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Author Topic: Home toilet in RV  (Read 7907 times)

freebird0700

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Home toilet in RV
« on: February 07, 2012, 11:24:06 AM »
Hey, Can you use a home toilet in a class A motorhome? And if so how would you control water flow for flush?
RV dummie here.
Thanks

NY_Dutch

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Re: Home toilet in RV
« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2012, 11:49:13 AM »
Using a home style toilet in a motorhome is not something I would ever recommend. The first problem is the weight of the flush tank that's typically only held in place by two relatively small bolts. As the motorhome bounces and sways while underway, the porcelain bottom of the tank is not likely to survive for long. The second problem would be trying to keep water in the trap while underway, to keep the sewer gases from the holding tank out of your coach. There are several models of RV toilets that are very "home like" in that they have a porcelain bowl for easy cleaning, and also use standard residential toilet seats.
Dutch
2001 GBM Landau 34' Class A
F53 Chassis, Triton V10, TST TPMS
2011 Toyota RAV4 4WD/Remco pump
ReadyBrute Elite tow bar/Blue Ox base plate

donn

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Re: Home toilet in RV
« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2012, 11:49:47 AM »
Can it be installed?  Sure anything can be done.  Would a sane person want to?  NO!
A home toilet at best uses 1-1/2 gallons of water per flush.  A RV toilet uses maybe 1/2 gallon per flush.  Less if it is only pee.  Your holding tank would fill up 3 times faster using a home toilet.  There are two options if you do not like the low toilets standard in RV's.  first is an extended and the second is a new hi rise model toilet.  why not go that route?

utahclaimjumper

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Re: Home toilet in RV
« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2012, 12:30:22 PM »
In a home type toilet the extra water to flush is needed to get everything thru the "trap" at the bottom of the toilet,  RV types drop straight down into the tank without needing the trap to control gasses.>>>Dan
38' American Tradition/330 turbo Cummins
Jeep liberty 4 down
72 VW Baja 4 down
Cedar City, Utah
USAF vet. 59-63

freebird0700

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Re: Home toilet in RV
« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2012, 12:30:58 PM »
Thanks guys. I didn't think so but my brother-in-law said we could. Thanks again

Foto-n-T

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Re: Home toilet in RV
« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2012, 09:20:25 AM »
It would be interesting to say the least, maybe you should let him do it in HIS RV, not yours.  Other than using too much water what comes to my minds eye is the holding tank full of water going down the highway.  Every curve in the road will dump more water out of the tank onto your floor.  Not to worry though, sooner or later your fresh water tank would empty itself out trying to feed the toilet.

Sometimes trying to out-think the engineers isn't the best plan of action.
Joe

2008 Victory Lane
1998 Freightliner FL50
Cody, WY when it's not covered in ice.

Joezeppy

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Re: Home toilet in RV
« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2012, 09:53:25 AM »
Also, if your main motivation is get rid of the plastic, porcelin RV toilets are available.
Joe & Kim
Upstate NY - Kuyahoora Valley
2010 GMC Sierra 2500HD - 6.0L
2010 North Country 27BHS TT

Lady Fitzgerald

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  • Jeannie
Re: Home toilet in RV
« Reply #7 on: February 08, 2012, 09:56:11 AM »
I don't know why everyone is so worried about the weight of the water in the toilet tank breaking the toilet or splashing out, eventually emptying the fresh water tank. First, one shouldn't be traveling with the pump on except when actually using the fresh water system. Second, all one has to do to avoid either problem is to turn of the supply valve to the toilet and flush it. No more water in the toilet tank.

That said, a residential toilet would fill up the black tank faster because they use more water per flush. When on the road, water would slosh out of the toilet, either over the rim of the bowl or down the drain, which would break the water seal between the toilet and the black water tank allowing tank gasses to enter the RV.

The only way a residential toilet would be practical would be if the black tank was removed and replaced with a direct connection to the sewer. Even this would be a bit tricky because the drain and sewer lines between the toilet and the "hole in the ground" would have to consist of vertical drops and near horizontal runs with a slope of 1/4" per foot to ensure all waste drains properly. Too much slope will allow the water to run away from the solids, causing them to build up in the drain. Too little slope wouldn't promote enough water velocity to wash out the solids. Any dips in the line would trap solids, causing an eventual blockage. Maintaining that accuracy with a stinky slinky would be "fun."
Jeannie

Between RVs (to put it mildly) but planning on buying a TT to full time in.

Gary RV Roamer

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Re: Home toilet in RV
« Reply #8 on: February 08, 2012, 10:25:22 AM »
Park model RVs sometimes have residential toilets, but they don't have holding tanks and do have permanent sewer hook-ups. And they don't move around a lot either.

Gary
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Gary Brinck
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2007 GMC Acadia
Homebase: Ocala National Forest, FL

Lady Fitzgerald

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  • Jeannie
Re: Home toilet in RV
« Reply #9 on: February 08, 2012, 07:08:26 PM »
Park model RVs sometimes have residential toilets, but they don't have holding tanks and do have permanent sewer hook-ups. And they don't move around a lot either.

"And they don't move around a lot either." That is the key phrase.
Jeannie

Between RVs (to put it mildly) but planning on buying a TT to full time in.

John From Detroit

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Re: Home toilet in RV
« Reply #10 on: February 09, 2012, 09:32:02 AM »
I have not heard of it in a class A but in trailers they have what is called a "Park Model" no tanks, of any kind, designed to be hooked up to water and sewer in the park.

Now if you like the convience of a flush toilet instead of a gravety toilet, Dometic has several models of Macerator toilets (Tecma is one line) I have one, they work well but do use more water than I like for my 36 gallon waste tanks.   We use it when we have full hookups and use the SeaLand (Gravety type) when we have limited hookups. as we do not, which reminds me I need to water the rig today.
Nothing adds excitement like something that is none of your business
My Home is where I park it.

NY_Dutch

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Re: Home toilet in RV
« Reply #11 on: February 09, 2012, 11:10:43 AM »
In my opinion, "park models" are no more an RV than a 70' x 14' mobile home in a trailer park. The process to break one down and move it is essentially the same, with the possible exception of not needing an oversize permit. ::)
Dutch
2001 GBM Landau 34' Class A
F53 Chassis, Triton V10, TST TPMS
2011 Toyota RAV4 4WD/Remco pump
ReadyBrute Elite tow bar/Blue Ox base plate

Lady Fitzgerald

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  • Jeannie
Re: Home toilet in RV
« Reply #12 on: February 09, 2012, 11:29:20 AM »
In my opinion, "park models" are no more an RV than a 70' x 14' mobile home in a trailer park. The process to break one down and move it is essentially the same, with the possible exception of not needing an oversize permit. ::)

And this is a problem, why?
Jeannie

Between RVs (to put it mildly) but planning on buying a TT to full time in.

tvman44

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Re: Home toilet in RV
« Reply #13 on: February 09, 2012, 05:35:46 PM »
Uses too much water.

NY_Dutch

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Re: Home toilet in RV
« Reply #14 on: February 09, 2012, 06:08:56 PM »
And this is a problem, why?
I didn't say it was a problem. The difference does make comparisons to real RV's an apples and oranges situation though.
Dutch
2001 GBM Landau 34' Class A
F53 Chassis, Triton V10, TST TPMS
2011 Toyota RAV4 4WD/Remco pump
ReadyBrute Elite tow bar/Blue Ox base plate

Icemaker

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Re: Home toilet in RV
« Reply #15 on: February 09, 2012, 07:49:53 PM »
I didn't say it was a problem. The difference does make comparisons to real RV's an apples and oranges situation though.

This is a site of varied ideas, experiences & opinions. No one has to agree with any of them. Take what you like and leave the rest.
I look at this site as an RV buffet. Some choice meat and some eye-candy(that idea was kinda hard to express in type).
Besides ...12-21  ??? 12-22 ;)
George


94 Dolphin DP
99 CRV W/Blue Ox & Patriot Brakes
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F420661
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NY_Dutch

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Re: Home toilet in RV
« Reply #16 on: February 09, 2012, 09:24:10 PM »
This is a site of varied ideas, experiences & opinions. No one has to agree with any of them. Take what you like and leave the rest.
I look at this site as an RV buffet. Some choice meat and some eye-candy(that idea was kinda hard to express in type).
Besides ...12-21  ??? 12-22 ;)
Ok, and I expressed my opinion of park models. I have no idea what your last line is supposed to mean...
Dutch
2001 GBM Landau 34' Class A
F53 Chassis, Triton V10, TST TPMS
2011 Toyota RAV4 4WD/Remco pump
ReadyBrute Elite tow bar/Blue Ox base plate

SoEzzy

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Re: Home toilet in RV
« Reply #17 on: February 09, 2012, 09:59:49 PM »
Opinions are like... fill in the blank!

freebird0700 why do you want to change the toilet out?

If you want to leave the plastic toilets behind, and get a larger seating area, some of the Thetford line are reasonable sized china bowl models.

We installed one last fall, with a step for added height, it solved our dislike for the lower, smaller seating area plastic bowled toilets!

JM2C
1993 Gulf Stream Friendship 38' DP, Cummins 8.3 with an Allison 6 spead.

Icemaker

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Re: Home toilet in RV
« Reply #18 on: February 09, 2012, 11:10:22 PM »
Ok, and I expressed my opinion of park models. I have no idea what your last line is supposed to mean...

Dutch I kinda agree w/you...they're not my cup-of-tea...but some love them...hell some base-jump too, which is cool if you like that kinda thing just not for me..
The other is the Mayan Calender doomsday thingy...http://news.discovery.com/space/the-2012-mayan-calendar-doomsday-date-might-be-wrong.html ...
Basically the end is 12-21-12.... :-[ ...but if 12-22-12 comes around than... :)
George


94 Dolphin DP
99 CRV W/Blue Ox & Patriot Brakes
95 F-150 4X4 4.9
F420661
Fresno, Ohio most of the time

Marc L

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Re: Home toilet in RV
« Reply #19 on: February 10, 2012, 07:33:31 AM »
I don't have a park model, but use my trailer like one as I am seasonal.  In my opinion, a park model is to a cottage, what a double-wide is to a house.  And I don't have a problem with that.  I can't afford a cottage on a waterfront property.  I can afford a trailer and rent a seasonal waterfront lot.  It becomes a cheap cottage.

We have permanent hookups, but still have the holding tank, so I still need to use it like a regular RV with the black tank closed and only open it to dump. 

There are a lot of park models where I am setup, I'd say about half of them if not more have holding tanks.  I don't really understand why.  They also even have a battery, water pump, fresh water tank and lights on 12V.  I guess they can be setup on a vacant lot and just use a generator, lug water and a blue tote for dumping. 

Anyway, the problem with home style toilet is just the amount of water.  If you always have full hookup, it's not an issue other than having to dump more frequently.  I'd go with a nicer ceramic RV model myself.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2012, 07:36:49 AM by Marc L »
Marc...

NY_Dutch

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Re: Home toilet in RV
« Reply #20 on: February 10, 2012, 08:30:46 AM »
Dutch I kinda agree w/you...they're not my cup-of-tea...but some love them...hell some base-jump too, which is cool if you like that kinda thing just not for me..
The other is the Mayan Calender doomsday thingy...http://news.discovery.com/space/the-2012-mayan-calendar-doomsday-date-might-be-wrong.html ...
Basically the end is 12-21-12.... :-[ ...but if 12-22-12 comes around than... :)

Ahh! I forgot about that Mayan calendar nonsense. Thanks for clearing it up.  ;D
Dutch
2001 GBM Landau 34' Class A
F53 Chassis, Triton V10, TST TPMS
2011 Toyota RAV4 4WD/Remco pump
ReadyBrute Elite tow bar/Blue Ox base plate

John From Detroit

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Re: Home toilet in RV
« Reply #21 on: February 10, 2012, 10:04:17 AM »
Uses too much water.

Not so sure, Modern home toilets are "Water Saving" and likely use about the same as the Dometic Macerator models.

To the person who said that a Park model is not much different from a mobile home.... Fully agree.
Nothing adds excitement like something that is none of your business
My Home is where I park it.

Lou Schneider

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Re: Home toilet in RV
« Reply #22 on: February 10, 2012, 11:09:04 AM »
Quote
There are a lot of park models where I am setup, I'd say about half of them if not more have holding tanks.  I don't really understand why.  They also even have a battery, water pump, fresh water tank and lights on 12V.

It may have something to do with local covenants covering the campground.  The Escapees' Park Sierra co-op ran into that when they were building their park, in that the local government restricted them to only having self-contained RVs in the park.  CA has different eviction requirements for semi-permanent mobilehomes vs. easily relocated RVs.

Marc L

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Re: Home toilet in RV
« Reply #23 on: February 10, 2012, 11:21:55 AM »
Lou, the campround is in the boonies, there are no covenants for sure.  I was just talking on how they came from the factory with holding tanks.  Some of those without a holding tank removed them themselves.
Marc...

Lady Fitzgerald

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Re: Home toilet in RV
« Reply #24 on: February 10, 2012, 11:27:04 AM »
At least one manufacturer (Jayco) has park models that are fully self contained with water tanks, holding tanks, etc. that they refer to as destination models. These are longer and taller than most travel trailers but still can be towed with 3/4 or 1 ton trucks. Park models are not self contained. Both are shorter, narrower, and lighter than most mobile homes being made today and have sturdier frames (especially the destination models) so they can withstand being moved more often.

When I get the TT I plan on getting, I plan on converting it to a really small park model by, among other things, losing the tanks and replacing the toilet and refrigerator with residential models. The only times I'll move it will be in the Spring and Fall when I move it between the cooler high country in AZ (probably Flagstaff) and the warmer low country in the the Tempe/Mesa area so I want something small enough I can move it with a 1/2 ton truck instead of a fuel hogging like a 3/4 or 1 ton.
Jeannie

Between RVs (to put it mildly) but planning on buying a TT to full time in.

jje1960

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Re: Home toilet in RV
« Reply #25 on: February 10, 2012, 04:23:21 PM »
At least one manufacturer (Jayco) has park models that are fully self contained with water tanks, holding tanks, etc. that they refer to as destination models. These are longer and taller than most travel trailers but still can be towed with 3/4 or 1 ton trucks. Park models are not self contained. Both are shorter, narrower, and lighter than most mobile homes being made today and have sturdier frames (especially the destination models) so they can withstand being moved more often.

When I get the TT I plan on getting, I plan on converting it to a really small park model by, among other things, losing the tanks and replacing the toilet and refrigerator with residential models. The only times I'll move it will be in the Spring and Fall when I move it between the cooler high country in AZ (probably Flagstaff) and the warmer low country in the the Tempe/Mesa area so I want something small enough I can move it with a 1/2 ton truck instead of a fuel hogging like a 3/4 or 1 ton.
Hopefully, after making all the alterations, you don't end up with the same weight as a park model (and wish you had of just got a park model), which requires a "fuel hogging" like 3/4 or 1 ton... and that the TT frame can put up with all that customized weight.  Good luck on your modifications though, sounds like you have a plan!  Happy RV'ing! :)
Jim
2011 Ford F350 DRW 6.7 Diesel
2011 Cougar SRX

Lady Fitzgerald

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Re: Home toilet in RV
« Reply #26 on: February 10, 2012, 07:35:37 PM »
Hopefully, after making all the alterations, you don't end up with the same weight as a park model (and wish you had of just got a park model), which requires a "fuel hogging" like 3/4 or 1 ton... and that the TT frame can put up with all that customized weight.  Good luck on your modifications though, sounds like you have a plan!  Happy RV'ing! :)

Excellent points. The TT's GVW would be enough to limit how much weight would be added. The 'fridge would add between 80# to 280#, depending on if I get a side by side or a conventional top freezer, which isn't a big deal except it is in a slide so I would have to find out how much additional weight the slide could handle. A computer desk and associated goodies would add about 200# to the opposite slide which probably wouldn't be a problem since the existing kitchen slide appliances weigh around that much. A residential toilet (they can be obtained with triangular tanks for corner mounting) probably weigh less than 50# more than the porcelain RV toilet it would replace.

The part that worries me is adding a washer/dryer combo or individual washer and dryer. The weight isn't all that much but the back of the trailer is the only place available. That, along with the cabinetry needed, would put a lot of stress on the frame. Before I pull the trigger, I need to talk to some commercial trailer builders/welders about that. If it would be a problem, I might be able to have the frame fishplated to reinforce it. One advantage putting that weight back there is to reduce loaded tongue weight (it's 1400# when empty which is 16% of the total empty weight). I have a plan B in mind but I'm not real crazy about it. In the meantime, I'm still looking to see if anyone comes out with a better floorplan.
Jeannie

Between RVs (to put it mildly) but planning on buying a TT to full time in.