controller that charges them properly (they have a slightly different charging profile than standard lead-acid batteries) but they're well worth it IMO.

You mentioned not going to an MPPT controller unless your panels' output exceeds 600 watts. Some PWM controllers will work near that 600 watt threshold, but nowhere near as efficiently as an MPPT controller. PWM controllers work fine on high wattage systems, but only if the battery-banks they're charging aren't drawn down very far. If the RV's batteries get drawn down overnight like most RV battery-banks do, a PWM controller probably won't be able to put enough amps back into the batteries during the next solar charging cycle to fully recharge them. PWM controllers can't convert higher voltages from larger arrays to amps like MPPT controllers can, so a lot of solar power gets wasted.

Something else to consider - In the winter months, when most RVers really use their solar, the only way the concept of, "One watt of solar for every amp-hour of battery" will work, is if the panels are tilted toward the sun. If you're not going to tilt them, you'll need more panels to overcome the array's lower output due to the low solar angle, especially if you're going to be consuming more power than what is typical.

We've got eight Group 31 AGM house-batteries (840 AH capacity) and in the winter, our flat-mounted 970 watt solar array puts out just enough power on sunny days to fully recharge the batteries (with typical use). There's no way 840 watts of solar would fully recharge them in the winter. It would in the summer, when the sun is more overhead, but not in the winter unless the panels were tilted.

Kev
« Last Edit: March 03, 2016, 12:21:09 PM by Kevin Means »
2011 Winnebago Tour 42QD
Towing a Jeep Rubicon Unlimited LJ or an Acura MDX
RVI Brake 2, Minder TM-66 TPMS, 970 watts of solar
(Can't wait to spend more time RVing)
Lakeside, California

Frankedj

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Re: Boondocking/working online/electrical system design help needed
« Reply #21 on: March 07, 2016, 01:05:57 PM »
I have had to change up the plans again as the new sound bar is not substantial enough for me. This will bump me back up to six 6 volt batteries and more of everything else that goes with it.

I will have to be mindful of the weights on everything and the distribution of it. The couch and subwoofer that I build will have considerable weight to them in one location on one side which will have to be balanced by something like the batteries.
1988 HR Imperial 33'
700 watts Renogy Mono solar panels
Tri-Star 60A PWM Solar Controller
Magnum MS2012-15B Pure Sine Inv.
Wireless remote solar tilt
TM-2030RV-F TriMetric Battery Monitor
Six Crown 6CRV220 AGM batteries with 4/0 cables
1,000+ watt 14 cabinet tri-amped sound system w/30 band EQ

RussOnTheRoad

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Re: Boondocking/working online/electrical system design help needed
« Reply #22 on: March 07, 2016, 01:40:59 PM »
Sounds like you've got lots of pre-installation analysis and planning yet to do. I'd like to offer an additional resource: Nina and Paul of WheelingIt.us have just installed a very sizable solar system. Nina, an excellent blogger, has written about it on her blog and it may prove useful reading for you. They went with lithium batteries. Although I know more than many I'm not an expert on batteries. If my understanding is correct, besides being way expensive, lithium batteries allow a greater draw down percentage than lead acid and they recharge much more quickly too. Plus, for the amount of ampere hours they store they are smaller and lighter than lead acid. How fast batteries can be recharged may be an important consideration for you, as well as size and weight.

I'd also encourage you to look at every possible way you can conserve. In my limited experience, 18 months of full-timing in a 30' Class C (it's for sale, BTW) I've come to conclude that lots of life-style changes are required--in many ways learning to do with less. You may have to let go of some things you'd rather not, or find new ways of doing them. I say this with regard to your use of electricity.

Separately, I have learned quite a bit from and have really appreciated and supported ($) HandyBob for his generosity in helping me out.

HTH.

Frankedj

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Re: Boondocking/working online/electrical system design help needed
« Reply #23 on: March 07, 2016, 02:00:57 PM »
Sounds like you've got lots of pre-installation analysis and planning yet to do. I'd like to offer an additional resource: Nina and Paul of WheelingIt.us have just installed a very sizable solar system. Nina, an excellent blogger, has written about it on her blog and it may prove useful reading for you. They went with lithium batteries. Although I know more than many I'm not an expert on batteries. If my understanding is correct, besides being way expensive, lithium batteries allow a greater draw down percentage than lead acid and they recharge much more quickly too. Plus, for the amount of ampere hours they store they are smaller and lighter than lead acid. How fast batteries can be recharged may be an important consideration for you, as well as size and weight.

I'd also encourage you to look at every possible way you can conserve. In my limited experience, 18 months of full-timing in a 30' Class C (it's for sale, BTW) I've come to conclude that lots of life-style changes are required--in many ways learning to do with less. You may have to let go of some things you'd rather not, or find new ways of doing them. I say this with regard to your use of electricity.

Separately, I have learned quite a bit from and have really appreciated and supported ($) HandyBob for his generosity in helping me out.

HTH.

Thanks for the info. Little by little I have already started changing my habits. I am weaning myself down in multiple areas.

Maybe over time I will go up in quality battery wise but just starting out I don't see myself spending that much for Lion batteries. I am currently budgeting the electric at $5,000.00 or somewhere around that.

Counting 10 grand for an RV my budget is about $22,000.00. The couch and sound system will be  $2,300.00 to build. I will have a complete list of mods and material costs and have the order of how things are done before I start spending any money so I know upfront what I need to spend and what is done when.

Changing the interior into something that looks like me is on my list of priorities as this will be my home. I need to feel at home and not just like I am living in a regular RV. Most of what I install will move with me if/when I upgrade RV's in the future.
1988 HR Imperial 33'
700 watts Renogy Mono solar panels
Tri-Star 60A PWM Solar Controller
Magnum MS2012-15B Pure Sine Inv.
Wireless remote solar tilt
TM-2030RV-F TriMetric Battery Monitor
Six Crown 6CRV220 AGM batteries with 4/0 cables
1,000+ watt 14 cabinet tri-amped sound system w/30 band EQ

kdbgoat

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Re: Boondocking/working online/electrical system design help needed
« Reply #24 on: March 07, 2016, 02:44:51 PM »
I have had to change up the plans again as the new sound bar is not substantial enough for me.

Please be aware when camping, that your neighbors most likely don't want to hear your music, that especially means the bass thumping out of the subwoofer. The walls on any RV don't go far for soundproofing.
I know you believe you understand what you think I said,
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2016 Leprechaun 319DS

Frankedj

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Re: Boondocking/working online/electrical system design help needed
« Reply #25 on: March 07, 2016, 03:14:27 PM »
Please be aware when camping, that your neighbors most likely don't want to hear your music, that especially means the bass thumping out of the subwoofer. The walls on any RV don't go far for soundproofing.

I am very respectful of others at all times in regards to my music and everything else. I plan on spending the majority of my time away from others with only the occasional visit to an RV park or campground. I would never turn up the volume while around other people.

The only way most people will ever know that I have a sound system is if they are invited to see it. I can't stand annoying, disrespectful & noisy neighbors. It is a major pet peeve of mine.
1988 HR Imperial 33'
700 watts Renogy Mono solar panels
Tri-Star 60A PWM Solar Controller
Magnum MS2012-15B Pure Sine Inv.
Wireless remote solar tilt
TM-2030RV-F TriMetric Battery Monitor
Six Crown 6CRV220 AGM batteries with 4/0 cables
1,000+ watt 14 cabinet tri-amped sound system w/30 band EQ

kdbgoat

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  • Posts: 3961
Re: Boondocking/working online/electrical system design help needed
« Reply #26 on: March 07, 2016, 06:47:29 PM »
Thanx for your consideration. Maybe some day our paths will cross and you extend an invite to give your system a listen. I'm old, but still enjoy a good sounding system.
I know you believe you understand what you think I said,
But I am not sure you realize what you heard is not what I meant


2016 Leprechaun 319DS

Fiona Rose

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  • Posts: 40
  • Full time RV'er ~ planning for a boondock life
    • Fiona Rose Illustrations
Re: Boondocking/working online/electrical system design help needed
« Reply #27 on: March 12, 2016, 10:11:33 AM »
Just as an FYI, Trojan has recalled their 105 AGMs and suspended production due to failures in the case; no date on when they'll be avail. I've heard good things about Fullriver Battery (http://www.fullriverbattery.com). I'm planning on adding 4 of their 6V AGMs to my battery bank

Thanks, Sun2Retire.  I saw they suspended production until "spring 2016" and was wondering why.
2014  20' Keystone Springdale 202QBWE  TT
1998  Chevy Tahoe

~Currently living in her on friends' property
~Getting set to hit the highway this summer

JDOnTheGo

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  • Posts: 395
    • JdFinley.com
Re: Boondocking/working online/electrical system design help needed
« Reply #28 on: March 15, 2016, 06:59:15 AM »
Hi Frank,  couple more things to consider....

An old-fashioned stove-top peculating coffee maker can be a good electrical energy saver (but does consume some propane). Another option is a french press (boil the water in a tea kettle on the stove) but I found mine to be too messy for my liking.

Several of the Class C guys that I know with solar have insufficient roof space so they have a couple of extra "ground mounted" panels. Of course, they have to store these things somewhere when on the move.

When living this lifestyle, there are some adjustments that one has to make. Conserving electrical energy is one, conserving data is often another.  For me, conserving data was the harder task (employed software engineer that like to stream music and video).

Best of luck with your project!  Solar is a very awesome thing!
JD - Full timer out west
1998 MCI 102 EL3 Revolution | 2010 Wrangler (daJeep) | 650 Watts Solar
My Adventures

Frankedj

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  • Posts: 117
Re: Boondocking/working online/electrical system design help needed
« Reply #29 on: March 15, 2016, 10:12:06 AM »
Hi Frank,  couple more things to consider....

An old-fashioned stove-top peculating coffee maker can be a good electrical energy saver (but does consume some propane). Another option is a french press (boil the water in a tea kettle on the stove) but I found mine to be too messy for my liking.

Several of the Class C guys that I know with solar have insufficient roof space so they have a couple of extra "ground mounted" panels. Of course, they have to store these things somewhere when on the move.

When living this lifestyle, there are some adjustments that one has to make. Conserving electrical energy is one, conserving data is often another.  For me, conserving data was the harder task (employed software engineer that like to stream music and video).

Best of luck with your project!  Solar is a very awesome thing!

Coffee is an important part of my day everyday. Being a man that likes tools, I had to have this coffee maker as soon as I first saw it. https://oxx.com/thecoffeeboxx/ It will only use 1,450 watts for 70 seconds for a cup of coffee so it won't be a constant draw.

I have started looking at Class A's now. I had a notion in my head about wanting a Class C since they closely resemble the box trucks that I have experience driving. If I can learn how to safely operate a box truck I can learn to drive a Class A.

I am currently learning how to reduce my internet bandwidth usage. I just received my Galaxy Tablet yesterday along with a bluetooth keyboard. I have unlimited data on both it and the new phone so I can stream music from youtube through the soundbar with bluetooth. I used to have music playing from youtube about 20 hours a day. I am inching my way towards not using my desktop computer 24/7 for everything but I think I will have to find a full size bluetooth keyboard for the Tablet. The one I got that fits the Tablet is nice but is still not big enough for the size of my hands. My thumbs are 1 inch wide so typing on tiny keys or screens causes me a lot of frustration.

My new small sound system design for the RV kind of grew as my projects always do. It went from $1,500 to a little over $2,500. I spent 3 decade as a nightclub DJ and doing sound design so it is something that is always with me in some fashion. The weight/weight distribution is a concern that stays on my mind and one of the reasons why I am looking at Class A's now. The combined weight of the sound and solar will be the heaviest parts even though I am not going too overboard on the size of the sound. I can put the AGM's inside and use them to balance the weight of the couch & bass speakers.

The weight of the couch I want to build will also be considerable. I have $400.00 invested in the frame for it. It will end up being around $1,500 by the time I order the rest of the parts needed.

My budget for the RV is also going up. My budget for pretty much every project that I do for myself ends up going up. I still have lots of time left and won't be leaving until sometime later this year once I am ready. Downsizing the 48" flatscreen won't be easy if I can't make it fit. I think I can make it fit by installing it over a large window. I am good at figuring out how to install things that look impossible to do.

I will actually be installing two sound systems. One in the dash plus the one in the back. They will stay separated power and audio wise. One for driving and the other for when parked. The one in the dash will stay typical with no external power amps and use regular car stereo speakers.

I still have much to plan but I am taking my time in doing it and slowly adjusting my normal ways to what will fit the new lifestyle for when the time comes. The unusual sound system and couch are things that will make me feel at home which is my goal. I want to create a space that is totally me and a place that I feel comfortable in. The insides of the RV that I drive will be very unusual.

The sound system:
2 - 10" subwoofers in 14.25"H x 14.25"W x 15"D sealed boxes
16 - 4" woofers in 4" PVC pipe (think Bose 901 speakers from the 1970's)
4 - 4" midbass
4 - 4" midrange
4 - horn loaded tweeters
2 - 4 ch Pioneer amplifiers
1 - 2 ch Pioneer amplifier
2 - 2 way active crossovers
4 - 3 way passive crossovers

Now if I could only design solar with the ease that I design sound systems I would be all set. One thing that I will really miss is ordering things online and having them delivered.
1988 HR Imperial 33'
700 watts Renogy Mono solar panels
Tri-Star 60A PWM Solar Controller
Magnum MS2012-15B Pure Sine Inv.
Wireless remote solar tilt
TM-2030RV-F TriMetric Battery Monitor
Six Crown 6CRV220 AGM batteries with 4/0 cables
1,000+ watt 14 cabinet tri-amped sound system w/30 band EQ

 

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