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Author Topic: Dish vs. Direct TV  (Read 2099 times)

Jeepinbob

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Dish vs. Direct TV
« on: March 08, 2016, 12:05:32 AM »
Bob here.  My house is in escrow (finally) and due to close middle of April.  I need to get set up with satelitte tv.   My RV is already set up with a Windgard system, automatic seeking roof dish (Direct), and two older Direct TV receivers inside.  The Windgard system works very well.  One button makes the dish extend, and it seeks satelite signal until it locks in on three.  It is a high end system.

Here is my dilemma, and I hope some folks can share their experiences (good or bad) with Dish TV vs. irect TV.  Naturally cost is a factor.  I prefer movie channels, and I don't need 500 channels.  I would like to get local network channels too.

Also, I understand there is a switching process for the east coast vs. the west coast.  If so, please enlighten me.  All of your input will certainly help me make a decision.  I've also been told it could matter as to where, and with who, you start the service with.  I know there are companies where you buy the equipment and they service you for the first year?

Thank so much folks.  Bob
2004 Alpine FTDS 40, AKA The Silver Bullet
2004 Harley Road King Classic on Hydralift
2002 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 4x4 (toad)

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: Dish vs. Direct TV
« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2016, 07:58:24 AM »
Why do you think the Direct TV set-up you have will be unacceptable?  I would suggest getting a subscription and using it for awhile and see.

The East/West thing relates to DNS (Distance Network Services), which means you select either East or West network feeds in lieu of any local channels. Using DNS avoids having to call in for a service area change each time you move. I think you can only get DNS on Direct these days, but maybe that has changed.

The other factor is High Def reception. You can't get Direct's Hi-def satellite if you have a dome antenna. You need an open fact dish for that.

There are articles in the forum Library on getting tv on the road. They are a bit dated, but the basics are still correct. Here is one of them, but there are a couple more:
Satellite TV
« Last Edit: March 08, 2016, 08:01:09 AM by Gary RV Roamer »
Gary
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Clay L

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Re: Dish vs. Direct TV
« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2016, 12:08:43 PM »
As a full timer that traveled all over the country I preferred Direct because there is a menu option that lets you change the time zone to wherever you are. The guide listing then is correct for your location. According to a friend that has Dish they require that you call them to change the time zone which was a real pita for him.
Clay (WA5NMR), Lee (Wife), Katie & Kelli (cats), Sali (toy poodle)
Settled down after full timing for eleven years and snowbirding for one year in a 2004 Winnebago 35N Sightseer, Workhorse W 20 Chassis. Honda toad

Jeepinbob

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Re: Dish vs. Direct TV
« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2016, 08:13:42 PM »
I am not opposed to Direct TV Gary.  I am just wondering who has the best service in regard to effiency, package costs, contract double talk, easiest to use and terms.  Also where is the best place to buy the service, from a  contractor, or at a ralley, thru corporate,  or any other options.

I read somewhere that the contract with Direct is a one way contract (which really isn't a contract) in that the customer has to abide by the contract, but Direct doesn't, as they can raise the price without any notice ( you know, fine print).

Mostly, I am just really leary about any of the communication companies, as they tell you one thing, and your bill shows something else.  Lesser of two evils?
2004 Alpine FTDS 40, AKA The Silver Bullet
2004 Harley Road King Classic on Hydralift
2002 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 4x4 (toad)

NY_Dutch

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Re: Dish vs. Direct TV
« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2016, 08:42:50 PM »
Pretty much all subscription media companies reserve the right to change prices at any time, although Dish and Direct normally limit those change to once a year. Increases among sat and cable companies are fueled in part by the increasing demands of the content providers, including annual increases included in multi-year carriage contracts.

The "east/west" issue is different with Dish than it is with Direct. With Direct the issue is whether you pay extra to receive the NY or SF(?) local network stations anywhere in the country, which requires no hardware changes. Dish does not offer a distant network choice (DNS), instead allowing changes to your service address at will as you move around in your RV, so you can receive the local network stations for your current location. With Dish, there are two satellite arcs to choose from, one that's usually better suited for east of the Mississippi reception, and the other arc that's usually better suited for western reception. Each arc has three satellites, each carrying various programming. Either arc is available pretty much nation wide though. Your Winegard Trav'ler automatic dish is currently set up for DirecTV, and converting to Dish network reception would be a costly change. Also, the Dish version of the Trav'ler is limited to the western arc satellites only in automatic mode, although it can be manually aimed for one of the three eastern arc sats.
« Last Edit: March 08, 2016, 08:45:02 PM by NY_Dutch »
Dutch
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ArdraF

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Re: Dish vs. Direct TV
« Reply #5 on: March 09, 2016, 06:26:30 PM »
Quote
The "east/west" issue is different with Dish than it is with Direct. With Direct the issue is whether you pay extra to receive the NY or SF(?) local network stations anywhere in the country, which requires no hardware changes. Dish does not offer a distant network choice (DNS)

The DNS stations for east/west are New York and Los Angeles and include ABC, CBS, and NBC in the 390s channels on DirecTV.  About two years ago they split the country in half so you receive the east coast stations if you live "roughly" east of the Mississippi and west coast stations if you live to the west of it.  With Dish there apparently is a separate provider of DNS and that provider handles it's own billing and customers (don't have Dish so don't know details).

ArdraF
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NY_Dutch

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Re: Dish vs. Direct TV
« Reply #6 on: March 09, 2016, 07:25:01 PM »
The DNS stations for east/west are New York and Los Angeles and include ABC, CBS, and NBC in the 390s channels on DirecTV.  About two years ago they split the country in half so you receive the east coast stations if you live "roughly" east of the Mississippi and west coast stations if you live to the west of it.  With Dish there apparently is a separate provider of DNS and that provider handles it's own billing and customers (don't have Dish so don't know details).

ArdraF
Dish does not have a DNS provider for their subscribers. The former DNS provider, All American Direct, shut down in early 2014. Since Dish makes it very easy to change service locations as you travel, there's little call for DNS anymore. Personally, I much prefer getting the locals for the area I'm in anyway. And there's no extra charge for them...  ;)
Dutch
2001 GBM Landau 34' Class A
F53 Chassis, Triton V10, TST TPMS
2011 Toyota RAV4 4WD/Remco pump
ReadyBrute Elite tow bar/Blue Ox base plate

driftless shifter

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Re: Dish vs. Direct TV
« Reply #7 on: March 09, 2016, 11:51:14 PM »
^^^
Exactly what he said. I've had Dish change my location twice within a half hour. Set up job site near Laredo TX. Set up the dish and was still within range of San Antonio transponder. Thought we would rather have local news and weather so we changed our location over the phone. 10 minutes later when receiver had finished down loading channel guide we discovered that our TV was speaking mostly Spanish, we don't speak Spanish. Called Dish back and had it switched back to San Antonio. Absolutely no problem other than making two phone calls and waiting for receiver to download. If that is a problem for someone it would be a personal issue not a Dish issue.

To the original question. You already have the Direct TV equipment. If it all works why not save yourself a boat load of money and use what you have? You do know the your Direct TV roof top automatic dish won't work for Dish TV, right?

Bill
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taoshum

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Re: Dish vs. Direct TV
« Reply #8 on: March 10, 2016, 09:48:16 AM »
With all that "high end" equipment on your rig set up for Direct... do you really want to replace that to use Dish?
07 Itasca Meridian 34SH.  '08 Jeep Sahara.
Taos, NM.

Jeepinbob

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Re: Dish vs. Direct TV
« Reply #9 on: March 11, 2016, 12:47:09 AM »
I'm good with Direct TV.  I'm sure the receivers are too old to use, and I agree it would be cheaper to use the existing Direct dish that is already mounted.  This isn't the dome dish, it is the armature dish that raised itself.

Gentlemen, I thank all of you for your input.  Your advise will be well used.  Bob
2004 Alpine FTDS 40, AKA The Silver Bullet
2004 Harley Road King Classic on Hydralift
2002 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 4x4 (toad)

zulu

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Re: Dish vs. Direct TV
« Reply #10 on: March 16, 2016, 08:35:43 PM »
With all that "high end" equipment on your rig set up for Direct... do you really want to replace that to use Dish?

It might not be high end. OP could have the SD (Standard Definition) DirecTV Winegard Travler (the SK-3003).

Until DISH's 16-tuner Hopper 3 was released, I'd say it was neck and neck between DISH & DirecTV. Not anymore.

It will cost about $300 (2015 price) to upgrade your DirecTV Winegard Travler to the DISH version. You'll need these two Winegard kits:
  • RP-SK11 DISH 1000.2 reflector ($24.99)
  • RP-SK21 Back-up and feed arm assembly with LNB ($255)

Regardless of what sat service you select, contact a local sat installer to do the work.  Don't go through DISH or DirecTV directly. Both sat providers tend to get their bloomers ruffled over RV installs.

If you're interested in the Hopper 3 for your RV, see http://rvseniormoments.com/tech-docs/dish-tv-for-rvs/hopper-3-the-winegard-travler/
Full Timer
2001 Newmar Mountain Aire
DISH TV for RVs

 

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