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RVing message boards => PCs, Communications, Electronics => Topic started by: novasbc on June 21, 2017, 11:02:13 PM

Title: Stock wiring for satellite on new trailers
Post by: novasbc on June 21, 2017, 11:02:13 PM
Is the stock wiring good enough for running current receivers?

I have had DirecTV for many years, and am looking to purchase an RV shortly.  I figure I'll take along a dish, I'm already familiar with aiming the thing.  However, I know I had to use a power inserter to run the multiswitch in the current LNB I have, supporting the Genie.  Any problems running this setup in an RV?  Lets say I get a trailer with 3 or 4 TV hookups, are they all just split from the same feed, or do they have separate wires coming to some junction box in the unit?

Worse comes to worse, I can use wireless genie receivers, along with the main receiver from my house, but still curious how they have them wired up from the factory.
Title: Re: Stock wiring for satellite on new trailers
Post by: Gary RV_Wizard on June 22, 2017, 09:23:59 AM
Not clear what "stock wiring" you are referring to. RG6 coax to the roof for a dome or dish?  An external coax port on the side for connecting an external cable?  A port labeled "Park Cable" or "Satellite" or maybe not labeled at all? And obviously all this is dependent on the make & model of the trailer, i.e. how the manufacturer designed and equipped it. There is no universal method.

Ports labeled "Park Cable' generally are not usable and typically feed an A/B switch shared with a roof antenna. Not available to feed a satellite receiver. Ports labeled "Satellite" are probably fine - they will be RG6 and terminate in a cabinet somewhere inside so you can attach a receiver. Roofs that are pre-wired for a dish or dome typically have one or two RG6 coax cables, suitable for most anything.
Title: Re: Stock wiring for satellite on new trailers
Post by: novasbc on June 22, 2017, 11:57:05 AM
Not clear what "stock wiring" you are referring to. RG6 coax to the roof for a dome or dish?

Yes, I was wondering if they run something that would be directv compatible.  I know it's unlikely they used high quality quad shielded RG6 with a high GHZ rating, but I wasn't sure if they used bottom of the barrel crappy RG59 instead.  Also, IIRC, DirecTV wants to be sure you have solid core copper wiring.

An external coax port on the side for connecting an external cable?  A port labeled "Park Cable" or "Satellite" or maybe not labeled at all? And obviously all this is dependent on the make & model of the trailer, i.e. how the manufacturer designed and equipped it. There is no universal method.

The ones I have looked at, across multiple brands seem to have two connections on the outside, one labeled for specifically for satellite, the other for park cable.  Knowing whether there was consistency across the brands in terms of wiring was one of the reasons for my query.

Ports labeled "Park Cable' generally are not usable and typically feed an A/B switch shared with a roof antenna. Not available to feed a satellite receiver. Ports labeled "Satellite" are probably fine - they will be RG6 and terminate in a cabinet somewhere inside so you can attach a receiver. Roofs that are pre-wired for a dish or dome typically have one or two RG6 coax cables, suitable for most anything.

So, if I'm looking at a unit that has external connections, both for satellite, and for the park cable, you say that it is likely the satellite connection terminates into a cabinet somewhere inside.  If the unit happens to have three spots for televisions, are they likely to have three terminated RG6 connectors inside that cabinet?  Basically, I'm trying to figure out if I can have 2 or more receivers to run say the kids TV versus the adults' TV.  If they are individual RG6 runs into the cabinet, I would assume that it would be necessary to mount a DirecTV box near each of the televisions.  If they just ran an HDMI cable into the cabinet, then I would need to put 2+ receivers in the cabinet.

Thanks for the response, these questions are coming up as I'm trying to understand what needs to be done post-purchase.  I find that the manufacturers don't give you much detail on what they do for each particular unit, so unless I go and walk one, and check every part in detail, it's hard to know what they do.

Mark