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RVing message boards => Fulltiming => Topic started by: DaveRB55 on September 01, 2017, 10:30:53 PM

Title: Sun Shields
Post by: DaveRB55 on September 01, 2017, 10:30:53 PM
Hello Everyone,

I've been doing some research on sun shields and I'm looking for some feedback.

My MH has  the internal sun shield and nighttime shade neither of which helped much in the the Texas sun.  We are considering purchasing a shield and found web info on both the internal and external types as follows:

External
Magneshade:   External, mounts using magnets, easy to hang with extending pole, significant inside temp improvement, $549 for solid color, $944 for custom art

Sunguard:  External, mounts using snaps, twist locks or Velcro, need a ladder to install, significant temp improvement,  Std fabric $315, Hi Density Fabric $370

Internal:
HeritageArtLTD:  Internal, Mounts using velcro to circlets and strip on top edge,  Custom trimmed for window, $225 for solid color, 250 for custom art

RVSunshades4Less:  Internal, Mounts using suction cups,  Standard width material  37-44", buyer does final trimming,  solid color only $85


All use Vinyl coated, sun shield screen material.   Most of the comments I've  found are with the Magneshade.  Keeps the heat out before passing through the window,  easy to install, very expensive but very effective nearly everyone satisfied with the product. (but something less expensive would be good)

I've found very little feedback on the internally sourced screens.  Most people said internal screens let too much heat in but I would like to discern if this is based on the std factory screen or was this from recent purchasing experience.  I have a Winnebago class A with the MCD solar screen which is a good 8-10 inches away from the window.  It lets in a tremendous amount of heat even if backed up with the nightshade.  I get the physics...all that heat coming through the window heating up the space between the screen and window has to go somewhere. 

But these aftermarket internal screens fit very close to the window (a lot closer than my motorized screen and the windows are nearly vertical).  I was wondering if anyone has used the internal, velcro or suction cup type sunscreens and whether they found them to be effective in reducing temp.   85-$255-$315-$549...are big differences 

My thinking is a screen close to the window has less area to trap heat and with the backup MCD screen would provide reasonably effective heat reduction.
I'm just trying to get the most value for my dollar.   I really would prefer an internal screen, both for cost and not having to deal with an external issue, cleanup and drying,  but obviously only if it works reasonably well.  So how about it, any internal sun shield users have any feedback or care to comment.

Thanks,
Dave 
Title: Re: Sun Shields
Post by: Ernie n Tara on September 02, 2017, 08:01:36 AM
The objective of an internal screen is to trap a layer of air between the screen and windshield.  So long as that air is not allowed to circulate, the screen should be quite effective. We have the MCS screens and they have been quite effective as they fit tightly on the sides and are sealed at the critical top.

Outside screens may reflect more heat as well as providing an extra layer of insulation. Overall, they are probably more effective.

Ernie
Title: Re: Sun Shields
Post by: DaveRB55 on September 06, 2017, 10:40:05 AM
Ernie, thanks for responding
Dave
Title: Re: Sun Shields
Post by: Sun2Retire on September 06, 2017, 10:44:49 AM
We had external shades on our previous coach and it was the first thing I had made for this one - wouldn't be without them. Had them made for every window in case we're parked for awhile in the sun, usually just use front 3.


Dramatic difference in temp, and I think much more effective than internal as they stop the heat before it gets to the glass. But.... they are a pain to install and remove.
Title: Re: Sun Shields
Post by: Old_Crow on October 25, 2017, 10:14:40 AM
I have the internal, suction cup screens from RVsunshades4less.  I got the beige color to match the exterior of the coach. 
They work okay as a sun shade.  When the afternoon sun is on the windshield, I still draw the curtains to block out the heat.  Where they shine is as privacy screens during the day.  We camp host, and it's nice to be able to look out the windshield on our time off and know that the people outside can't see us. 
Title: Re: Sun Shields
Post by: bobcat12 on October 29, 2017, 03:11:36 PM
I have the internal, suction cup screens from RVsunshades4less.  I got the beige color to match the exterior of the coach. 
They work okay as a sun shade.  When the afternoon sun is on the windshield, I still draw the curtains to block out the heat.  Where they shine is as privacy screens during the day.  We camp host, and it's nice to be able to look out the windshield on our time off and know that the people outside can't see us.
We also use the RVsunshades. We liked the price, ease of installation, no ladder needed, no wet shades if tearing down on rainy day, ability to see out and some help with heat. We do close curtains if direct sun.
Title: Re: Sun Shields
Post by: Len2 on October 29, 2017, 04:46:44 PM
Dave, We just bought the SunGuard Shades. I did not want the internal ones even though they would be easier to install. I feel it is better to stop the sun before the glass. We are in Texas and it gets hot here. I looked at RVSunShades.com, but it looked liked they only install with snaps. They will come to you. It may take a while. If they are in California and you are in Texas, you have to wait until they schedule Texas. However, you don't have to install them. They measure, cut, and sew onsite. I checked out a set when we were camping a few weeks ago. The owner/camper was satisfied with them. I chose SunGuard because I do not like snaps. I wanted the twistlocks. It always seems like when I get anything with snaps one or more of the snaps works extremely hard and after a few snaps something tears. I don't want to drill holes in my MH as it is and then to be pulling a snap loose and pulling the screw out of the MH would not make me a happy camper. Just MHO. 
Title: Re: Sun Shields
Post by: Tom on October 29, 2017, 06:46:42 PM
Quote
It always seems like when I get anything with snaps one or more of the snaps works extremely hard and after a few snaps something tears.

Snaps come in different 'actions' (e.g. hard, soft). A snap that's tough to put on could be due to a hard action &/or dirt in the female snap. It could also be due to misalignment because of incorrect positioning of the snap in the canvas or on the RV. A little lubrication goes a long way to making it easier to 'snap on'. But, too much lubrication makes it easy for the snap to come off in high wind.

A 'trick' from my early fishing days with 'tight ferrules' - rub your fingers through your hair and then rub them on the male snap; This often provides sufficient lubrication to make the snap work easily without having the potential of coming off unexpectedly. Alternatively, they sell a 'snap lube', although I have little experience with it; I'd think it provides greater potential for accumulating dirt.

Meanwhile, you can buy a simple snap tool (https://www.bing.com/images/search?view=detailV2&ccid=xX2re4lN&id=8E6317AB1981E6C8C44F2C538E60856292F22C2B&thid=OIP.xX2re4lNlLTlRII51U3Jug4l4l&q=snap+tool&simid=608017768653261818&selectedIndex=0&ajaxhist=0) that helps attach or remove difficult snaps without tearing fabric or screens.
Title: Re: Sun Shields
Post by: Len2 on October 31, 2017, 12:57:58 PM
Thanks for the info Tom. I was not aware of the snap tool.
Title: Re: Sun Shields
Post by: ArdraF on October 31, 2017, 02:19:53 PM
We've had exterior windshield shades on all our motorhomes.  Why let the heat in through the windshield when you can deflect the sun's rays before heating the window inside?  In earlier motorhomes we had both snap-on and twist-on shades.  They required drilling holes for the hardware.  Most important, they also required getting out a ladder to put them on and take them off.  This time we wanted to stay away from ladders so we got one from Prompt RV Sunscreens of Winterhaven FL.  Their screens require no snaps and no ladders.  The closest we come to a ladder is if the front end is pretty high off the ground and then we use our step for the front door to reach a little higher.  Each end of the screen has an aluminum piece that keeps it firmly in place.  We hook one end of the screen near the front door with a very large suction cup that has never failed and the other end has a rubber strap that hooks on the driver window post.  The screen comes in a nice and compact holder of the same material so it doesn't unfurl when stored.  We like this one the best of the ones we've had because no holes are drilled in the motorhome to put in hardware and we don't need to get on a ladder.  It's a clever device that works quite well.  See http://www.rv-sunscreen.com/

I've attached two photos.  One shows the screen quite well from the passenger side.  The second doesn't show it quite as well but near the driver mirror you may be able to see a small black dot that is the strap holding the screen in place on the driver's side.

ArdraF
Title: Re: Sun Shields
Post by: Isaac-1 on October 31, 2017, 02:29:21 PM
One note here Magna Shades uses sewn on Sunbrella type material for the edge trim, most others use a heat sealed vinyl scrim which has a much shorter outdoor life.
Title: Re: Sun Shields
Post by: taoshum on October 31, 2017, 10:45:04 PM
If you reflect the sunlight before it goes thru the glass you avoid the "greenhouse" effect of having glass.  Interior shades help but not as much.  Read about it:  http://www.aboutrving.com/rv-topics/keeping-your-cool-with-sunscreens/