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RVing message boards => Boondocking => Topic started by: KandT on February 25, 2017, 06:52:23 PM

Title: Boondocking - where do you find a legal place?
Post by: KandT on February 25, 2017, 06:52:23 PM
I keep reading posts of people saying they boondock but I don't know how to find a legal place.  I am not talking about a parking lot but are there legal places to boondock?  In Pennsylvania I don't think the state parks just let you pull off the fire roads overnight or park in there trail head parking lots.

Then again Pennsylvania is not as nature friendly as say Utah.

Any help would be appreciated as site fees add up!
Title: Re: Boondocking - where do you find a legal place?
Post by: grashley on February 25, 2017, 07:16:11 PM
I'm watching, too!  Same question!
Title: Re: Boondocking - where do you find a legal place?
Post by: julezc on February 25, 2017, 07:25:56 PM
I downloaded the app Ultimate campsites, it lets you set filters for paid and free sites. There are many across the US, there is a free version and a paid version. I have found many sites through them. It doesn't include all of them I don't think, but a good number of them show up.
Title: Re: Boondocking - where do you find a legal place?
Post by: UTTransplant on February 25, 2017, 07:39:23 PM
I am not familiar with Pennsylvania, but a quick glance at the AllStays app shows free dispersed campgrounds in Allegeny National Forest and Delaware State Forest. Probably are others but I didn't look too far. Free campsites generally are in the most primitive areas, and that generally means National forests or equivalent. Once you have found an area, give the forest office a call and talk to a ranger. They will know the spots and how the roads are to get there.
Title: Re: Boondocking - where do you find a legal place?
Post by: FLMikeG on February 25, 2017, 09:01:13 PM
Hi KandT,

Boondocking means different things to different people, but I am assuming you mean no-hookups, low-cost (or free) camping. If you do some extensive web searching, you will find some good info, but it takes some patience and a lot of clicking around to find current and accurate information about exact places, prices, rules, etc.

Many federal and state owned lands will allow "dispersed camping" which is basically "boondocking". It is low cost (free in some cases) and usually in areas that are more remote or off the beaten path. Some national forests and state wilderness lands will allow camping for hunters or equestrian use. These equestrian-use areas will often allow small RV's to camp - there is no electricity at such sites, but water hookups are often available. Costs can range from free to $15 a night or so. You maximum stay also varies, but is usually no less than 14 days, and is often 30 days or more, but sometimes the stays must be non-consecutive at some point before it can be renewed.

Look for Federal stuff - Bureau of Land Management, National Forests, etc. Also look for state Forestry department lands, wildlife management areas, and nature preserves. Many will allow "no trace" dispersed camping.

Find the area you would like to boondock in or around, and start looking up county and state websites for camping. Move up the food chain from local government, county, state and then federal. Lastly but not least, the Army Corps of Engineers has many facilities across the country that offer low-cost camping and some of them have hookups and amenities.

Good luck and safe travels.  :)
Title: Re: Boondocking - where do you find a legal place?
Post by: JudyJB on February 25, 2017, 09:38:15 PM
The problem is that there is a LOT of federal land west of the Mississippi, but not much of it in the east. 

In states like PA, the best place to look is forest service lands.   
Title: Re: Boondocking - where do you find a legal place?
Post by: Gods Country on February 25, 2017, 09:58:43 PM
Public land in Pa doesn't permit the type of camping that boondocking entails.  I typically do so on private property where I hunt, about 1800 acres, so it's nice. 

The ANF however does permit roadside camping along numerous forest roads. they provide a map with all the roads permissible.  It's not going to be super quiet especially with all the gas drilling going on, but during the weekdays it shouldn't be too bad.  Also the ANF has regular RV campsites, some are huge by campground standards.  Typically they are dry sites along the Kinzua reservoir.
Title: Re: Boondocking - where do you find a legal place?
Post by: Great Horned Owl on February 25, 2017, 10:13:15 PM
See
https://www.fs.usda.gov/activity/allegheny/recreation/camping-cabins/?recid=6083&actid=34 (https://www.fs.usda.gov/activity/allegheny/recreation/camping-cabins/?recid=6083&actid=34)
or
https://www.fs.usda.gov/activity/allegheny/recreation/camping-cabins/?recid=6083&actid=34 (https://www.fs.usda.gov/activity/allegheny/recreation/camping-cabins/?recid=6083&actid=34).

Joel
Title: Re: Boondocking - where do you find a legal place?
Post by: jackiemac on February 26, 2017, 04:14:11 AM
Try this website  :D


https://freecampsites.net/#!Pennsylvania&query=region

Title: Re: Boondocking - where do you find a legal place?
Post by: Ron2012 on February 26, 2017, 11:59:30 PM
TRY:www.campendium.com
Title: Re: Boondocking - where do you find a legal place?
Post by: KandT on February 28, 2017, 06:54:22 PM
Thanks so much for all the replies.  West of the Mississippi is still the Wild West I suppose!
Title: Re: Boondocking - where do you find a legal place?
Post by: Brave Willy on April 07, 2017, 06:35:07 AM
This is a web site that I have found   I haven't been on the road yet to use it but I do intend to
https://freecampsites.net/
Title: Re: Boondocking - where do you find a legal place?
Post by: coxid on April 12, 2017, 11:08:09 PM
Goggle- Camping in BLM land in AZ and variations of it. (Change state, COE etc) goggle BLM camping locations in xxxxxx.