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Author Topic: Shortning an Awning  (Read 2328 times)

bkklett

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Shortning an Awning
« on: March 29, 2009, 09:25:57 AM »
I recently purchased a Motorhome without an awning. I can see where there use to be one, however it is not there. I also own a TT and it has an carefree awning on it. It is longer than the one I need for the motorhome. Has anyone ever shortended an awning? I will be purchasing new fabric for the motorhome, I was just interested in the tube and the arms.
Let em know,
Brian ;D

judway

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Re: Shortning an Awning
« Reply #1 on: March 29, 2009, 05:57:08 PM »
I have my A&E awning all apart after a tree jumped out and attacked it >:(. I would assume that the Carefree unit is similarly made. The roll tube appears to be an aluminum extrusion and could be cut to what ever length you need. The end pieces are pop riveted into the roll tube. The end pieces and spring mechanism should work fine. The aluminum cover slats are also extrusions and can be cut to length. The arms and any mechanisms should work fine as is. If you are pretty good mechanically, it should not be a problem. I have never shortened one, but  would not be hesitant to start the project. My 20' damaged system could be cut off and made into a 16' or possibility an 18' unit. The canvas part of the awning would require some sewing to fix the cut edge, that I can't do. Check the websites and see if you can get some pictures of how it is made. If you can't find anything and you want, I will photograph mine and send the pictures to you. A new 20' awning costs about $1100.

Wayne
Wayne
2003 Itasca Horizon 36LD
2012 Chevrolet Malibu
Retired Electrical Engineer
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Gary RV Roamer

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Re: Shortning an Awning
« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2009, 06:09:39 PM »
You can re-use the arms. I think I would buy a new roller tube, though, rather than cutting it down. I think the roller tube kit comes with new torsion springs, which you probably need anyway if you are rebuilding.

I see no real reason you could not cut the long tube down to size. Remove the end caps and torsion springs, cut the tube and re-attach springs and caps. Just not sure it is worth the effort.

What make and model awing is it?
Gary
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Just Lou

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Re: Shortning an Awning
« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2009, 06:53:27 PM »
My question would be......
WHY, deface and devalue the TT by removing the awning  ??? unless you have already declared the trailer to be junk.

You are only saving the difference in cost between new fabric and a complete awning and you now have a TT without an awning.  It may be false economy if you intend to use or sell the TT.

It's kinda like trading a $10K car getting 20mpg for a $20K car getting 30mpg just so you can feel like you are saving money on fuel costs.

You are only saving the difference between mileage figures...., and you're out $10K. ::) :-[ :(

Just my thoughts on the subject.  However, It does not appear to be a big job to shorten an existing awning roller.  You only need to alter one end.
“You don't write because you want to say something, you write because you have something to say.” F. Scott Fitzgerald
lou  ---  '97 Bounder 34V (F53 w/tag), '99 Honda Accord EX

bkklett

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Re: Shortning an Awning
« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2009, 07:23:27 PM »
I have thought about the deflation in price of the TT  if I take off the awning. I am still undecided! ??? I have priced a new awning around $900. I fell into the to eager to buy, to realize I should have not got a rig without an awning. I was also trying to weigh the options if I used the awning off the TT.
Thanks,
Brian

hikerdogs

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Re: Shortning an Awning
« Reply #5 on: April 01, 2009, 09:17:40 PM »
Something you should be aware of is the fact that there are 2 torsion springs in the tube (one attached to each end cap).  Before you start cutting the tube be sure both springs will still fit in the new shortened length without running into each other.  It would be a bummer to get it all cut to length then find out it's too short to house the springs.
Hikerdogs
2001 Winnebago Adventurer 32V

Gary RV Roamer

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Re: Shortning an Awning
« Reply #6 on: April 02, 2009, 09:39:53 AM »
The springs aren't that long - about 30" each if I remember correctly.
Gary
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Gary Brinck
2004 American Tradition
2007 GMC Acadia
Homebase: Ocala National Forest, FL

rsalhus

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Re: Shortning an Awning
« Reply #7 on: April 02, 2009, 01:00:17 PM »
Quote
The springs aren't that long - about 30" each if I remember correctly.

The A&E torsion spring assemblies are actually closer to 36" each so you're all right there unless you want an awning less than 6 feet long.   ;D ;D ;D

The important part to remember is to observe and measure the holes at the end of the roller tube for the pop rivets that hold the end cap on.  These holes will have to be replicated on the cut end of the roller tube so that the hole positions are identical to the original roller tube end.  Also, you will need to cut a slot in the end of the roller tube for the poly-tape.  Just make the new end of the roller tube identical (in every way) to the old one and you'll be OK.

BTW, my 21' A&E roller tube is made out of steel.  Very strong, and didn't sag in the middle at all.  A better choice than aluminum IMO.

Rolf Salhus
Currently at: Home, Apple Valley, MN

jab2373

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Re: Shortning an Awning
« Reply #8 on: June 04, 2013, 12:15:04 AM »
I have a awning I am putting on a 77 Winnie, I bought the arms separate but the roller was given to me, its just to long....what I was wondering was how does the roller lock into place when extended? The roller looks like the older style and it still has the caps on it, I am going to put the caps on it from my arms but I still cant figure out how it wont just retract once I roll it out. The new ones have a lock to hold it out while you extend the upper arms, but this doesn't, and it hasn't been remover either, everything is still en tacked.

John From Detroit

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Re: Shortning an Awning
« Reply #9 on: June 04, 2013, 07:48:42 AM »
As you fact the roller the lock (Assuming manual roller) is on the right side, DO NOT DISTURBE)

The spring is on the left, You can drill out the rivets, and carefully remove the cap, the spring will pull out with it.  Then you slice and dice, replace the cap, drill new holes and re-rivet with POP rivets   After that continue with the instructions that came with the kit.

NOTE: Measure carefully.. Though you can re-cut to shorten it.. Making it longer is not as easy :).

Last awning part I replaced I measured carefully. added 1 Inch to be sure, and it turned out to be exactly the correct length.   (Yes I got lucky)
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rsalhus

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Re: Shortning an Awning
« Reply #10 on: June 04, 2013, 09:54:34 AM »

Quote
...what I was wondering was how does the roller lock into place when extended?

There is an awning lock built into the right-side torsion spring assembly which is inside the roller tube.  The lever on the right side of the endcap sets and releases the lock.

Once you drill out the rivets and remove the right side endcap from the roller tube (assuming it's an A&E awning) , the whole torsion spring assembly will pull right out.  It consists of the endcap, the lock lever, the lock, the torsion spring assembly, and the shaft and connecting piece that the rafter arm attaches to.  You should then see whether it's an older cam-type lock or a newer and better ratchet-type lock.  If it's the older cam-type, it may be worn down enough that the lock won't hold any longer. You could easily replace it with the newer ratchet-type torsion spring assembly and the lock will work.

If you plan on shortening the roller tube, I suppose that could be done if you drill holes for the endcap rivets in the proper places and can find awning material (or shorten the current one) to fit the shortened roller tube.
Rolf Salhus
Currently at: Home, Apple Valley, MN

jab2373

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Re: Shortning an Awning
« Reply #11 on: June 04, 2013, 09:27:36 PM »
I still don't understand it, there is no lever on the right or left side to lock it, and both sides appear to have torsion springs just no lever to lock it, I know what your talking about because I live in an RV park and have looked at the newer rollers and they do have latches on the right side. That's why I am confused. the roller I have has no name on it, just a F for front and R for rear on the caps that mount into the arms, you can turn these and feel tension separate from each other, which leads me to believe they are separate springs, there is just no locking Mechanism. Could it be an older style or some other way to lock it? Or does it just not lock?
Thanks for replying

Lou Schneider

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Re: Shortning an Awning
« Reply #12 on: June 04, 2013, 11:25:31 PM »
If it's a ratchet mechanism it works like a roll up window shade - when it's extended, pull it out slightly to release the ratchet, then let it retract quickly.

To lock it in the extended position, pull it out to where you want it, then let it rewind slowly a little bit until the ratchet catches.
« Last Edit: June 04, 2013, 11:27:24 PM by Lou Schneider »

jab2373

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Re: Shortning an Awning
« Reply #13 on: June 06, 2013, 11:37:19 AM »
Thanks will try