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Author Topic: Toy Hauler tie downs  (Read 3427 times)

Terrell1959

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  • 2006 Keystone Raptor 3712 Toy Hauler
Toy Hauler tie downs
« on: January 26, 2012, 06:09:26 PM »
My toy hauler has no tie downs installed in the garage.  Currently plan to haul 2 mopeds and grill that will need tie downs, but will probably also be hauling a 4 wheeler soon.  Suggestions on how and where to install would be greatly appreciated before I start drilling holes in the all the wrong places. 

Foto-n-T

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Re: Toy Hauler tie downs
« Reply #1 on: January 27, 2012, 09:43:00 AM »
It depends upon what your toy hauler is. Is the garage floor insulated or open? Is there a fuel tank under there somewhere? Is it OSB or "real" plywood and how thick? 5th wheel or TT?

Although we don't know the answers to the above questions yet, here's a couple of things to think about.

Mopeds don't weigh a lot by comparison to heavier motorcycles but don't make the mistake of thinking they aren't going to have a wild ride back there. If you're looking at using simply fold down rings you'll want to resist the urge to just screw them down into the decking, although some manufacturers have been guilty of this. Through bolts and fender washers to provide surface area underneath are highly recommended.  If the floor is OSB (which is more common that it should be) I would go the extra step of using a 6"x6" steel doubler under the floor as well. I actually had a bike fall through the floor of a rig that was decked with OSB!!

You can also install "E" tracks which will allow you to move your tie down anchor points to any point on the track, I currently use this system. Also keep in mind that you will want to secure the rear of the bikes as well, mainly to keep them from swinging.
Joe

2008 Victory Lane
1998 Freightliner FL50
Cody, WY when it's not covered in ice.

Joezeppy

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Re: Toy Hauler tie downs
« Reply #2 on: January 27, 2012, 11:50:49 AM »
I know nothing about toy haulers but I always figured tie-downs would be standard issue. Just shows you what I know. I guess depending on what you carry, maybe there is no "standard" layout of tie-downs that would work for everyone?

I wonder if the manual has any info on where to solidly install them?
Joe & Kim
Upstate NY - Kuyahoora Valley
2010 GMC Sierra 2500HD - 6.0L
2010 North Country 27BHS TT

Foto-n-T

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Re: Toy Hauler tie downs
« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2012, 12:33:35 PM »
A lot of toy haulers don't come with tie downs installed. Actually it's kind of nice to be able to customize them to your particular needs.
Joe

2008 Victory Lane
1998 Freightliner FL50
Cody, WY when it's not covered in ice.

denmarc

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Re: Toy Hauler tie downs
« Reply #4 on: January 29, 2012, 04:54:34 AM »
A lot of toy haulers don't come with tie downs installed. Actually it's kind of nice to be able to customize them to your particular needs.

I agree on two counts:
Customization is the kittys booty!  Just take the time to think about what you want to accomplish, lay it out, then build it.

E-Track works great!  I use it on my utility trailer to haul my quad and other various things.  The ability to put the straps where ever you want them is priceless.  Attachments available with rings for hooking the cheaper, light duty straps that you might purchase at the big box stores.  Works great for straping down the coolers, grill, gas cans, tool boxes, or other light cargo.

Floor composition is very important.  My utility trailer has 2 x 6 pressure treated lumber on steel cross members on 24" centers.  All SS hardware to secure the E-Track.  Plenty strong enough for anchor points.  If you are planning on hauling heavier items, such as a quad, make darn sure your anchor points are strong enough to withstand the load.  Foto-n-T is exactly right.  You wouldn't want the quad ripping loose on a panic stop if toy hauler floor is a thin OSB!
Mark

1994 Jayco Eagle 370FB on 24 acres of paid off paradise in Michigan.

Fantasy is a necessary ingredient in living.  It's a way of looking at life through the wrong end of a telescope.

Dr. Seuss

Foto-n-T

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Re: Toy Hauler tie downs
« Reply #5 on: January 29, 2012, 08:28:15 AM »
One BIG Draw Back To E-Track!!

This year on our way down south with the bike in the garage of the toy hauler we got a little wake-up call regarding our beloved E-Track tie down system.  The bike weighs 760 lbs. and because I've seen the result of broken straps before I use two front straps on each side to tie down, each attached to its own E-Track anchor plus one strap on each side of the rear to keep the back end from wandering around.

Every time we stop I do a load check regardless, it's just one of the things I'm anal about, like doing an exterior walk around and inspecting tires.  At one such rest/lunch stop I poked my head in through the garage door and found that one of the rear straps had failed and the bike had "wandered" off to the starboard side pretty severly.  It was still upright but it didn't look too good shall we say.

What I found was that the tie down strap was fine, what had failed was the ballistic nylon portion of the E-Track anchor where it connects the track lock to the tie down ring.  The track lock had basically "cut" through the ballistic nylon.

This track lock had been in use for approximately 3 1/2 years on a part time basis and had logged approximately 28,000 miles of use.  They don't last forever, keep an eye on them.
Joe

2008 Victory Lane
1998 Freightliner FL50
Cody, WY when it's not covered in ice.

denmarc

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Re: Toy Hauler tie downs
« Reply #6 on: January 29, 2012, 09:10:07 AM »
One BIG Draw Back To E-Track!!
This track lock had been in use for approximately 3 1/2 years on a part time basis and had logged approximately 28,000 miles of use.  They don't last forever, keep an eye on them.

Good point.  But keep in mind...
Inspection is the key!  Straps in good condition, proper installation of track and components, should do the trick for you.  My system has worked great for many years.  Any questionable components are replaced with new. 

I don't want to lose a 800 lb. quad on the freeway somewhere.
Mark

1994 Jayco Eagle 370FB on 24 acres of paid off paradise in Michigan.

Fantasy is a necessary ingredient in living.  It's a way of looking at life through the wrong end of a telescope.

Dr. Seuss

Foto-n-T

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Re: Toy Hauler tie downs
« Reply #7 on: January 29, 2012, 09:25:30 AM »
The interesting part of this failure is that it was not apparent from looking at the anchor that there was a problem.
Joe

2008 Victory Lane
1998 Freightliner FL50
Cody, WY when it's not covered in ice.

denmarc

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Re: Toy Hauler tie downs
« Reply #8 on: January 31, 2012, 10:30:41 AM »
The interesting part of this failure is that it was not apparent from looking at the anchor that there was a problem.

I'm curious...
Where/what are your anchor points?  I have 3-10' sections of E-Track running the length of my utility trailer.  All attached to the deck with 3/4" SS Panhead wood screws every 8 inches.  4 straps to hold the quad, plus any other cargo with additional straps. 
Mark

1994 Jayco Eagle 370FB on 24 acres of paid off paradise in Michigan.

Fantasy is a necessary ingredient in living.  It's a way of looking at life through the wrong end of a telescope.

Dr. Seuss

Foto-n-T

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Re: Toy Hauler tie downs
« Reply #9 on: February 01, 2012, 09:16:42 AM »
Quote from: denmarc
I'm curious...
Where/what are your anchor points?

Like yours, mine are simply screwed into the decking but...the decking is 7/8" plywood, not OSB.  You might have mis-understood where the failure occured.  It wasn't the E-Track anchor that failed, it was the ballistic nylon strap between the E-Track locking device and the "D" ring which my tie-down strap attaches to.

I think that one of the things that contributed to the failure was that this particular tie-down was for the rear of the bike.  When I load and strap the bike it DOES have a constant load on this strap, but as we go down the road the strap can work itself into a different position and slacken just a bit.  This would put a "sawing" type movement on the tie-down and if the road is rough might lead to failure.

Basically, you need to keep in mind that although quality tie-down straps are expensive, they don't last forever.  I tend to replace my primary straps about every two years. When those get replaced I usually put the old primary straps into the secondary position.

Just for info purposes:  Most of our hauling is carting around our 2006 Yamaha Stratoliner (about 800 lbs.).  We have used the rig to transport our Rhino though with a weight of 1,360 pounds, it puts us too close to GVWR if not over by a couple hundred pounds.
Joe

2008 Victory Lane
1998 Freightliner FL50
Cody, WY when it's not covered in ice.

denmarc

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Re: Toy Hauler tie downs
« Reply #10 on: February 02, 2012, 11:44:06 AM »
Like yours, mine are simply screwed into the decking but...the decking is 7/8" plywood, not OSB.  You might have mis-understood where the failure occured.  It wasn't the E-Track anchor that failed, it was the ballistic nylon strap between the E-Track locking device and the "D" ring which my tie-down strap attaches to.

I think that one of the things that contributed to the failure was that this particular tie-down was for the rear of the bike.  When I load and strap the bike it DOES have a constant load on this strap, but as we go down the road the strap can work itself into a different position and slacken just a bit.  This would put a "sawing" type movement on the tie-down and if the road is rough might lead to failure.

I think I understand now.  I am able to use the primary E-Track straps for securement.  Took a little bit to get the routine down to a science, but I got it down.  I do end up replacing a couple of straps every 2-3 years.  That's expected.  All in all, the system works great.
Mark

1994 Jayco Eagle 370FB on 24 acres of paid off paradise in Michigan.

Fantasy is a necessary ingredient in living.  It's a way of looking at life through the wrong end of a telescope.

Dr. Seuss