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Author Topic: asked to leave  (Read 4332 times)

sherryh

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asked to leave
« on: April 10, 2016, 07:40:05 PM »
I was wondering how everyone handles the situation , when you are asked too leave. i don't mean wal-marts ect. but in places that maybe you have boondocks before and now BLM or "others" say it's now closed to camping and its not posted. We were asked to leave an area and we had no other place to go and it was very upsetting to my husband and I, we felt like freeloaders and i can tell you my husband and i have worked very hard until retirement. we are thinking maybe we need a camp host job that way we have a place to park when we want to go to a place on our journey of full timing. We thought this would be fun and after 4 years we are starting to wonder. We love the life but finding the right spot is taking the fun right out of it. I need words of wisdom!

Sun2Retire

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Re: asked to leave
« Reply #1 on: April 10, 2016, 07:47:34 PM »
Interesting question. As one who has done some dry camping and is planning on doing a lot of boondocking, where exactly was this and who exactly asked you to leave?
Scott
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Tom

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Re: asked to leave
« Reply #2 on: April 10, 2016, 08:11:09 PM »
Here's the story of the only time we were asked to move on.
Tom.  Need help? Click the Help button in the toolbar above.

halfwright

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Re: asked to leave
« Reply #3 on: April 10, 2016, 08:19:04 PM »
I would want to know the person asking me to leave had the authority to do that. Or, is he another camper who wants more privacy? I was not able to find the exact rules about the BLM and Taylor Graze land, but I think that the rancher leases only the grazing rights to the land and cannot restrict access. There should be someone on the forum with more knowledge than I have. If it shows as BLM land on a map, it is open to public use.
Jim And Darlene Wright
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robertusa123

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Re: asked to leave
« Reply #4 on: April 10, 2016, 08:38:22 PM »
I had the same thing happen in the national forest.... Some guy told.me I could not camp.where I was set up.   Not a ranger or sherif officer.... I asked for ID. At that point he got loud. At that point I called the police and park ranger....... Part ranger told me they been haveing problems with locals that thaut they own the forest.
1996  26ft. 3 kids 2 dog and the wife too

ArdraF

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Re: asked to leave
« Reply #5 on: April 10, 2016, 08:40:11 PM »
If you haven't seen them, the BLM has some brochures defining their "free camping" and pay camping areas.  I believe they also have maps.  The free areas around Quartzsite AZ are pretty well defined and there are No Camping Beyond This Point signs where they don't want you to go.  Perhaps you were mistakenly in one of the non-camping areas??

ArdraF
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Sun2Retire

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Re: asked to leave
« Reply #6 on: April 10, 2016, 08:49:19 PM »
BLM has some brochures defining their "free camping" and pay camping areas.  I believe they also have maps.  The free areas around Quartzsite AZ are pretty well defined and there are No Camping Beyond This Point signs where they don't want you to go.
Where can one get these brochures?
Scott
2005 Newmar Dutch Star 3810, Spartan, Cat C7 350 "OURVEE"
Eezrv TPMS, VMSpc, 800W Solar
2002 Dodge RAM 1500 Quad Cab "RTOAD"
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ArdraF

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Re: asked to leave
« Reply #7 on: April 10, 2016, 09:27:25 PM »
I picked ours up at the ranger station where we have the RV Forum rally in Quartzsite AZ.  I should think they would be available at any of the BLM ranger stations.  They publish their rules and regulations for camping on BLM lands so it might be a good idea to visit one of them so you learn what you can and cannot do.

ArdraF
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JiminDenver

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Re: asked to leave
« Reply #8 on: April 10, 2016, 11:42:09 PM »
Finding the right spots is part of the fun for me be it on the net or exploring while out. The first rule is never be where we are not suppose to be. You can get pretty good info and maps on the web but things change. Should a ranger, Sheriff or what not tell me I'm wrong, so be it. Time to pack it up and do a better job next time.

I have no idea how it works in other states but here you can find a office to call for each area. General info on the sites and maps to be had.

JDOnTheGo

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Re: asked to leave
« Reply #9 on: April 11, 2016, 06:18:59 AM »
Need more info sherryh.  What type of land were you on, who told you to leave, what was the reason?
JD - Full timer out west
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JX2Fields

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Re: asked to leave
« Reply #10 on: April 11, 2016, 06:47:49 AM »
 Alas times are changing, lots of places you used to be able to camp at are now off limits (BLM,Forest Service, State Parks, Private forest land) have decided you can not use that ground any more. I worked for a private forest landowner who back in the time left the land open to the public, but had to put gates up and shut it off to the public because of a few and Lawyers and law suits. I can understand this I saw how the public did this to there self ,but  public land is a different story and I have seen a lot of public ground put off limits to the public. If you want to see it in all its glory go along the California Coast.
John & Judy
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Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: asked to leave
« Reply #11 on: April 11, 2016, 07:22:12 AM »
If you are looking exclusively for free places to camp, it behooves you to "know the rules". As Ardra mentioned, there are brochures (and also online sources) that help identify BLM land that is open for camping. The US Forest Service and Corp of Engineers have similar info, as do many state agencies. There are even smart phone apps that list free camping locations. It can be a bit bewildering to sort through them all, but it's part of the adventure.

Here are some websites that help identify places:
https://freecampsites.net/
http://www.rv-camping.org/freervcamping/
https://www.campendium.com/free-camping

Workamping is certainly an alternative, though I would not call it "free" (you are trading your labor for a campsite). We workamped in private campgrounds for several years and enjoyed it, but it's not for everyone.
Gary
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Hfx_Cdn

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Re: asked to leave
« Reply #12 on: April 11, 2016, 07:49:08 AM »
     Here is an old link to COE lands about boondocking:  http://www.rv-camping.org/boondocking/

Ed
Ed & Donna
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Koodog

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Re: asked to leave
« Reply #13 on: April 11, 2016, 08:44:52 AM »
Only time I've see public land shut off from use is where idiots destroyed the land because they feel "stay on trail" notices are not meant for them. Irresponsible gun owners mowing down the forest instead of shooting at targets. Have also seen where lazy campers cut live trees down for firewood because they are either too lazy or too drunk  to walk a little to cut up downfalls or pick up branches. Bottom line .....abuse it and lose it.

Still awaiting your response to questions asked about your circumstances. Many of us would like to know the specifics.
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sherryh

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Re: asked to leave
« Reply #14 on: April 11, 2016, 09:36:55 AM »
we are in oregon and i found out more info from the host yesterday as he was so mad the first day that didn't get much info, and he also let us stay for 2 days. this land was not bought (he said) but now co-owned by the indian rez and they are putting in an RV resort. The horse camping was a pay as you stay (we don't have horses but did) and he said no one was paying so they decided to go another way. we thought it was government property but i guess we were wrong. Last year when we stayed the "guy" formen kept asking us to stay because we were keeping the place clean. Now new guy, new year and everything has changed in the last 6 months. I will admit that my husband and i don't research the lands like we should. We both were borned and raised in oregon and have camped everywhere and anywhere we wanted and i admit that most of our years of camping have been tent or slide in the truck camper, so i would say we were pretty mobil and now we are in a 34' 5th wheel, not so mobil and not so unseen! this is different for us and I think we liked it better being more mobil but we like being more comfortable. we need to rethink the size of the 5th wheel, we got to stary eyed when we saw the beautiful montana and it comfort, but now we are not doing what makes us happy and thats more moving  around, and knowing where to go being so big.  I hope this answers the questions

JDOnTheGo

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Re: asked to leave
« Reply #15 on: April 11, 2016, 09:46:38 AM »
Sherryh, given that additional information, I think getting told to leave would be a fairly regular occurrence as it does not sound like you are following the rules. Given that, you should probably celebrate when allowed to stay and accept the alternative as the norm instead of being discouraged by it. I'd suggest doing some research and only staying where it is allowed (following the rules).  There is a lot of information available online (NFS and BLM maps, ranger stations, etc.).
JD - Full timer out west
1998 MCI 102 EL3 Revolution | 2010 Wrangler (daJeep) | 650 Watts Solar
My Adventures

dave54

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Re: asked to leave
« Reply #16 on: April 11, 2016, 11:39:39 AM »
We prefer to boondock in areas so remote no one can find us.
I never get lost.  I just have unplanned adventures.

halfwright

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Re: asked to leave
« Reply #17 on: April 11, 2016, 12:16:08 PM »
Size of the fifth wheel does not come into play in this situation.  Camp where you are allowed to camp  and no one will say a word. But, I know in New Mexico and Arizona, Indians are very protective of reservation land. I would assume they are in Oregon also.

Things do change and sometimes it can be hard to get the latest information about camping. Do not get upset or give up your trailer because of land ownership change. Try to have current  information. Check with local BLM, forest service and state offices if you have a question.  Sometimes local law enforcement can be helpful.

Property owners have rights, and you "own" the public land. Just make sure it is still public.   
Jim And Darlene Wright
Full-timing with
Ryder, the Ethiopian monkeybeaver dog
and a long-haired vacuum cleaner terrior
All in a
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2002 F250 Super duty 7.3 liter

530ktm

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Re: asked to leave
« Reply #18 on: April 11, 2016, 12:35:18 PM »
We prefer to boondock in areas so remote no one can find us.
I would like to see these places while moving around in a 35 foot RV. I have been around and have yet to find one of these spots where nobody can find us.     8)
2014 Itasca Sunova 33C from SoCal pulling Jeep Wrangler

John From Detroit

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Re: asked to leave
« Reply #19 on: April 11, 2016, 12:46:47 PM »
We prefer to boondock in areas so remote no one can find us.

There are days I wish I could find some spots like that :).

Only cases I know of where folks have been ask to leave fall into one of two groups:

1: Law Enforcement had to be called and in some cases the RVer asked to leave.. was taken out in handcuffs.

2: Park change the rules "No Kids Allowed" or some such (3 of those, they moved in here, one is now camp host).

Neither applies to this thread.

ON TOPIC:

As someone said Public land is sometimes closed because people disregard the rules.. Also because there is a movement to sell off public (and native) land for industrial/commercial use..  Thus. land that was public last time you visited, is no longer public.. 
Nothing adds excitement like something that is none of your business
My Home is where I park it.

ArdraF

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Re: asked to leave
« Reply #20 on: April 11, 2016, 08:08:20 PM »
Reservation lands are always restricted.  If you cross the reservation on a "public" road you are expected to stay on the road and not drift away from it.  There are many places that you cannot go unless accompanied by one of the native reservation people.  It's too bad you had the unpleasant experience, but if you want to camp in restricted areas then you need to make an attempt to learn the boundaries.  I doubt you need to find another RV but learn what is open to you and what is not.

ArdraF
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sherryh

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Re: asked to leave
« Reply #21 on: April 12, 2016, 09:26:56 AM »
Thank you for all the kind words. We are looking at this in a whole new light, we are getting equipped with all the maps and programs so we can boondock smart. We now realize that this is a whole new way of living. Like i said we were so used to throwing on the camper and going, we have been camping/ boondocking in Oregon, Idaho, Washington, Montana, Wyoming no reservation no plan, but i think even with that being said that way is gone and lands are more restricted, thats ok.

ArdraF

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Re: asked to leave
« Reply #22 on: April 12, 2016, 07:34:43 PM »
Sherryh, you're right.  Those days are gone.  We also used to just take off and go wherever we felt like going.  Sad to say, too many people didn't take care of the land and "they" started making rules to restrict usage.  I recall back about 1972 we camped overnight on the old Lexington to Concord road where the Revolutionary War started.  We made sure locals saw us pick up their kids' beer cans and other trash and they received us well.  You can't do things like that today.  But we still clean up the area....

ArdraF
ArdraF
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dave54

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Re: asked to leave
« Reply #23 on: April 12, 2016, 08:02:07 PM »
As a general rule, all NF land is open to disperse camp (FS term for boondocking) unless specifically closed. 
Closed areas may be within 1/4 mile of a developed campground (to prevent someone from disperse camping, not paying CG fees, but still using the CG facilities), closed for environmental reasons (sensitive plants or soils, endangered species habitat, archaeological site), or the area is so popular allowing unrestricted boondocking would just overwhelm the area.  In the last case camping is restricted to developed CGs and the closure area should be delineated on the map.  The southern California national forests are different.  They have over 15 million people within a 2 hour drive and so have very restrictive rules.

BLM is similar to the FS.

National Parks are closed unless specifically allowed.

Tribal lands are not public lands, despite many public lands maps including them.  Tribal governments can set whatever rules they want.  In many respects tribal lands are politically autonomous to the federal or state governments.  They are, in many ways, foreign countries that lie within the U.S. borders.

State lands vary by state.
I never get lost.  I just have unplanned adventures.

Trailer traveler

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Re: asked to leave
« Reply #24 on: May 02, 2016, 10:50:02 AM »
...As a general rule, all NF land is open to disperse camp (FS term for boondocking) unless specifically closed...
The National Forest Service regulations address two types of dispersed camping. The first is tent/back pack camping which is generally permitted unless specifically prohibited. The second type of dispersed camping is vehicle/RV camping. This type of camping is restricted to roads open for vehicle traffic and often limited to a specified distance from the open roadway. That distance can vary considerably even on different roads in the same Forest. I have seen limits ranging from 30-300'. The roads open to motorized vehicle traffic are listed on the Travel Management Maps and Motor Vehicle Use Maps. (MVUM). This website has links to many of the MVUM. Each Forest has its own rules regarding length of stay (generally 14-21 days), how far one has to move in miles to reset the length of stay limit and in some cases where Homesteading has become a problem how many days in a month one can stay in that particular Forest. As far as I know, the National Forests have no Long Term Visitor Areas (LTVAs) like BLM does in Arizona and California.
« Last Edit: May 02, 2016, 02:59:16 PM by Trailer traveler »

dave54

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Re: asked to leave
« Reply #25 on: May 04, 2016, 12:27:24 PM »
The NF MVUM rules you outlined are technically correct.  However, each NF interprets and enforces the regulations differently.  Many give enforcement a very low priority, and as long as you are not doing something stupid (like cutting vegetation to get further from the road, or tearing up a wet meadow) they may ignore you.  They are not likely to get out a tape measure and check the distance from your bumper to the road edge.
The 14 day rule is in the same category.  In popular areas it is more strictly enforced than remote seldom used areas.  The intent of the rule is to prevent long term occupancy (squatting), or preventing someone from occupying prime camping spots for extended periods.  Often ignored out in the more remote parts of the forest.  One FS LEO told me he ignored one elderly man camping in one remote spot for months because "He was my eyes and ears in an area I seldom patrol."

  I am not advocating ignoring the regulations, just that in many areas you may be able to remote area disperse camp in peace even if contrary to the letter of the regulations.  The FS gives their officers a great deal of latitude in enforcement.   Keep a clean camp with a minimum of soil/vegetation disturbance you may be allowed to stay.  Still, the MVUM regulations are in effect and you may be cited, especially if you flunk the attitude test.
I never get lost.  I just have unplanned adventures.

 

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