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Author Topic: Friction Sway Control - How do you Adjust?  (Read 16625 times)

RV_Hokie

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Friction Sway Control - How do you Adjust?
« on: November 24, 2008, 09:57:35 PM »
I know that Friction Sway Control is a limited amount of sway control, but my question is with the adjustment arm on these devices, how do you know how tight to tighten to have it work properly?
« Last Edit: November 24, 2008, 10:29:56 PM by RV_Hokie »
Thanks,

Tony

Roanoke Valley Area of VA
First TT, '89 Skamper 2310T
GO HOKIES !!

John From Detroit

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    • Diabetics Forum
Re: Friction Sway Control - How do you Adjust?
« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2008, 10:01:06 PM »
There are basically two ways to adjust the ones I have.. First there is the lever you use to loosen or tighten. You could, in theory "back off" a bit on that one to lessen the friction. I do not suggest this

On the friction plate either directly above, or below, the bolt that lever turns.. Is a bolt or nut.  That's the friction adjustment
Nothing adds excitement like something that is none of your business
My Home is where I park it.

RV_Hokie

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Re: Friction Sway Control - How do you Adjust?
« Reply #2 on: November 24, 2008, 10:32:42 PM »
I know about the adjusting items, but what is tight or loose?  What determines how tight or loose you make them and how do you determine the setting that works best for you setup?  How do you feel this "friction" that is tight or loose?  Is it the ability to move the sway control bar itself that measures the tightness or looseness of it in regard to the way it will manage the sway when towed?  ???
Thanks,

Tony

Roanoke Valley Area of VA
First TT, '89 Skamper 2310T
GO HOKIES !!

Sean Woodruff

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    • ProPride, Inc.
Re: Friction Sway Control - How do you Adjust?
« Reply #3 on: November 24, 2008, 10:40:03 PM »
While I CERTAINLY DO NOT recommend them, here are the instructions...

*******

1. SWAY CONTROL CANNOT BE USED ON TRAILERS WITH SURGE BRAKES. DO NOT USE SWAY
CONTROL ON CLASS I OR II HITCHES. USE ON CLASS III OR IV ONLY.

2. Trailer loading: Proper trailer loading is your first-line defense against dangerous instability and sway.
Heavy items should be placed on the floor in front of the axle. The load should be balanced side-to-side and
secured to prevent shifting. Tongue weight should be about 10-15 percent of gross trailer weight for most
trailers. Too low a percentage of tongue weight can cause sway. Load the trailer heavier in front.

3. The handle is an on/off device. The bolt below is for adjustment only.

4. When towing during slippery conditions such as wet, icy, or snow-covered roads or on loose gravel, turn
on/off handle counterclockwise until all tension is removed from unit. Failure to do so could prevent tow
vehicle and trailer from turning properly.

5. Do not speed up if sway occurs. Sway increases with speed. Do not continue to operate a swaying vehicle.
Check trailer loading, sway control adjustment and all other equipment until the cause of sway has been
determined and corrected.

6. Never paint or lubricate slide bar.


HOOK-UP

a. Lubricate both balls with a small amount of grease, place socket of slide bar over ball and secure with
clip. Loosen handle until the slide bar can be moved. Extend sway control assembly and place
socket over ball on trailer, secure with other clip.

b. Retighten handle until it stops (handle should be in its original level position). The sway control assembly is
preset at the factory with a tension suitable for most light trailers.

c. On some installations, damage to the sway control may occur during extremely sharp turning maneuvers.
This can be checked by slowly backing vehicle into a jackknife position while someone is watching. Do not
allow slide bar to contract completely (bottom out) or bumper to contact sway control. If it looks as thought
contact will be made or the sway control will bottom out then the sway control must be removed before
backing trailer.

ADJUSTMENT

a. Trailer configurations and loading, road and weather conditions, towing speed, tire condition and pressure,
and center of gravity of trailer all affect towing. To get maximum benefits from the sway control assembly, a
series of road tests should be taken with the loaded trailer. During the first road test try the sway control at
the factory preset force. On subsequent trips increase or decrease tension by turning the adjusting bolt in
1/4 turn increments in the direction shown on the label until the desired control is achieved. For large
trailers, it may be necessary to install a second sway control unit.

b. After about 1000 miles of towing, remove the slide bar from the sway control and clean the friction surfaces
with a wire brush. Repeat this cleaning procedure about every 10,000 miles.
ProPride, Inc.
800-960-4767
www.ProPrideHitch.com

Carl L

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Re: Friction Sway Control - How do you Adjust?
« Reply #4 on: November 25, 2008, 01:23:37 AM »
Great rundown Sean, thank you.  I agree with you in not recommending friction sway control.
Carl L/LA   [Forum Staff]  KI6SEZ

Prowler 23LV TT pulled by a '95 Ford Bronco

MLCBFarrell

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Re: Friction Sway Control - How do you Adjust?
« Reply #5 on: November 25, 2008, 06:36:55 AM »
Hi Tony,

When we used friction sway control, it took us few times of using it to find a place where my husband felt comfortable. We started out with only one anti-sway control, but soon added a second which gave us much greater control on our 29' ultralite TT. Our friction bar had a little handle looking thing, and if you turned it one way it loosened and allowed the pieces to slide more easily. If you turned it the opposite way, it made it more difficult for the pieces to slide. My husband played with it every time we went out and finally found that for him, with our SUV/TT combo, that he felt he had the most control when he tightened the arm all the way and then loosened it a certain amount. Of course, that was him and it will be different with every situation. This is also how the dealer told us to use these when he installed them. Yours may be different or the directions may suggest adjusting them a different way. Now that we have a bigger, heavier trailer we have switched hitches and now use a Reese Dual Cam antisway/weight distributing system as suggested by many of the forum members.
Good luck, LuAnn
Mike (U.S.N., ret. '03), LuAnn, DD (17), DS (15)
Emma, the camping beagle mutt,
3 cats that stay behind as house guards!
2005 Ford Excursion 4x4 Ltd. V-10
2008 Jayco Jayflight G2 32BHDS
Lifetime Good Sam member
Northern Neck of VA

John From Detroit

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Re: Friction Sway Control - How do you Adjust?
« Reply #6 on: November 25, 2008, 06:48:07 AM »
I agree great rundown shawn

I was going to say that to find the proper adjustment you use the "Trial and error" method.

Myself.. I set mine fairly heavy (Tight) when I used it, IT was set tighter than I suspect they recommended.  Never had a problem though.
Nothing adds excitement like something that is none of your business
My Home is where I park it.

RV_Hokie

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  • Posts: 11
Re: Friction Sway Control - How do you Adjust?
« Reply #7 on: November 25, 2008, 04:34:53 PM »
I do see all the comments about not using friction sway control, and do appreciate the hints on how to set them.  SO if i cannot use a weight distributed hitch as my vehicle manual clearly says not to (Land Rover Discovery II) what sway control should I use?  ???
Thanks,

Tony

Roanoke Valley Area of VA
First TT, '89 Skamper 2310T
GO HOKIES !!

Carl L

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Re: Friction Sway Control - How do you Adjust?
« Reply #8 on: November 25, 2008, 06:42:59 PM »
No lie?  Well you gotta go with the owners manual.  It is rather odd as the Discovery II is listed with a tow rating of 5,500 lbs.   That is an awfully heavy trailer for a weight bearing hitch system.   The tongue weight would be in the range of 600 to 800 lbs.   Weight bearing hitches are normally on things like utility trailers and boat trailers.

A lot of British trailers (caravans) seem to use surge brakes.  WD hitches cannot normally be used with surge brakes.  That could be a reason.   That would not apply to the electric brake systems used in American travel trailers.   You might want to check out the reasoning with Rover.   Or maybe one of our Brit members or Rover fans could chime in here.

And
Carl L/LA   [Forum Staff]  KI6SEZ

Prowler 23LV TT pulled by a '95 Ford Bronco