The RV Forum Community

RVing message boards => General Discussion => Topic started by: RedandSilver on February 03, 2017, 02:50:08 PM

Title: Flat tire questions
Post by: RedandSilver on February 03, 2017, 02:50:08 PM
I just want to know this for IF it happens to me what I might expect.

So IF you have Coachnet or GoodSams and you have a flat.
Is the total cost to replace a tire covered?

Now I assume a New tire is not covered.

So How bad did you get taken and how much did you have to pay for a new tire when on the side of the road?
Did you pay Cash, Credit or Debit?    Did you wait more then a hour?  Two hours? for service.
Did you have a choice on the tire brand they brought out to you? 
Did you end up talking to the Wrecker Service directly OR was it all handled through CN or GS?

Did they change the tire right there and then?
Did you get a tow (on a flat bed?) to their facility to have it changed there?
Did they try and up sell you or tell you that a set was the best way to go vs. buying only 1 tire?
Did an inexperienced person show up to do the work, and leave you unsatisfied with the results?

Has anyone ever carried a tire (in their basement or on the roof or in a trailer) so as not to pay a huge amount because you had no choice?
Reason I ask is, what if the Service that came out DIDN'T have the size tire you needed - but if you had one they could have changed it?

Sorry for the dumb questions but IF I knew the answers I wouldn't ask them.
I believe that preparedness is usually equal to the rate of success.   ;D
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: Gary RV_Wizard on February 03, 2017, 04:11:23 PM
What is covered is the road service call for a tire shop guy to come out to you, and to install your spare IF you have one. Any tire repairs or new tire you may require are your responsibility.  Alternatively, you can be towed in for tire service at no additional cost, but you still have to pay for any repairs or labor once you arrive.

Obviously, if you need a new tire your choices are limited to what is available. That may be just one of a certain size, or maybe even zero if its 10 pm on Sunday night in the hinterlands. There is no predicting what is available when you need it. And you don't have any negotiating room either, unless you don't mind sitting on the roadside and waiting for somebody else to bring a tire from East Doofu (also at your expense).

Long ago I decided to simply not worry about it. It's gonna be expensive if it ever happens, and I'll end up paying extra for the convenience of not buying and toting around an expensive spare for years and never needing it.
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: grashley on February 03, 2017, 05:31:41 PM
Long ago I decided to simply not worry about it. It's gonna be expensive if it ever happens, and I'll end up paying extra for the convenience of not buying and toting around an expensive spare for years and never needing it.

Not only that, but if get new tires when needed, the chance of a flat is greatly reduced, and the spare will age even if never put in service, and will need replaced when you buy new tires as well.  I suspect the cost of buying those unused spares may far exceed the inflated cost of one IF or when you need it.
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: John From Detroit on February 03, 2017, 07:24:16 PM
You pay for tire and balancing, they cover labor and delivery.
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: RedandSilver on February 03, 2017, 10:35:11 PM
Thanks for the replies - Keep them coming.
For now I will forget the idea of carrying a spare tire.

So no one has ever had a tire replaced on the road?

I would like to know how much it cost, and how you paid for it.
Not every person I come into contact with would I feel comfortable giving my CC to.
So I might try and keep enough cash on board, IF I felt that was a better choice then handing over a CC etc.

Did they require money (payment) upfront before they started working on wheel removal and tire replacement?

Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: NY_Dutch on February 04, 2017, 07:07:12 AM
The one time I needed a replacement tire while on the road, the tire service that Coach-Net contacted called me to verify my location and tire details. He didn't have the correct size new tire in stock, but said he could get one from another dealer. He also offered me a used tire for $50 including mounting that he felt was in good enough condition to use for at least a few thousand miles so I could arrange for a new tire of my choice. I took him up on the used tire deal and about 45 minutes later the tech arrived and made the swap. He swiped my credit card on one of those smart phone attachments to pay the $50. All other charges were covered by Coach-Net. The response time for any road service is a variable that depends on the travel distance required, the call volume being handled, and the priority of the call, so trying to use that as a measure of ERS value is relatively futile.
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: scottydl on February 04, 2017, 08:25:37 AM
Not every person I come into contact with would I feel comfortable giving my CC to.
So I might try and keep enough cash on board, IF I felt that was a better choice then handing over a CC etc.

I'd be complete opposite in that situation.  Credit cards (or debit cards run as credit) have complete fraud coverage through Visa/MC/etc.  You would not be liable for any charges made, that you did not agree to (such as if you CC number was stolen-- I assume that's your concern).  In a roadside breakdown, in a strange place far away from home, dealing with a unfamiliar service provider... I'd much rather put the "risk" on my credit card than be dealing with several hundred dollars in cash.

And this is coming from a guy who pays cash (actual paper money) for nearly everything, from repeated monthly expenses to major purchases (cars, RV's) that I save up for.  Sometimes the convenience/security aspects of electronic payment are worthwhile.
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: ronster on February 04, 2017, 08:41:25 AM
I am one of those guys that would come out to your motorhome when you have a flat.The problem with motorhomes is RV tires are often off sized from truck tires.Usually not worth stocking.Smaller companies do much of the road service,some care about you,some dont.Ive worked for both over the years.Carrying an unmounted spare will keep you from getting screwed. Iwill get flamed fot this comment but changing to a truck size when you buy 6 tires will save you grief.Of course checking tires often[tire pressure monitor best] or using a gauge or heat gun. 19.5s are truck tires and are easy to get.The new tire in the belly of your motorhome dosent age as quickly with no sun on it,will last longer than the 7 year life of most tires.I carry a mounted spare,a Sampson tire only cost 200,less than half of the Firestones dealer put on before I bought it.Your usage of your motor home also comes into the picture,weekend warrior,150 miles from home,tier 2,3 tires are fine for you,Full timer,30k a year go with the best.Just my opinion !
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: Gary RV_Wizard on February 04, 2017, 09:10:49 AM
I have to agree with ronster about changing to a more common tire size where practical (and it often is). Sizes in frequent commercial use will often be lower-priced to begin with, and much easier/cheaper to get in an emergency. I changed my rear tires from 295/80R22.5 to 11R22.5 for those reasons, but the 11R lacked the necessary load capacity for use on the front. I considered 12R22.5 for the front, but there seemed to be little advantage in that size.

As for carrying an unmounted spare, to me that is strictly a space consideration. We carried a lot of recreational gear and our bays were always chuck-full, so a carrying a spare meant leaving other things home. A LOT of other things. The 295/80 is over 41" in diameter and near 12" thick.


In 16 years of motorhome travel, about 115k miles, we had one flat tire. And that turned out to be a failed rubber valve stem rather than an actual tire problem. Did not do as well with out 5W trailers - lost 3 of  4 tires in a 3 day period and still not sure why.  I know the pressure was OK, but at that time I had not educated myself well enough to assess other reasons why the tires could have failed. Still, that was essentially one event in 5 years of trailer travel.
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: RedandSilver on February 04, 2017, 10:57:23 AM
I agree that carrying a spare - there are pros and cons.

When I pull my trailer I could easily take an unmounted spare tire with me.
I know this Summer I will take a 3 week trip and have my trailer.  After that I'm not sure
how much I will or will not pull a trailer, unless I was snowbirding and then I will have it for sure. 
A tire would take up a lot of space in the basement and moving it between the MH and trailer, would be some work for sure.


I have never heard of a 11R or a 12R22.5 can anyone explain?       The tires I have now are 275/70/22.5 - Is that a common size?

I'm thinking this is going to be catch22 in that,
IF I don't have a spare I will (have) needed one - but IF I have a spare I will never need it.  Decisions, decisions.......

What are your thoughts on getting a used tire?  For a spare that may or may not ever be used?
I would agree that if kept out of sunlight etc it should last longer than 7 years - and if it was used just to get
me home from where ever, then I could replace it (or more) tires as needed.  Isn't that the idea of a spare?
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: Alfa38User on February 04, 2017, 11:32:43 AM
Another thought.... are you able to manhandle the weight and size of a 22.5" wheel and tire along with the torque needed for the wheel nuts?
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: RedandSilver on February 04, 2017, 12:18:42 PM
Another thought.... are you able to manhandle the weight and size of a 22.5" wheel and tire along with the torque needed for the wheel nuts?

I have no intentions of carrying a wheel mounted with a tire  - just a tire IF I go this route.
I have heard a tire weighs about 140lbs.  Good thing it's round and can roll.
I have a ramp door on my trailer so I don't think it would be a problem for the most part.
Beside I would probably let the guy that came to replace it man-handle it if for some reason I couldn't.

I also would NOT plan on removing the wheel from the MH as I don't plan on carrying a jack big enough to lift the MH.
Again the Guy that came would have all that stuff and if he does it for a living should be better at it then I will ever be.  JMO.
A man has to know his limits, right?
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: RVRAC on February 04, 2017, 01:27:36 PM
I agree with Gary and others that carry a spare tire in a motorhome might be a pain.  However, in a TT or FW it is good idea if you have the right set up.  My FW has one under the chassis.  Last year when I needed one of the tires replaced while I was in the campground, I called for road service.  The guy came, took it off, replaced the needed tire, put back the bad one under the chassis, and left.  I paid nothing.
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: Old_Crow on February 05, 2017, 07:11:48 AM
My coach has a spare hung under the rear of the coach like a pickup truck.  Unfortunately it didn't come with a jack or lug wrench.  I've added a jack, because I had a brand new 12t sitting in the shop at home, but have yet to acquire a lug wrench.
Now you guys have me thinking about getting rid of the spare altogether.  I've got a portable dog pen that won't fit in any of my storage bays that I could carry in the freed up space with some minor fabrication.
I do have GS roadside service.
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: scottydl on February 05, 2017, 07:56:08 AM
For a smaller gas rig (smaller than a DP anyway) with 19.5" or 16" LT tires, I think it's pretty darn handy to have a spare on board.  I know I was glad I had one when a tire blew on my 1994 gas MH during a road trip in 2010... although upon removing the spare from its storage spot, I was terrified to learn that it was original to the rig and manufactured in 1993!  But, the rubber had rarely seen the light of day and had never held a pound of weight, and somehow it got me home.  I bought two new matching tires the next day, installed them together (1 to replace the blown tire, and 1 to match on the other side), and the removed "good" tire became my new spare.

I have no doubt you'd end up paying through the nose (full retail price or more) if roadside had to bring you a spare.  Plus then you have issue of 1 tire being different from the other 5 (or 7 if you have w tag axle) that has to be worked out later.
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: Old_Crow on February 05, 2017, 08:28:11 AM
Yeah, you're right, I'll probably keep the spare and get a lug wrench.  I'm just pissed about the dog pen.  This coach is 9 feet longer than my previous one, but, because of the saddlebag style storage on the slide, I don't have the big pass though storage to take that dog pen like I did on the 29' '89 Sportscoach I just got rid of.
Note to self:  Next coach with a slide will not have saddlebag storage bins.
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: John From Detroit on February 05, 2017, 11:30:22 AM
One other thing about a spare.. I've seen some spares go bad faster than the tire they were a "Spare" for..  Tires, specifically those exposed to the sun, like to be rolling, rolling, rolling, keep those tires rolling, bring protective oils out of the tire..   Spares, even covered, get enough UV to bother them, but no "rolling"

As for the 12T Jack...   Had a guy having problems centering his 5ER on the leveling boards.. I told him get it level then we will pick it up and move the boards... I can only pick up 12 tons...... You can imagine the look I got... Finally he got it level, I got the 12 ton air/hydraulic jack and compressor... and then he understood... I was not exaggerating.   I really could pick up 12 tons, with just two fingers and proper preparation.
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: garmp on February 05, 2017, 03:12:44 PM
RVRAC: What Roadside Assist do you have? & how happy are you with it?
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: RedandSilver on February 05, 2017, 05:33:47 PM
Thanks for the replies - Keep them coming.
For now I will forget the idea of carrying a spare tire.

So no one has ever had a tire replaced on the road?

I would like to know how much it cost, and how you paid for it.
Not every person I come into contact with would I feel comfortable giving my CC to.
So I might try and keep enough cash on board, IF I felt that was a better choice then handing over a CC etc.

Did they require money (payment) upfront before they started working on wheel removal and tire replacement?


Thanks everyone for your posts.

BUT I'm beginning to think that this might be an issue that I should stop worrying about BECAUSE

NOT ONE person has said that they needed a tire replaced on the road AND no one quoted a price they paid for
a replacement tire - so do I assume that no one has ever had a flat (particularly on a Class A DP) and a tire replaced on the road?


Maybe the people on this forum are really lucky and never had a problem. That would be nice.   :) :) :)

Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: NY_Dutch on February 05, 2017, 07:24:29 PM
I guess my post #5 doesn't qualify as a tire replacement mention. Or I'm not considered a "person"...  ::) :o :P
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: RedandSilver on February 05, 2017, 08:09:27 PM
I guess my post #5 doesn't qualify as a tire replacement mention. Or I'm not considered a "person"...  ::) :o :P

You are a person and I appreciate your reply. 

I guess because you got a used tire for $50 that I didn't consider that a new tire or realistic amount of what I would have to pay
IF I needed a tire on the road.  Yes it would be nice to get a deal - but that is something that I would never plan on.

I think the PO said when he replaced the tires 2 years ago he paid $3200 for the 6 of them.  So a little over $500 each.
I was looking for someone to tell me the worst case (actual) price they had to pay for one on the road.  Buying them
one at a time on the road - is it going to be $800 or more for one?  And what are the chances of them having the same brand I have?  IDK.



Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: dpickard on February 05, 2017, 09:14:41 PM
Three motorhomes and 14 years ago, enroute to Florida from NC to trade that particular Class A MH, I had a right front tire explode at 65mph at 1:50AM on a lonely stretch of I-95 in SC about 12 miles from the Georgia line. Sounded like a BOMB went off and I wrestled this thing like a bear to keep from flipping the coach. To say the least that was one WILD ride!

Thankfully, I had the presence of mind NOT to hit the brakes at that speed...just let off the gas and let it slow enough on it's own until I could safely use the brakes and pull off to the side of the road.

Called CoachNet. They sent a guy out about 90 minutes later and he didn't have the right size tire but had one that was close enough; and by that time, my nerves were so frazzled I didn't care WHAT size it was as long as it had air in it.

I paid $290 for the new tire on the side of the highway (which to me was the epitome of highway robbery) and I was a nervous wreck until I pulled into Lazydays and got parked.

That was when I saw that a steel piece of the wheel well had been blown back and was pressing in on my propane tank. I almost fainted at the sight of what I had been rolling down the road with; oblivious and happily daydreaming of the prospect of my new to me diesel pusher.

I have never had a tire incident since. That experience was enough to last a lifetime!

Dianne







Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: DearMissMermaid on February 05, 2017, 09:34:17 PM
I had a flat!

They had cut a sharp rut into the road during construction. It pinched my inside back tire, ripped the tread off and jammed it between the duallys in my Class C motorhome. The tire never lost air, but with the tread jammed in there between the tires, I wasn't going anywhere.

I called for service through Progressive, it's included in my insurance. Idiot on phone kept calling regular tow trucks rather than truck or RV truck. Finally convinced them to send correct operator but at one point had to get insurance agent to intervene.

My spare used to be mounted on rear of RV with a sun cover over it. However, I had moved it to my basement and it weighs a ton. I carry a unique bicycle on back between my cargo carrier and the bumper, I needed the extra room the spare tire was hogging to make it easier for me to haul my beloved bicycle around. I did not want to part with my spare because I travel in remote locations.

I emptied out basement as it was in far corner, but left tire in there. Nice man with dirty clothes (hard worker!) showed up and on side of interstate he expertly jacked me up, retrieved spare, put it on, reloaded bad tire into basement and we were on our way. He had to remove both rear dual tires to unjam the stuck tread. Then put spare and other tire back on again.

While we were waiting for him to arrive, we ran generator, made lunch. At one point idiot on phone told me to make my own arrangements and get reimbursement for service. I called insurance agent who said yes they would reimburse, then I asked her to look up tow company for me, she got  their flunky yahoo on the phone who was supposed to arrange this to start with. Suddenly things started happening.

I did not pay a dime.

Later I went to buy new tires, I already had 3 new, and bought 3 more new. Discovered my spare was 20 years old! Bought a used but good tire as a spare, stored back in basement again in far hard to reach corner. Also realized that tire well had a big split in it, which opened up to a cabinet under the fridge. Insurance paid for those damages too, and I got that fixed.

Having a flat is NO fun, but having extra gas, since I never drop below a half tank so in the event of an emergency, I can run generator. In this case I did need the generator as it was 90 effing degrees. Also I had tank of water, so we could flush and wash and make lunch and so on. So glad I opted to keep my spare.

If you can carry a spare do it. Otherwise they have to tow you off to somewhere to get a tire.

I've been towed too, but not because of flat tire.

Plan for the worst and hope for the best!
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: NY_Dutch on February 06, 2017, 09:04:15 AM
You are a person and I appreciate your reply. 

I guess because you got a used tire for $50 that I didn't consider that a new tire or realistic amount of what I would have to pay
IF I needed a tire on the road.  Yes it would be nice to get a deal - but that is something that I would never plan on.

I think the PO said when he replaced the tires 2 years ago he paid $3200 for the 6 of them.  So a little over $500 each.
I was looking for someone to tell me the worst case (actual) price they had to pay for one on the road.  Buying them
one at a time on the road - is it going to be $800 or more for one?  And what are the chances of them having the same brand I have?  IDK.

The price I was quoted for a new tire (same brand as I had) was about $50 higher than I found online. I didn't think that was way out of line under the circumstances, but I opted for the used tire so I could shop for a deal to replace all six tires at my convenience.
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: RedandSilver on February 06, 2017, 12:42:11 PM
The price I was quoted for a new tire (same brand as I had) was about $50 higher than I found online. I didn't think that was way out of line under the circumstances, but I opted for the used tire so I could shop for a deal to replace all six tires at my convenience.

That brings up another question.

Where do you buy your tires online?  Do they carry tires for Class A MH's?  Is shipping outrageous?
And IF I wanted one for a spare would they ship it to my home vs. a dealer which is where I would assume many are sent to.

AND:

How important is it to get the exact same tire size and make?  I assume that size would be more important then make.
Would you buy a cheaper tire for a spare not knowing if you were ever going to use it?  Just something to get you home or to a
Tire shop? 

Maybe you can tell I'm still on the fence about whether or not to carry a spare.  I see mostly pros.  The biggest con would be
buying something that you never used and then throwing it away. 
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: Gary RV_Wizard on February 06, 2017, 01:46:45 PM
I've read re-ports of people paying $600-$800 for a tire brought by a road service, but without specifics about tire size & brand. Or the situation. Heck, $800+ is the going rate for many of the larger size Michelin's or Goodyear G670 that are used on many big DP's.  The key is you aren't going to be paying a discount store price, nor do you get to choose the brand in most cases. You have to take what is available and pay the asking price. Road service companies are probably going to charge you full retail price.


Quote
I have never heard of a 11R or a 12R22.5 can anyone explain?   

 
How to explain a tire size?  It's one of the several standard tire sizing methods. The first number refers to the tread width in inches and the last is the wheel diameter. The tire profile (aspect ratio) isn't stated in the size label but is approximately .85. That means a 11R22.5 would roughly be a 280/85R22.5 if converted to the metric sizing system.  But that doesn't mean the load capacity will be identical, because the size also conforms to a different construction standard. If you look into the detailed specs, though, you will find values such as rolling radius, revolutions/mile, section width, and load capacity and determine if this size will suit your vehicle's needs or not.  11R22.5 is a fairly common size on semi-trailers and some trucking fleets have standardized on them where the specs are appropriate. A 12R is a convenient one step up form that when grater loading is needed. Physical size-wise, the 11R neatly replaces a 295/80R22.5, but has a lower load rating. The 12R has a similar load rating toa 295/80, but is a bit wider and taller.


Quote
The tires I have now are 275/70/22.5 - Is that a common size?

I don't have statistics, but I think it is fairly common, used on a number of motorhomes and some commercial trucks & and semi-trailers.

What sizes are "common" can vary by region. If a big regional fleet uses a size extensively, many major tire shops in the area will likely have a few on hand. But tires commonly found on city transit buses probably won't be readily available in farm country.
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: scottydl on February 06, 2017, 05:18:36 PM
Where do you buy your tires online?  Do they carry tires for Class A MH's?  Is shipping outrageous?
And IF I wanted one for a spare would they ship it to my home vs. a dealer which is where I would assume many are sent to.

Best way to research this online, is to research this online.  ;)  Tirerack.com and Tires.com are good places to check for sizes, costs, and shipping estimates.  Tires.com is affiliated with the Discount Tire retail shop, if you have any of those in your area.  Even smaller tire places might still do large motorhomes, as long as the parking lot is big enough and they have portable equipment to roll out to your rig.  Anyplace online will shop wherever you tell them, whether to your house or straight to an installer.  Just work it out with the installer in advance so they know to expect the shipment.

The biggest con would be buying something that you never used and then throwing it away.

If you end up never needing the spare, that's kind of a good thing.  ;)  And you probably wouldn't need to discard/replace it for 7-10 years... will you even still own the same RV by then?  (Maybe so, just something to consider.)  The annual cost of the spare is pretty low when spread over 7-10 years.
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: DearMissMermaid on February 06, 2017, 05:53:12 PM
I mentioned in my post, that I used a 20 year old spare to get me going again!
It held air and I drove on it a few weeks until I bought new tires.

So if you keep the spare under cover, 20 years later, it can save you a ton of grief. Mine did!

However, I also mentioned in my previous post, that I bought a used tire to replace it. I was planning to keep one of my old tires as the spare since I was buying new tires, but the tire place showed me a used newer tire they had on hand they were willing to let me have cheap, so that is what I did.

I have a spare and I don't have much invested in it. They stored it in my basement inflated and ready to go. Of course any roadside service will have their own air pump.

If you can take a spare with you, by all means do. If it's outside, then invest in a spare tire cover. I had replaced my spare tire cover before I decided to move mine to the basement due to hauling my bicycle out back.

Hope this helps!


Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: scottydl on February 06, 2017, 06:22:33 PM
If you can take a spare with you, by all means do. If it's outside, then invest in a spare tire cover.

The nice thing is that these can be purchased very inexpensively now, and breathable canvas material is recommended (vs. the older style vinyl or leather covers) so that heat and moisture are not trapped up against the tire over long periods of time.  I bought a white canvas cover for my trailer's rear bumper-mounted spare for around $10.  It was marketed as parachute-type canvas, and has elastic sewn in the right places/shape to create a very snug fit but still lets water/air pass through.
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: GA_Boy on February 06, 2017, 09:02:08 PM
I use Tirerack dot com.  I got a super deal and they delivered to my home.
BTW, I simply refuse to leave home without a spare tire.  Even at my age I can still change my RV tires. Always have Jack. torque  wrench, blocks, etc to handle the job.  I carry tire repair kits also.
Marvin
https://www.tirerack.com/tires/sizes/
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: scottydl on February 07, 2017, 01:01:47 AM
Even at my age I can still change my RV tires. Always have Jack. torque  wrench, blocks, etc to handle the job.  I carry tire repair kits also.

There's always the important distinction between can I do it? and do I really want to do it? to consider also.  ;)  Heck at MY age (39 now, 29 when I started RV'ing) I can certainly change tires, but that doesn't mean I'd have a good time wrestling with a giant RV tire with 12 lug nuts.  I'd much rather let the roadside assistance guy handle that when he shows up... that's why I pay my insurance company for that extra service, after all.
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: Gary RV_Wizard on February 07, 2017, 07:27:12 AM
For Class A size tires, try https://simpletire.com/ (https://simpletire.com/)  They have good prices, but be aware that by the time you add FET, shipping, disposal fees, and local installation, there may not be much difference than what a commercial tire shop will offer.  I was always able to get a local truck tire shop to come within $10-$20 per tire and I didn't have to do anything except drive in and pay the bill after.

Discount Tire (tire.com), Tirerack, etc. don't do much with larger sizes. Nor can most Discount Tire, or Tire Discount Warehouse stores install 22+ inch tires - they don't have the equipment to mount of balance them.
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: RedandSilver on February 07, 2017, 12:39:33 PM
What is FET?

I looked up my tire (Hankook AH12 275/70R/22.5) on simpletire and it was $295.99 + 32.51 FET = 328.46.
Don't know if tax would be added to that or not.  I put in my zip code (to calculate shipping) but didn't see any numbers
change - although I didn't put it in my cart........

Is there a less expensive brand I should look at (for a spare) or is that not advised?

Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: RVRAC on February 07, 2017, 12:55:43 PM
Even at my age I can still change my RV tires. Always have Jack. torque  wrench, blocks, etc to handle the job

It seems to me that what type of towing vehicle makes a difference.  If it's a TT, FW, Class B or Class C, I can see someone changing the tire.  With a Class A it might be a whole different story. With the first group, you may change the tire in minutes rather than waiting hours for road assistance, specially if there are time constraints.  When I had a tire problem I was in a campground and not in a hurry. I waited 1 1/2 hours.  The guy replaced it in five minutes.  Although I don't have the same equipment he had, as he came with air powered tools, I could probably have done it in 10-15 minutes. But I was not in a hurry.... so I could wait.
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: kdbgoat on February 07, 2017, 12:59:32 PM
What is FET?

Federal Excise Tax
https://taxmap.ntis.gov/taxmap/pubs/p510-037.htm
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: scottydl on February 07, 2017, 02:48:55 PM
Even at my age I can still change my RV tires. Always have Jack. torque  wrench, blocks, etc to handle the job

It seems to me that what type of towing vehicle makes a difference.  If it's a TT, FW, Class B or Class C, I can see someone changing the tire.  With a Class A it might be a whole different story. With the first group, you may change the tire in minutes...


In theory, yes.  That's what I thought when my tow dolly (of all things with small, manageable tires) had a highway blowout.  I had a spare dolly tire already mounted/inflated on a spare rim, a 4-way lug wrench, and figured I'd have it knocked out in 10 minutes.  I soon found out the dolly lug nuts were seized SO tight that my lug wrench "end" cracked and became useless.  I unloaded the toad, my wife loaded up the kids and drove the rest of the way home (where we were headed anyway), and I waited 2 hours for roadside assistance to arrive and change the tire in 5 minutes.  ::)
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: DearMissMermaid on February 07, 2017, 03:02:37 PM
My spare tire on the rim weighs about a hundred pounds!

Good luck manhandling that on side of interstate when it's the inside dually that went flat.

Of course the repairman did handle all this, but he had powerful equipment to help him too.

In the Caribbean I traveled with a tire repair kit and used it once too.

I do have a can of inflatable tire repair. Buy a can for truck tires. IT WORKS.

I had a leaky flat the campground.

We put the can of fix-a-flat into the tire, then drove to the tire store.

It was fully inflated and holding, but we bought a new tire anyhow. That is how I ended up with the odd 3. I had put on new front tires and was waiting for the cash for the 4 rear tires. Then I had the campground flat, I just bought one.

The guy was super busy and worked us in, but his tires were no bargain. But he did have the matching tire like the front ones.

When I got back to Florida a few months later and had the tread come off the old one, I then bought the other 3 matching tires form a tire place and the price was much better.

By the way my insurance road side service is far cheaper than AAA or Coachnet and provides basically the same services.
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: Gary RV_Wizard on February 08, 2017, 08:47:46 AM
Quote
I looked up my tire (Hankook AH12 275/70R/22.5) on simpletire and it was $295.99 + 32.51 FET = 328.46.
Don't know if tax would be added to that or not.  I put in my zip code (to calculate shipping) but didn't see any numbers
change - although I didn't put it in my cart........

When you click Calculate Shipping on Simple Tire, it inserts 2-3 lines above the button with an estimated shipping cost, but the displayed price (below the button) doesn't change. For my zip (34488), it came to $37.35 per tire.   

You have to arrange local installation (mount and balance) and the installer may collect additional state & local fees for things like tire disposal. Technically you are also liable for sales/use tax on the tire purchase price if the state has one, but few people actually declare & pay it.

Simple Tire gives you choices in multiple price ranges and the 275/70R22.5 ranges as low as $156, so yes you can buy cheaper ones. The risk with the cheap ones is primarily that quality is less consistent and warranty service harder to get if you do get a bad one. You have to make your own call on that. Hankook is an internationally recognized brand with a solid rep for quality tires.
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: RedandSilver on February 08, 2017, 01:10:43 PM

You have to arrange local installation (mount and balance) and the installer may collect additional state & local fees for things like tire disposal. Technically you are also liable for sales/use tax on the tire purchase price if the state has one, but few people actually declare & pay it.

Thanks for the info Gary.

If I only wanted a spare tire to carry JUST IN CASE then I wouldn't be taking it to a "Local" installer.

What is the FET for if you ALSO have to pay sales tax?  OH silly me they like to squeeze as much money out of us as they can, to spend
it on themselves.   I have never heard of car tires having an FET fee added on - unless it's built in and they never mention it

I'm still on the fence yet.  I may call around my local area and see if anyone has a used tire in my size.

I have to believe that the major reason for carrying a spare is so we don't get screwed and pay list price or more when out on the road.
That and if for some strange reason they didn't stock my size tire or were just out of my size, then it would save me from having to be towed,
which would take more time vs. a tire change on the side of the road and then on our way......
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: Larry N. on February 08, 2017, 03:28:58 PM
Quote
What is the FET for if you ALSO have to pay sales tax?

FET is Federal, sales tax is state...
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: RedandSilver on February 08, 2017, 05:56:03 PM
FET is Federal, sales tax is state...

How many other products do we have to pay Federal AND State taxes on?

So Why do we have to pay both on Tires?
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: NY_Dutch on February 08, 2017, 06:35:11 PM
How many other products do we have to pay Federal AND State taxes on?

So Why do we have to pay both on Tires?

Gas and diesel have both federal and state taxes.

" What is FET?"

"FET is an acronym for federal excise tax. It refers to the tax imposed by the federal government on tires used on the road with a maximum load capacity greater then 3500 pounds. Generally this applies to medium truck tires and heavy duty trailer tires."

What is FET and why do I have to pay it? (http://www.petestirestore.com/What-is-FET-and-why-do-I-have-to-pay-it_b_56.html)
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: scottydl on February 08, 2017, 06:51:36 PM
How many other products do we have to pay Federal AND State taxes on?

So Why do we have to pay both on Tires?

Here's a decent set of answers to that question: What is FET and why do I have to pay it? (http://www.petestirestore.com/What-is-FET-and-why-do-I-have-to-pay-it_b_56.html)

And if you're a history buff, look at this one!  Federal Excise Tax on Tires: Where the Rubber Meets the Road  (http://www.policyarchive.org/handle/10207/957) (Public Policy Archive)
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: RedandSilver on February 08, 2017, 06:59:43 PM
Gas and diesel have both federal and state taxes.

" What is FET?"

"FET is an acronym for federal excise tax. It refers to the tax imposed by the federal government on tires used on the road with a maximum load capacity greater then 3500 pounds. Generally this applies to medium truck tires and heavy duty trailer tires."

What is FET and why do I have to pay it? (http://www.petestirestore.com/What-is-FET-and-why-do-I-have-to-pay-it_b_56.html)

They may try and say it's for the roads because heavy vehicles cause more damage but.....

IT is NOT used for our roads - because they are in such bad shape anyone can tell they are not being taken care of even though
they are receiving FET money.  Sad    :(

Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: NY_Dutch on February 08, 2017, 07:18:20 PM
They may try and say it's for the roads because heavy vehicles cause more damage but.....

IT is NOT used for our roads - because they are in such bad shape anyone can tell they are not being taken care of even though
they are receiving FET money.  Sad    :(

Well, that's getting into a political area that I don't think is appropriate here, but the case could probably be made for whether the states are receiving enough federal money to maintain the roads, or whether they're effectively using the money they do receive. Either way, dropping the FET on tires would not help.
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: Charlie 5320 on November 02, 2017, 02:39:10 PM
When I bought my coach it had a spare tire up in one of the pass thru compartments. I replaced the michelins odd size tires with Yohohamas in a different size. I have acquired a wheel and planed on buying another new tire for a spare, mounting it and carrying  it in the same place. It won't fit in the space mounted because the wheel sticks out another 3". I'm still going to buy another NEW tire to put back in there. I can't change it myself but at least I'll have it if needed. I'm also going to buy another sack of beads the dealer used when mounting my tires. I'm not going to chance it. I had a flat on my old Itasca with 16" tires many years ago. Limped it to a truck shop just outside of St Louis, Mo. They didn't have a tire nor did the other shop a mile from them. My spare was over 10 years old and they refused to put it on. I had to beg them, and it took quite a while to convince them to put it on for me. They made me sign a paper that they would NOT be held responsible for any damages what so ever pertaining that tire. I've traveled 3700 miles this summer without a spare but was very uneasy the hole time. I will be getting a spare tire for mine. 
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: Utclmjmpr on November 05, 2017, 02:59:25 PM
 The last time out was the first time I needed a tire..In 50 years of RVing..  Returning from a trip to northeast Oregon I turned left onto an on ramp for I84 southbound,, at which time a highway patrolman jumped out of his car and waved me to the shoulder,(WHAT NOW!!) (fortunately the shoulder was three lanes wide at that point). He said I had a tire problem on my toad,( 72 ACVW BAJA),, the left rear was GONE!! a thin rubber band still on each side of the wheel but no damage to the wheel (A hard to find collectable wheel).. Called Coach Net and gave them the location, tire specs.,..They checked stock and had the size in two choices,$190.00 or $104.00..
 Bring me the 104 and I will deal with the problem when arriving home.. I had to buy the tire of course and the labor to install it,, everything else was on Coach Net. (Coach Net will pay only to install a mounted tire ).>>>Dan

 In looking back I remember straddling a piece of sheet metal 15 miles back,, must have caught a corner...
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: skeeter_ca on November 07, 2017, 05:52:40 PM
I carry a mounted spare in the bed of my truck for my 5'er. If going on a long drive i throw another unmounted spare next to it. I have the road side assistance but i am more worried about being on some road in the middle of nowhere with no cell reception. What would you do then? Wait till some strange man drives by and hitch a ride to the nearest phone. Leaving your family on the side of the road. Sounds like the making of some horror film on Netflix. I am pretty sure i could change a 200lb tire if i had too. Have the spare and the proper equipment just in case.

skeeter

Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: Oldgator73 on November 08, 2017, 06:14:42 AM
We used to fulltime in a 37' triple axle 5th wheel. We were parked in what South Dakato laughably referred to as a rest stop overnight in the dead of winter. It was a Sunday morning and I woke up to sub zero temperatures and a middle outside tire showing the steel belts. I don't know how I determined it but it seemed my middle axle was bent. I had a jack that would lift the trailer enough to get the tire off. Did not want to use spare on a bent axle. Unhitched, locked up and headed to pohunk town looking for a tire. Found a tire shop open and bought a same size cheap tire, had it mounted and I installed on trailer. Was just good enough to get me to the factory where the axle was replaced and a new tire installed....for free.

Fast forward a few years and we're traveling out west where one can easily forget how fast you are going. Blew a tire. Replaced with the spare. Blew another tire. Took it off and since it was a triple axle did not have to have a tire for the distance I was going to town. Tire shop replaced tire with trailer still hooked to truck. Didn't cost much. Later was refueling and had conversation with gentleman in a carhauler. Told him I was blowing tires. He asked my speed and I said about 75-80. He said slow down to 60-65 and you won't blow anymore tires. It worked.
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: RockyHill on November 08, 2017, 01:49:50 PM
Week before last we needed our spare . . . yep, had a spare on the holder on the back of the motorhome, tire looked good . . . would have been great if it had been the right size.  Needless to say we had not looked closely enough to verify that :-[   Even better, after we replaced the blown out tire, bought another rim and tire so we'd have an effective spare, the spare tire cover wouldn't fit and the tow bar wouldn't fold out of the way. 

So word of advice, verify the size of your spare.

Shelia
Title: Re: Flat tire questions
Post by: aboatguy on November 08, 2017, 09:15:03 PM
A  spare 22.5 tire and rim has been under our 1997 Allegro Bus M35 DP since new.  When its time for new tires the inside drivers side rear tire/rim goes under the coach to replace the spare and the old spare and remaining 5 rims get new rubber.   (so there's never been a 20 year old spare)
//and to answer the OP's question, there's never been a roadside flat on this rig since new.