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Author Topic: Their are draw backs to camping in the national forest  (Read 2228 times)

robertusa123

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Their are draw backs to camping in the national forest
« on: July 06, 2016, 08:04:33 PM »
In my case is poorly maintained dirt roads.  The paddle I drove thure was more like a pond with a nice hidden bolder.  But could have been worse. I it could have hit the drain assembly
1996  26ft. 3 kids 2 dog and the wife too

dave54

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  • Posts: 178
  • Old guy. Loves being outdoors
Re: Their are draw backs to camping in the national forest
« Reply #1 on: July 06, 2016, 09:35:36 PM »
Are you familiar with the road signing system on NF roads?  The shape of the sign tells the maintenance level road.
I never get lost.  I just have unplanned adventures.

robertusa123

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Re: Their are draw backs to camping in the national forest
« Reply #2 on: July 07, 2016, 05:36:30 AM »
Not in my area.      The national forest road here are technically state roads. Or county roads.  About the only road maintenance by the park system is the blue ridge parkway....... on Holliday weekend when the ranger makes their  rounds  they are usaily teamed up with a local sheriff officer.    As it is the local forest ranger and state wildlife rangers don't like me because I started a local trend to refer to them as metter maids. Because they  only seem to be interested in writing citations
1996  26ft. 3 kids 2 dog and the wife too

Badlands Bob

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  • What could possibly go wrong?
Re: Their are draw backs to camping in the national forest
« Reply #3 on: July 07, 2016, 07:02:59 AM »
I folded up a stab jack at a Georgia state park several months ago.  I was pulling into a campsite and the right side tires dropped into a shallow drainage ditch.  Folded that stab jack 90 degrees.  Fortunately, it only cost me about $40 for a new one at the local camping store.  Tearing the drain valves off would have been a much bigger problem.
2015 Ford F-150 5.0
2016 Winnebago 2201 w/Equal-i-zer hitch

Rene T

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  • Great being on the right side of the grass
Re: Their are draw backs to camping in the national forest
« Reply #4 on: July 07, 2016, 07:15:55 AM »
If it's that bad, don't go there. Find some other place to camp.
Rene & Lucille & co-pilot Buddy
AKA  Pep N Mem
2011 Chevy Duramax 2500 HD 4X4
2011 Montana High Country 343RL
From the Granite State of NH
& Florida Snowbird in Lakeland FL

robertusa123

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Re: Their are draw backs to camping in the national forest
« Reply #5 on: July 07, 2016, 08:29:51 AM »
If it's that bad, don't go there. Find some other place to camp.
But it's free
Just wandering if it would kill then to fill a pothole every know and then.   I'm convinced they do this to force you into the pay area's which would it be so bad if they had space and hookups. Which they don't
1996  26ft. 3 kids 2 dog and the wife too

anniemae

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Re: Their are draw backs to camping in the national forest
« Reply #6 on: July 07, 2016, 08:42:02 AM »
I agree with Rene T.

Gary RV_Wizard

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Re: Their are draw backs to camping in the national forest
« Reply #7 on: July 07, 2016, 09:48:53 AM »
I live inside the Ocala National Forest, so see some of the road conditions you mention. We have everything from a major state highway to paved and numbered "Forest Roads" and to totally unimproved forest roads that are just emergency access for fire fighting. Some also provide access to "unimproved camping areas", and those can be pretty rough.  But realistically, isn't that what "unimproved" means? Sure the fee areas get at least a bit more maintenance, but that is what the fees help to provide.  There is no free lunch - somebody has to pay for road maintenance, either fees or tax dollars.
Gary
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Gary Brinck
Summers: Black Mountain, NC
Home: Ocala National Forest, FL

Corky

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Re: Their are draw backs to camping in the national forest
« Reply #8 on: July 07, 2016, 12:25:41 PM »
It's pretty hard to tell how bad a road/trail is without actually going over it. I've been in some pretty bad situations over the years, but the one thing I have always done is scout the area first. I know that to some that may seem unreasonable to do, but it has saved my keister numerous times.   
'05 Itasca Meridian 36G
15 Jeep Wrangler Orange toad
'86 Suzuki Samurai Camo dirt toad

robertusa123

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Re: Their are draw backs to camping in the national forest
« Reply #9 on: July 07, 2016, 01:12:18 PM »
 we have had an enormous amount of rain this fall and spring in the mid alantic this year.  It has taken a toll on the back road system
1996  26ft. 3 kids 2 dog and the wife too

dave54

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  • Old guy. Loves being outdoors
Re: Their are draw backs to camping in the national forest
« Reply #10 on: July 08, 2016, 09:32:31 AM »
If the road number sign is vertical:
1
2
3
4
The road is not designed for passenger vehicles.

If the sign is horizontal
1234
It is designed to be passable by passenger vehicles.
If the road sign is the rounded trapezoid design it is a main arterial and should be drivable by all vehicles.

Of course, after a rough winter or some other road event there could be stretches the maintenance crews have not fixed yet.
I never get lost.  I just have unplanned adventures.

VallAndMo

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  • Vall and Mo, a married couple getting ready for FT
Re: Their are draw backs to camping in the national forest
« Reply #11 on: July 08, 2016, 10:59:25 AM »
Hi Dave,

If the road number sign is vertical:
1
2
3
4
The road is not designed for passenger vehicles.

If the sign is horizontal
1234
It is designed to be passable by passenger vehicles.

This is GREAT info, many thanks for letting us know!

Quote
If the road sign is the rounded trapezoid design it is a main arterial and should be drivable by all vehicles.

Humrmrmrmr.... I'm not sure about what you mean with this last phrase. Wouldn't a passenger vehicle (which I understand would be 2WD, low clearance) be the one to require the best possible roads? What other kinds of vehicle would be able to drive a rounded trapezoid-signaled road, that would not be able to drive a horizontally-numbered one?

Cheers,
--
   Vall.

Gods Country

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Re: Their are draw backs to camping in the national forest
« Reply #12 on: July 08, 2016, 05:49:12 PM »
One of the things I do miss about my truck camper.
If the truck can make you're home free.

 

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