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General Discussion / Re: How to Interpret Tire Inflation Chart
« Last post by Lou Schneider on Today at 02:25:42 PM »

Every now and then, the head manufacturing guy would stop the mill to challenge the accuracy of the electronic gauges. He'd produce a huge wooden caliper, big enough to measure 80" width, and heavy enough to make it almost impossible to pick up. He had to shield himself from the heat of the slab, and his wooden caliper would catch fire as he closed the jaws. Then he'd slide the caliper open by approx 0.5" to get it off the slab, and try to prove that the electronic width gauge was inaccurate.

I'd think he'd burn off more than 0.010" of wood between the time the plank contacted the strip and the time he took the measurement.
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General Discussion / Re: How to Interpret Tire Inflation Chart
« Last post by Tom on Today at 02:20:50 PM »
My funniest measurement accuracy experience was back in the 60's, when I worked on electronics in a steel mill, part of the largest steel plant in Europe. 20-ton "cherry red hot" ingots of steel entered the mill at one end, and coiled steel strip came out the other end.

Thickness of strip was controlled to +/- 0.001" and measured using real-time xray as the strip exited the mill at 45mph.

Earlier in the process, width across an 80" wide slab was measured to a tolerance of +/- 0.010" real time using a different/less precise real-time technique.

Every now and then, the head manufacturing guy would stop the mill to challenge the accuracy of the electronic gauges. He'd produce a huge wooden caliper, big enough to measure 80" width, and heavy enough to make it almost impossible to pick up. He had to shield himself from the heat of the slab, and his wooden caliper would catch fire as he closed the jaws. Then he'd slide the caliper open by approx 0.5" to get it off the slab, and try to prove that the electronic width gauge was inaccurate.
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General Discussion / Re: Amazing
« Last post by Tinmania on Today at 02:20:10 PM »
Ah, this one again, it has shown up on other RV forums, it was built a few years ago as either an Aviation control tower for temporary events or a control tower trainer, and has since been repurposed as some sort of mobile class room.
That's what I immediately thought when I first saw it.

Lot's of customized, or purpose built, RVs out there. Like those I have seen at carnivals or fairs for the workers. At first glance they just look like a regular 5th wheel or TT. Then I realized they had wayyyy too many doors. They were divided into individual bedrooms, each with its own outside, and only outside, entrance. Towards the rear, presumably, is where workers on the low end of the totem pole sleep, with upper and lower sections so two people can share one bedroom. The middle section, they are one person per bedroom. At the front, well that must be for a boss or equivalent because they get the king suite with its own bathroom.
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Newcomers' Corner / Re: Motorhome windshield damage & insurance
« Last post by scottydl on Today at 02:08:44 PM »
The victimization effect just seems to be much smaller with the $0 deductible rule. Or at least the gain is spread out over a much larger span of time, compared to coming up with $1000 or the entire repair cost... which is what you are currently facing this time.
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Amen to that. Let me tell you about my full 13 Month Experience of living with Nuvo H20, House Cartridge Filtered water. 
I was at an ACE Hardware when that Nuvo thing caught my eye. I was looking into an On The Go unit at the time, but was concerned about the manual regeneration process. So the Nuvo H20 seemed like a good option. There was a factory/marketing rep there going on and on about how amazing and revolutionary Nuvo H20 was. This in a county in AZ with hard water even for AZ standards. Initially I thought assumed the regularly-replaced cartridges contained pre-treated (with salt) resin beads that would soften the water (a la Rayne and similar who drop pre-treated resin ranks). But, nope, it's touted as a no salt system. A quick search on my phone led to many negative reviews and that was it--no Nuvo H20 for me. I'm glad I didn't bite on that one.
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General Discussion / Re: How to Interpret Tire Inflation Chart
« Last post by Tom on Today at 01:45:43 PM »
Reminds me of a college class I taught for working folks many moons ago. Automotive transmission guys would be talking about machining to a tolerance of  +/- 0.001". One guy stood up and said I machine wood for piano keyboards, and my tolerance is +/- a quarter of an inch (+/- 0.25"). The automotive guys were stunned  :)
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General Discussion / Re: Fridge questions update...and...
« Last post by darsben on Today at 01:29:12 PM »
The volunteers sometimes make errors but they are volunteers so we overlook occasional faux pas
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General Discussion / Re: How to Interpret Tire Inflation Chart
« Last post by Ex-Calif on Today at 12:43:21 PM »
Nice reminder and as an addition this is why engineers (should not) produce results with greater precision than the precision of the measuring device.

In other words the average of:

1
5
9
17
13
1 +
====
46 total = 7.6666667 average is not correct.

You have to accept 8 (rounded) or measure more precisely. This is a very common error. And as Tom points out if you want 3 decimal accuracy you better have a tool that measures 3 decimals with some reasonable level of 3 digit accuracy calibration - like +/- 0.005 - If that was your accuracy and precision - even then you might only use 2 decimals in your results depending on the accuracy required in the result. 3 digit accuracy is not ensured with that calibration.

Some of the things we do in aviation require 4-decimal limits (like nominal +/- 0.0002). We calibrate to 5-decimals in those applications.


Thanks for the link Joel. However, the ad says "Accurate 1.0 PSI precision level". Accuracy and precision are two quite different things, and these folks are mixing up the two. Their gauge reads to a precision of 1 psi, but it's highly unlikely that it reads to within 1 psi accuracy.

FYI precision relates to the number of significant digits that the gauge can read (i.e. 90, 91, 92, etc). Such a gauge might still have an accuracy of +/-5psi.

From someone who supplied chips to high end instrument manufacturers such as HP, Fluke, Tektronix, etc from the 70's.

On a different product line, I recall demonstrating to an engineer that his wonderful new digital voltmeter design that read voltage from 0.xxx to 199.xxx volts, couldn't hold +/-10% accuracy. IOW being able to read a voltage of e.g. 120.435 volts was meaningless given that the true voltage was somewhere between 114 volts and 126 volts. I don't recall if the engineer cried or just went back to the drawing board.
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General Discussion / Re: Fridge questions update...and...
« Last post by RVfixer on Today at 12:41:18 PM »
Thanks darsben, that's helpful. I still don't think an RV fridge post and thread should be moved to trailers. If that is the case there are dozens and dozens of posts that need moving!! My post was titled Fridge Questions and it was moved. Another poster's title is Air conditioner problem...it is on his trailer not moved...and shouldn't be moved just like my post. OK, I'm done ranting...I do appreciate your info.
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General Discussion / Re: Coleman Roof Top Heat Pump
« Last post by docj on Today at 12:40:12 PM »
We ordered two Coleman Mach 8+ 15k heat pumps in August and both have now been installed.  My local on-site RV repair service said they were difficult to obtain, but he had them delivered ~3 weeks.

We absolutely love them compared to the elderly Dometic A/C's they replaced.  They are quieter (no compressor noise inside) and, of course 15k of new clean condenser coil provides for much better cooling than 13.5k of 20-year-old coil.

Fortunately, we were able to use the existing thermostat wiring so we didn't have any installation issues.

One small think you might otherwise overlook, if you look deeply on the Airxcel website you will see that an interesting design feature is that separate fans with separate motors are used in the condenser and evaporator.  This means that the air flow through the condenser remains the same even when you're using low fan speed inside the RV which means that the full 15k BTU cooling capability is available.

Also, take note of the fact that there's a 2-year warranty and you can purchase a 3-year parts-only addon for $90
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