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Author Topic: Why did you? Class A v Class C  (Read 3472 times)

Skippityboo

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Why did you? Class A v Class C
« on: August 07, 2016, 02:10:13 PM »
I wanted to ask you experienced fulltimers why & how you decided on your motor home ...

I have two months to research, find & buy an RV for full time living (with an extra month to live / pack / fix any issues) before I have to leave the bitter cold of Illinois and follow the weather south.

I have lived in an RV full time once before, for around 6 months, but I didn't really deal with the buying / choice side of things. (meaning I'm familiar with waste disposal, size constraints etc, but not too familiar with driving one or fixing engines).

Yes, I understand its personal choice and floor plans etc ... but Why did you choose the type of motor home you live in now?

Originally I was looking at Class C's

- Easier to drive (I'm familiar with driving a truck)
- Easier to find someone to repair them engine wise (there is a ford dealer in every town)
- More indoor storage (I plan to use the above cab bunk for storage)
- More choice in the 30 foot or less rigs

However I just read that Class A's have ...

- Bigger everything (wheels, Axels, breaks, higher GVWR & GCWR, engines)
- More open floor plans (you can turn the front seats round for chairs)
- Tow and stop better
- Better views
- Higher gas/diesel mileage


Is there anything else on either category I should consider?

I'd really appreciate the advice from people who do this full time, as this is a HOME not a weekend jaunt.



2006 Ford F-250 (Diesel)
2015 Rockwood Mini Lite
Yorkies x 2

gwcowgill

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Re: Why did you? Class A v Class C
« Reply #1 on: August 07, 2016, 02:22:48 PM »
I had a Class B+ before which I really got claustrophobia in when I had to stay indoors. My Class A opens up into a huge living area which allows me to get up and walk around. I like the open space. There are many on here that would argue gas vs diesel but I will say that a lot of  the gas motorhomes are powered by Ford and can be serviced in most Ford dealerships. 2nd, I think a Class A is much easier to drive as they tend to be more stable especially the diesel pushers. You can find a lot of information and opinions in the library here.
2009 Bounder 36B, 2014 Honda CR-V, various grandchildren when school is out. KG4LHS
2014 Honda CRV Toad,
2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee Toad

Skippityboo

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Re: Why did you? Class A v Class C
« Reply #2 on: August 07, 2016, 07:05:02 PM »
Yeah, my last motor home was a Class A, 38 foot, GAS engine , with a tow ... I wouldn't do Gas at that size again.

Right now I'm looking at 30 foot being the length I feel comfortable driving. (I'm not going to tow, but might add a motorcycle carrier to the back which will add two foot).

I'm not too concerned about being claustrophobic, I've lived in the UK for the first 28 yrs of my life (my old UK house is about the SQ FT of my USA garage :) )

I'm actually looking forward to downgrading my possessions, limiting my on line usage, and seeing more of the world. Thats one of my major goals.

However I am a crafter and teacher so I need some storage space for my items and resources.

Other than size (bearing in mind I'm looking at 30 foot options across the board), why a Class A rather than a Class C?



 
2006 Ford F-250 (Diesel)
2015 Rockwood Mini Lite
Yorkies x 2

Becks

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Re: Why did you? Class A v Class C
« Reply #3 on: August 07, 2016, 08:58:49 PM »
More weight carrying capacity and more cargo capacity.
2006 Travel Supreme
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Skippityboo

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Re: Why did you? Class A v Class C
« Reply #4 on: August 08, 2016, 05:15:03 PM »
Thanks Becks.
2006 Ford F-250 (Diesel)
2015 Rockwood Mini Lite
Yorkies x 2

debsmg

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Re: Why did you? Class A v Class C
« Reply #5 on: August 08, 2016, 05:32:02 PM »
I am not full time yet but planning to go next year. I have a class c 29'5" Winnebago Aspect 27K. Love the big trunk. I just started towing a car. I have not found it difficult to drive. If I got bigger I would just load it with stuff I could live without. I have not found it hard to park at MN state parks. I looked at class A and went through some at WIT GNR. I am satisfied With my C.
Deb who is Hoooman servant to 2 cats
Kitcat and Spice and
Red Standard Poodle named Lucy

2016 Winnebago Aspect 27K
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JDOnTheGo

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Re: Why did you? Class A v Class C
« Reply #6 on: August 08, 2016, 06:14:57 PM »
Howdy Skippityboo, I can't imagine this will help since we are all different but, to answer your question...

I chose a 40' DP for solo full-timing because I wanted lots of living space, lots of storage space, lots of weight carrying ability, lots of roof space for solar panels, lots of holding tank capacity, and a very comfortable ride.  I am very happy with my choice.  However; nothing is free/everything is a compromise. I spend most of my time boondocking in the west and, with 40', I'm a little limited to the spots I can get into (that said, I get into some pretty great spots).  On a positive, I can stay a very long time because of holding tank size and lots of solar power.  The Jeep Wrangler I tow is such a small percentage of total weight that I can hardly tell its back there.  The Jeep also carries my yacht (kayak), fishing gear, mountain bicycle and road bicycle.

That is my answer to your question.  Lot's to add about your other comments but I don't think you were asking for that, or were you?
JD - Full timer out west
1998 MCI 102 EL3 Revolution | 2010 Wrangler (daJeep) | 650 Watts Solar
My Adventures

Skippityboo

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Re: Why did you? Class A v Class C
« Reply #7 on: August 08, 2016, 09:02:30 PM »
JFNM,

I'm here to learn! If you think you have something to add to my situation I'd love to hear it.


Question : DP? Diesel Pusher? (still learning all these terms).


So far I'm still leaning towards a 30 foot ish Class C, but the higher MPG of a similar sized Class A does appeal.

I just think I'd be more comfortable driving a truck rather than a bus, and that I hope that getting a truck would be easier to fix on the road should I run into trouble.

I'm not going to try towing (did that in my 38 foot Class A in 2010, and it was a royal PITA), instead I plan to get a scooter or small motorbike for my rear hitch for the quick runs to the shops.

2006 Ford F-250 (Diesel)
2015 Rockwood Mini Lite
Yorkies x 2

Skippityboo

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Re: Why did you? Class A v Class C
« Reply #8 on: August 08, 2016, 09:05:08 PM »
Debsmg,

Thats kinda my thinking. One of my goals of this "experiment" is to really reduce the items that own me.

2006 Ford F-250 (Diesel)
2015 Rockwood Mini Lite
Yorkies x 2

DutchEagle

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Re: Why did you? Class A v Class C
« Reply #9 on: August 08, 2016, 09:58:07 PM »
Yep DP means Diesel Pusher :)

I never drove a truck, never needed a truck and never wanted a truck. So I started driving our 40 Foot class A DP without experience other then a regular car. After 100 miles it already was comfortable to me. Yes I still had a lot to learn but I was driving very careful and did not let anyone rush me. Now after about 1000 miles its a pleasure to drive it and I can park it on a dime. Did a lot of practice in the weekends on an empty parking lot, backing up, turning left and right corners and getting a feel for how wide, long and high the RV is, what you can and cannot see in the mirrors and backup camera and so on. Really its not a big deal.

We both love the quiet drive and the air suspension, its feels you are on a boat ;) and floating towards your destination without the hard work!

But to your question of maintenance and available service stations, that is another story. Maintenance is more expensive for a Diesel however I only need one oil change a year. Our mileage is about 7 MPG, Diesel is more expensive then gas at the moment but that can change anytime.

Everything is bigger in and around a class A the main reason we choose it in combination with the floor-plan. Although we are not full timing (yet) Before we bought this RV we looked at TT, 5th wheels, and class C and decided that we wanted space and comfortable ride. We now also tow one of our cars (4 wheel down) another learning curve but not that difficult.

Good luck with your choices, everyone has different wants and needs, these are personal choices with budget considerations.
« Last Edit: August 08, 2016, 10:00:43 PM by DutchEagle »
Klaas (Retired 9/1/2016) & Eileen (+dog Bailey)
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2005 Winnebago Vectra 40FD
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driftless shifter

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Re: Why did you? Class A v Class C
« Reply #10 on: August 08, 2016, 11:55:18 PM »
Full time for us meant nothing smaller than a 34' class A. Bedroom is private, bathroom is private and bigger, dinette is a desk. No slides to break although we kinda wish we had em now, easy to live without however. Class A of 34' is a good compromise between too damn big and too damn small, for foul weather. Plenty of storage. I found the engine easier to work on in a class A as the you can remove the wheel and inner fender easily and have full access to either side of the engine, while sitting on a milk crate. Ablessing if/when you have to replace cracked exhaust manifolds. This task would be a bear on a van cutaway based RV. Brakes are the same only bigger and needing bigger wrenches and auxiliary components are all pretty much the same as any old V8 rear drive car or truck. A class A is easy to drive if you are comfortable driving a box truck You will have to pay attention to where your right hand side is as most hug the gutter at first. Just constantly remind yourself to crowd the left side of your lane until you get used to sitting above the left front wheel instead of inside of it's track. The view is spectacular through the huge windshield. I drove it through a snow flurry, at night, when we first got it. It was like being on the starship Enterprise at warp speed, the snowflakes being the stars whizzing by.

Bill
Bill & Nan
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93 bounder 34, chevy chassis
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JDOnTheGo

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Re: Why did you? Class A v Class C
« Reply #11 on: August 09, 2016, 06:35:26 AM »
If you think you have something to add to my situation I'd love to hear it.

This is mostly an opinion thread which makes adding anything truly useful very difficult.  I guess maybe the only useful thing I can add is; instead of 'buying into' other people's opinions, go to some RV lots and get some experience with the options so you can form your own and see what you like and don't like.  A couple of short test drives will likely tell you a lot about how the coaches in your desired size range drive/handle.  Don't put a lot of stock in what the sales person says, they are trying to get your money.

I'd suggest going to RV shows and spending time in every option that is of interest/in budget.  Imagine living in it. Imagine where you will put all your stuff. Imagine cooking, watching TV, being stuck in it for 2-3 days in a row (cause it is cold and raining outside). Stand in the shower (is it big enough), sit on the toilet, lay on the bed.  How much work is it to setup and teardown (for camping)?  Some folks don't mind using leveling boards, getting in and out, pulling back and forth, checking level every time, etc.  I push a button and the coach is leveled.  Obviously, there is a cost for convenience. Only you can decide if that cost is worth it to you.

Unless you are planning to do a lot of driving, mileage isn't that big of a deal.  Most rigs of similar size/weight are going to offer pretty similar mileage.  It seems like they are all in the 8 MPG range.

The "easy to repair" is an interesting consideration.  In some ways, it sounds like planning to fail.  However; it is a reality so risk mitigation is the way to deal with it.  Instead of driving until it fails and hoping someone nearby can repair it, have preventative maintenance performed regularly so the odds of a breakdown are minimized (for example).
JD - Full timer out west
1998 MCI 102 EL3 Revolution | 2010 Wrangler (daJeep) | 650 Watts Solar
My Adventures

Ernie n Tara

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Re: Why did you? Class A v Class C
« Reply #12 on: August 09, 2016, 02:35:52 PM »
With regard to "easy to repair" I'll suggest that we need to consider what we are talking about. Granted a dp is more expensive to repair, but which is more likely to need repair; a van chassis designed for perhaps 100, 000 miles over five years compared to a diesel truck chassis designed to go 500 miles per day (750, 000 miles in five years). I'll take my chances on the diesel every time! The van is a class C; the DP obviously a big class A, and the gas class A probably falls about in the middle; the chassis is truck while the engine/transmission are high end pickup.

As far as the house goes,  I'd expect a lot of similarity with you getting what you pay for! Not an unusual circumstance!

Ernie
Ernie 'n Tara

2011 Winn Journey 34y
2012 Jeep Rubicon - Dozer (orange - kinda)
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blw2

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Re: Why did you? Class A v Class C
« Reply #13 on: August 09, 2016, 03:34:00 PM »
With regard to "easy to repair" I'll suggest that we need to consider what we are talking about. Granted a dp is more expensive to repair, but which is more likely to need repair; a van chassis designed for perhaps 100, 000 miles over five years compared to a diesel truck chassis designed to go 500 miles per day (750, 000 miles in five years). I'll take my chances on the diesel every time! The van is a class C; the DP obviously a big class A, and the gas class A probably falls about in the middle; the chassis is truck while the engine/transmission are high end pickup.

As far as the house goes,  I'd expect a lot of similarity with you getting what you pay for! Not an unusual circumstance!

Ernie

good points
BUT
what if you are only driving a small fraction of that per year (or less)on that chassis designed for near constant use?
Brad (DW + 3 kids)
13 Thor Chateau 31L Class C on Ford E-450
'06 Silverado
'05 Rockwood Freedom 1910 (5-1/2 years)
former tent campers

Skippityboo

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Re: Why did you? Class A v Class C
« Reply #14 on: August 10, 2016, 01:25:06 PM »
Thank you DutchEagle.

Yes, If I did go with a Class A it would be a Diesel Engine.

Mainly because when I full timed in a 38f Class A Gas model, finding a gas station we could get into was extremely difficult (doable, but a real PITA).

At least Diesel pumps are made for bigger vehicle usually.

My plan is to travel every 2 weeks or so (more if i don't enjoy the area I'm in). Fill my tank and drive to my next location (a tank full away "give or take").

I'm really wanting to taking my journey slowly and really explore. (I'll be taking a scooter rather than a toad)

Thank you very much more your thoughts, I'm certainly starting to open up to the option, and will research cost and floor plans over the next few days.

 
2006 Ford F-250 (Diesel)
2015 Rockwood Mini Lite
Yorkies x 2

Skippityboo

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Re: Why did you? Class A v Class C
« Reply #15 on: August 10, 2016, 01:30:52 PM »
Thank you Driftless Shifter (or should I call you Captain Kirk?  ;D )

With a class A I may actually consider going a few feet longer than my original 30 foot length.... I'll certainly start researching floor plans of class A's

I guess my biggest fear was driving a class A, however, both here and in life, everyone tells me a class A is just as easy if not easier to drive .... so Thank you for opening up that line of thought for me.

2006 Ford F-250 (Diesel)
2015 Rockwood Mini Lite
Yorkies x 2

Skippityboo

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Re: Why did you? Class A v Class C
« Reply #16 on: August 10, 2016, 02:00:04 PM »
JFNM

Ive done the RV shows, I visit different lots each weekend, and I have full timed before but more as a passenger rather than a owner/driver so I'm not familiar with driving a bigger rig or engines in the slightest, and this time its my own personal money on the line, so I plan to research, and research hard  ;)

Test driving is an option, but in Illinois you need a special license to drive a rig over a certain weight  (*note to me : remind yourself what that weight is), I'm not opposed to taking that driving test, but as I haven't driven something like that yet .... I don't want to waste my time if I discover its not for me earlier on.

As I mentioned above, I don't plan to do a whole lot of driving, about the distance of a tank of gas every two weeks or so (obviously everything is fluid and I don't know the size of my future gas tank will be yet .... but I hope it gives you an idea of how much I'm looking to travel).

Maybe I just had bad luck with my last rig, but I spent a lot more nights in hotels than I would of liked to on my last trip (2010) with two dogs, that was not fun.

Finding places that could repair an RV was difficult, RV shops were booked solid all summer long, truck repair places wouldn't take us, and all in all It added a lot of stress and unknown being stuck in areas for a month at a time trying to find someone to repair our rig.

(These were all issues that needed to be attended to by a professional and regular maintenance would not of spotted these issues, not simple work)

Of course I plan to keep my truck maintained and serviced regular (I get my car checked twice a year as it is and its only a 2009), Thats something I can plan for and book in advance.

Now, yes, I've learnt a lot from that experience, and I know how to avoid some issues, and fix others, .... Finding a rig that is easy to be repaired (like say a Ford engine, because everyone has a ford garage in their city) and doesn't have a ton of obscure parts that take 3 weeks to ship to me is a preferred quality of my new rig.

I don't have a home to go back to if things take months to fix.

Thank you very much for your thoughts, Its good to see what others with experience think is important /not important, I'm fully aware I could be worrying over the wrong areas.

So now ... should I get a blue colour scheme or a pink one?   ;D ;D ;D ;D
2006 Ford F-250 (Diesel)
2015 Rockwood Mini Lite
Yorkies x 2

ArdraF

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Re: Why did you? Class A v Class C
« Reply #17 on: August 10, 2016, 02:01:17 PM »
Quote
everyone tells me a class A is just as easy if not easier to drive

They're correct.  We've owned three Class Cs and two Class As.  I prefer driving the As.  Very easy once you get used to it which probably takes an hour or less.  Once you see a floor plan you like don't hesitate to ask for a test drive where you'll learn first-hand how easy it is.

ArdraF
ArdraF
:D :D

Skippityboo

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Re: Why did you? Class A v Class C
« Reply #18 on: August 10, 2016, 02:06:03 PM »
While money is always a consideration, cost is not the highest factor when I'm looking into what rig to buy, reliability is.

What I think I've learnt most from this thread is that a Class A isn't as scary to drive as I thought, and certainly should now be considered.

Thank you Ernie n Tara
2006 Ford F-250 (Diesel)
2015 Rockwood Mini Lite
Yorkies x 2

Skippityboo

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Re: Why did you? Class A v Class C
« Reply #19 on: August 10, 2016, 02:07:48 PM »
*beams*

Thank you ArdraF

They're correct.  We've owned three Class Cs and two Class As.  I prefer driving the As.  Very easy once you get used to it which probably takes an hour or less.  Once you see a floor plan you like don't hesitate to ask for a test drive where you'll learn first-hand how easy it is.

ArdraF
2006 Ford F-250 (Diesel)
2015 Rockwood Mini Lite
Yorkies x 2

JudyJB

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Re: Why did you? Class A v Class C
« Reply #20 on: August 12, 2016, 12:27:18 AM »
I went with a 32' Class C because it was plenty big enough for me and still is because I travel solo.  It was also very easy for me to drive.  My biggest problem is being only 5'1" tall.  I test drove a 36' Class A and in order to reach the pedals, I had to push the seat so far forward that the steering wheel was shoved into my stomach.  Ouch!  Also, I could not reach the visors to adjust them.  I figured driving with my handicap grabber to adjust the visors and radio was not a good option.

In addition, I wanted the option to sleep my kids and grandkids and most As are really made for a couple, not a grandma plus family.   

I really am happy with what I have, especially because it has two big slides.  However, it would be nice to have a larger cargo carrying capacity and a fancier driver's seat, plus some other luxury items in the cab and some better interior finishes.  (The bigger cargo carrying capacity is to be able to carry a full tank of fresh water with me and not worry about the weight of that and un-dumped waste tanks.)  If I ever win or inherit some serious money, I might try trading this one in for a small A--maybe 34'. I think I would have to work with the manufacturer to get adjustable pedals or pedal extensions and/or other modifications because of my height and arm length.  I used to have a minivan with adjustable pedals and a nice power seat and movable steering wheel that enabled me to reach things, so I don't know why Class A manufacturers assume every driver is a 5'10" man.  >:(

Note: I have to buy new because of allergies to pets and cigarette smoke. 
« Last Edit: August 12, 2016, 12:36:15 AM by JudyJB »
Full-timing for over five years in a
2012 Fleetwood Tioga Ranger 31N

Skippityboo

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Re: Why did you? Class A v Class C
« Reply #21 on: August 12, 2016, 11:46:46 PM »
JudyJB,

Thank you, I too plan to live alone and I'm only 5 foot myself so your insights are extremely helpful.

I'm heading over to the dealers today and I'll be certainly sitting in the drivers seat after your comments.

I don't have kids thou, so I'm hoping to use the over head bunk (if I buy a Class C) for extra storage.

Thank you - very helpful
2006 Ford F-250 (Diesel)
2015 Rockwood Mini Lite
Yorkies x 2

WILDEBILL308

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Re: Why did you? Class A v Class C
« Reply #22 on: August 13, 2016, 12:10:24 AM »
I would go test drive as many as you can. When test driving don't just drive around the block on city streets. Get on the freeway and drive for 10-20 miles and drive on other road surfaces and get a feel for how it rides and drives.
Bill
2003 Bounder 38N
300 HP 5.9 Cummins
Allison 3000MH Trans.
Towing 2014 Honda CRV
Home base Fort Worth, Texas
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn in no other way.
-Mark Twain-

blw2

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Re: Why did you? Class A v Class C
« Reply #23 on: August 13, 2016, 12:08:09 PM »
I was thinking about this thread yesterday, while looking at the thor specific forum.  There seems to be a slug of posts lately about folks having widshield wiper propblems.  Appearently some sort of QA issue perhaps now...
but anyway, that is an example of something that does give me confidence about having the class C.  All the things up front are surely much better by Ford, than the sketchy quality I see form Thor in how they put the house together....
Not a reason to not buy an A..... just a comment
Brad (DW + 3 kids)
13 Thor Chateau 31L Class C on Ford E-450
'06 Silverado
'05 Rockwood Freedom 1910 (5-1/2 years)
former tent campers

JudyJB

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Re: Why did you? Class A v Class C
« Reply #24 on: August 13, 2016, 08:16:48 PM »
Is there a thread for really short people???

Some other considerations--make sure you can reach the light switches on the ceiling.  I am able to reach them if I stand on my toes, but that is about all.  My unit has a lower light switch in the bathroom, and a couple of more easily reachable lights in the living areas, plus two over my bed.  The vent fans are a pain for us short folks.  I put one of those pillows in the one over my bed since I never use it anyway, and I can reach the one on the bathroom by standing on the step the toilet is mounted on, but the kitchen vent fan is impossible without a stool, so I seldom use it!!

Also, check out how reachable the sewer hookup is.  I have to stick part of my head into the compartment and use both hands to hook on the hose.  The water pump is located way too far for me to do anything with it.

Now some advantages of traveling solo:  1) you can use all the storage space yourself, 2) even taking a hot shower every night and washing dishes once per day, I can go 4-5 days without dumping my tanks, and 3) You get to make ALL of the decisions yourself!!

Also, if you do use the front bunk area for storage, make sure you get cabinets made so that everything is secured when you drive or you will have to pick up stuff from the floor at every stop! 
« Last Edit: August 13, 2016, 08:18:42 PM by JudyJB »
Full-timing for over five years in a
2012 Fleetwood Tioga Ranger 31N

Stephen S.

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Re: Why did you? Class A v Class C
« Reply #25 on: August 13, 2016, 09:17:52 PM »
I'll just note here something about the road handling of my setup.
24' Class C with about 350 lbs of motorcycle and carrier on the back end.

The bike&carrier, along with full or even half full tanks, lifts the front end a bit. Steering and braking are affected some, especially on wet pavement. With a longer RV like the 30' range you are looking at the lift on the front wheels would be greater.

While I don't feel that it is dangerous, it is something I have to keep in mind while driving.
So I'm going to be looking for a medium/short Class A DP when I'm ready to trade up.
The rear axle is closer to the back end keeping the bike and rack from lifting weight off the front wheels. It will also allow for more towing capacity, allowing me to pull an enclosed trailer.

I doubt my rig will get close to HeuyPilotVN status, but.... the one thing I would miss while full-timing is a garage to putter around in.
Stephen S.
===============
'99 Winnebago Chalet
2002 VW Beetle
2007 Yamaha TW200
Home town: Mableton, GA

herekittykitty

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Re: Why did you? Class A v Class C
« Reply #26 on: August 21, 2016, 06:34:05 PM »
Easy: Got in the cockpit of a class A, looked out through the windshield, and said, There is NO WAY I am driving this thing.  ;D Ex-husband did, too.

I live alone in my class C. Was a good choice for me.

It's true that the cockpit and seats are wasted space, but once parked they can be used to store things. My vacuum cleaner lives there.
Karen and Teddy-the-Kitty
Mostly stationary for now in a 32' Class C (2013 Winnebago Access Premier)

Skippityboo

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Re: Why did you? Class A v Class C
« Reply #27 on: August 23, 2016, 08:36:12 PM »
Just to keep you guys up to date.

I did finally test drive a Class A.

I found it sooper easy to drive, and would have no problems buying a Class A, if the right unit comes along.

However, JudyJB, I kept you in mind, and I have sat in the drivers seat of every Class A I've looked at since, and it seems hit or miss to if I can fully push down on the break or that if the steering column knocks against my knee (another safety hazard in my book).

So while I haven't totally ruled out Class A's, Its been rare I have found one that I can seat in with the upmost confidence.

If it gets closer to my deadline, then I'm aware I can get the seat moved  .... but I still have some time yet to find the "perfect RV" before I have to resort to that type of modification.

Srs713

Thank you for your thoughts re the carrying of the motorcycle .... I'll bear that in mind!

BLW2

That was one of my arguments for a Class C .... not so much that I think Ford are a better car company than any other, but that if the windscreen wipers (or whatever) does break, every town has a ford garage and parts are much easier to find & replace.
2006 Ford F-250 (Diesel)
2015 Rockwood Mini Lite
Yorkies x 2

WILDEBILL308

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Re: Why did you? Class A v Class C
« Reply #28 on: August 23, 2016, 11:56:18 PM »
My seat is completely adjustable electrically, height and front to back and tilt. You need to drive some more coaches and the ones you just sit in try the seat and wheel adjustments.
Buying a Ford just because there are a lot of Ford dealers doesn't always help you. There are a lot of Ford dealers (unless they have a heavy truck shop) won't work on Motorhomes. There are just as many places that work on big rigs that can work on Motorhomes. This is why I have Coach Net when traveling it provides a concierge service to help you find a technician to come to you or a facility that you can be towed to for repair.
Bill
2003 Bounder 38N
300 HP 5.9 Cummins
Allison 3000MH Trans.
Towing 2014 Honda CRV
Home base Fort Worth, Texas
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn in no other way.
-Mark Twain-

herekittykitty

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  • Birch Bay, WA
Re: Why did you? Class A v Class C
« Reply #29 on: August 24, 2016, 02:52:01 AM »
While you're pondering the possibilities... there is one other thing to mention: Those enormous class A windshields that blast you with unavoidable sun while you're driving. I'll let devoted class A drivers tell you how they handle that (have no idea).
Karen and Teddy-the-Kitty
Mostly stationary for now in a 32' Class C (2013 Winnebago Access Premier)

 

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