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RV-related and other recreational activities => Fishing => Topic started by: MN Blue Skies on October 10, 2017, 04:30:21 PM

Title: Spey Casting for Fly Fishing
Post by: MN Blue Skies on October 10, 2017, 04:30:21 PM
During the SE Minnesota Fall Colors Rally I had a chance to attend a Spey Casting seminar on the Root River. The instructor's casts were consistently in the 70' to 80' range and some up to 100' plus.  Pretty impressive but he has been using the Spey casting technique for 12 years and has a collection of 112 rods.  The instructor recommended watching YouTube videos by Ed Ward.

Since the seminar I have been thinking about switching to this technique.  I started doing some research and discovered that there are different types of Spey Casting.  For me fly fishing with a split rod using a Skagit Spey technique seems to be the most versatile for the types of fishing I want to do which includes lakes, rivers, and streams (I'm from the land of 10,000 lakes.)  If I understand correctly I would be able to cast further with less effort, use larger flies, wind would be less problematic, and the casting technique would be more compact.  I also read that the downside to a split rod is that it's harder to learn Spey casting on a split rod than on a traditional Spey rod.

I'm looking for opinions on Spey Casting and split rods. 

Of course switching to this type of fly fishing will require an investment.  A new mattress for the 5th wheel and a six sided Clam quick set screen tent will probably win out over new fly fishing equipment.  Hmm ... I wonder if there is a market for the fly fishing equipment I gave to DH six years ago and is still sitting in the unopened boxes?  After six years I think it safe to say that I'm not going to convert him to fly fishing.

The Root River runs through Lanesboro and SE Minnesota. The river has brook, brown, and rainbow trout as well as rock bass, smallmouth bass, sunfish, crappies and catfish.   Attached is a picture of the Root River near the dam in Lanesboro. While I was there the fishing conditions were excellent.






Title: Re: Spey Casting for Fly Fishing
Post by: Hfx_Cdn on October 10, 2017, 05:04:42 PM
    Max I gave up fly fishing about 40 years ago when I realized that it was about one tenth the price to buy Atlantic Salmon than to fish for them, plus invariably what I'd catch were either too big or too small to keep.  Although I must admit it always was a thrill to catch a salmon and the only way you can fish for them hare is with flies.

Ed
Title: Re: Spey Casting for Fly Fishing
Post by: MN Blue Skies on October 10, 2017, 05:48:46 PM
Ed you make a good point.  That makes me question why I love fly fishing.   ???

To answer my own question.  I want to fish Minnesota lakes without needing a boat.  I love walleye, northern pike, bass, crappies, and sunfish.  I'm hoping Spey casting will give me the opportunity to reach those fish.  I also like the challenge of fishing for trout on a clear Minnesota stream. 
Title: Re: Spey Casting for Fly Fishing
Post by: Tom on October 10, 2017, 07:14:21 PM
I've never used any of the spey casting techniques, but just looked at a couple of YouTube videos. I (now) understand what the technique does & how, but I think I'd need a lot of practice &/or instruction to break my existing habits.

Quote
I want to fish Minnesota lakes without needing a boat.

Have you considered a float tube?
Title: Re: Spey Casting for Fly Fishing
Post by: MN Blue Skies on October 10, 2017, 08:13:00 PM
Yes I have considered a float tube but it is still another piece of equipment to haul around. In Minnesota there are many spots on lakes where a Spey Cast would allow a longer cast from shore especially if you waded in a little bit from shore.  No fussing around with a boat or tube.   My perception might be naive but I will do more research and talk with local fly shops. If money weren't an object I'd jump right in. 

Spey Casting seems like side casting but with the ability to get more distance with less effort. Tom, would Spey Casting be easier on your shoulders?  I agree that there would be a learning curve. 
Title: Re: Spey Casting for Fly Fishing
Post by: Tom on October 11, 2017, 12:18:10 AM
Quote from: MN Blue Skies
... would Spey Casting be easier on your shoulders?

I think it might be harder on the shoulders, because you have to pick up all that line after the drop it onto the water behind you. At least that was my perception after watching YouTube.