1/2 ton tow ability - trailer considerations

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rcragg

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May 29, 2019
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We are considering 2 different trailers, would be towing with a half ton
Just wanted to know your guys thoughts on tow ability

Truck
2017 Silverado Crew Cab, Short Box, 6.2L
Weights as per stickers inside door jambs
GVWR 7200 lbs
Payload 1374 lbs
Chevrolet claims 1690 lbs payload and 9100 towing capacity

Trailers
SUNSET TRAIL SS262BH
Dry Weight - 5423 lbs
GVWR - 7560 lbs
Hitch Weight - 568 lbs
30' 10" Length

SUNSET TRAIL SS288BH
Dry Weight - 5742 lbs
GVWR - 7600 lbs
Hitch Weight - 660 lbs
32' 9" Length

 

kportra

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Montana
I think you Could do it, but Shouldn't do it.  Don't count on not loading up the trailer - we all have good intentions there but nearly all of us slowly add weight.  Also your pickup will not be happy and will likely show wear and tear at an early age.  My opinion.
 

Roy M

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southern British Columbia
The loaded trailer will weigh close to or exceed the tow vehicle, it is a recipe for disaster. Where do you get a tow capacity of 9600 lb? I suspect from a brochure or GM website, that will be the maximum for any 1500 and not necessarily for your truck.
 

steveblonde

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calgary alberta
:yes you can no i wouldnt, you will be close in wieghts but i doubt over.  You will have some serious squat issues and the front end will be light making steering and braking harder. But the biggest issue is that giant sail behind you my 28ft almost dragged me off the road one day in my 1/2 ton and ive seen it happen. To me that take too much fun out of the whole adventure hills mountains etc you will struggle aswell
But yes it is doable
 

rcragg

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May 29, 2019
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appreciate the feedback


GM claims 9400 lbs towing capacity, sorry not 9100
Dry weights of the trailers are  between 5400-5800 lbs
Carrying capacity 1700 - 2000 lbs

I got the GVWR by adding the dry weight and carrying weights - although I don't see us taking 1800 lbs of stuff for weekend trips
 

SpencerPJ

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That 6.2 is a nice engine, I've been considering one as well.  But as you, after the real production of your truck, the installed extras take away from the payload, and the payload comes out a bit less than I want, I want 1700# or more.  You can do it with that truck, what you will not like with that big of a trailer is how much the wind pushes around a 1/2 ton, like a ragdoll in a high wind.  I think you would be a whole lot happier with a 25' trailer, and a dry weight around 5500#, that would get you around 6500 after loaded and a hitch (weekend camping stuff).  That 650# tongue weight, plus another passenger or two, a little firewood, etc, you will get to 1300# payload pretty quick, and who wants a maxed out truck?  GM 9100# tow spec, is a flatbed trailer with steel even distributed.  Not the same as a box on wheels attempting to cut through the wind.
 

grashley

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Western Kentucky
Welcome to the Forum!

To explain your weights - and THANKS FOR ALL THE NUMBERS!

The stickers on the door jamb apply to YOUR truck.  Use those numbers!

The Chevy claims    numbers mean they make a truck similar to yours with those specs.  It is a bare naked, base model,  no options except tow package truck.  It carries 2  passengers at 150# each for max tow, full fuel tank, no added passengers, and no cargo in the truck.  Max Payload includes NO options and no passengers.

The trailer weights - ignore dry wt.  It is useless except for towing it from the manufacturer to the dealer.  When you get it loaded for camping, it will weigh much closer to GVWR.  Your GVWR calculation is correct.  Use this for your estimates.  Hitch wt numbers are equally useless.  Use 10% - 12% of GVWR for a much better hitch wt estimates.

Your truck can carry 1374# of stuff.  This includes all passengers (NOT included in Payload, just Tow capacity), car seats, cargo, WD hitch (80#), hitch wt, tools, firewood and toys carried in the truck.

In your case, this is 800# - 900#  hitch wt, 80# hitch, which leaves only 400# - 500# for passengers and all cargo.  Hopefully, this puts solid figures behind what others have said.
 

scale obsession

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As others have stated, use the sticker on the door jam. Claimed numbers aren't good for much. Because once you've got the vehicle, its yours, and if you find out it won't work for your needs, things just became very expensive.

Those trailers will have that 1500 right at its max. I've learned to always go overkill. I've never met anyone that said they had too much truck. I've been under trucked and it was a very uncomfortable experience. So I would either scale by the trailer, or go larger on the truck. Remember, once you've got the truck, that investments made. If you ever decide you want a larger trailer down the road, your tow vehicle is already on hand.
 

RGP

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Dec 21, 2017
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Here are my numbers, you can judge.

Positives
F-150, Eboust, 350+ hp, 1411 payload and towing package. We have towed 40,000 miles in six years. Excellent performance in the desert, Rockies, plains, Interstate and back roads with 9.5 to 10.0 mpg.

Negatives
My 25 ft. 5000# dry weight Dutchmen TT crosses the CAT scales at 6200# when loaded for the road. It has 750# tongue weight and with two adults a large dog and gear it put the truck at its max cargo.

Towing near the cargo limit increases wear and tear. It takes it toll on brakes, shocks, suspension but few folks tow 8000 to 10,000 miles a year.

The question comes down to, do you want the increase maintenance cost of heavy towing or the increased cost of maintaining a bigger truck.

Personally I like my F-150, others would opt for bigger.
 

RVRAC

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I had a similar TV pulling a 26ft.  That was plenty.  For the length and weight you are looking for you need  2500 truck.
 

aguablanco

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Mesa, AZ
I have a Ram 1500 EcoDiesel and tow a 24' trailer weighing ~6000 loaded and I would be very hesitant to go bigger. I towed this rig with my 2012 Silverado 1500 5.3 engine and it was a struggle to get up hills. The mileage was only ~9.8 compared to the Ram's 15.5. A bigger truck or smaller trailer is in your future.
RichH
 

rcragg

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May 29, 2019
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Would this unit be any better on the towing side

Weight 5082 lbs
CC 1418 lbs
GVWR 6500 lbs
Hitch Weight 630 lbs
28'10" Total Length


thanks for all the feedback
 

SpencerPJ

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Personally, I think you would be ok with those numbers on that trailer.  I know your goal is to get as much trailer as your truck can handle.  The 6.2L will handle it fine, always be aware of your payload, pack only pots and pans you will use (unlike us ::))  I would travel with little water, fill at campground, etc..
I know a guy with a similar truck as yours, 26' Coleman TT, so probably 29', and says his truck pulls it fine.  He just stays aware.   
 

rcragg

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May 29, 2019
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if payload was at 1800-2000 lbs would that make any of these trailers more manageable

my truck lease is up soon, potentially could look at getting a higher payload half ton or move to 2500
2500 wont fit in my garage which makes it less desirable
 

SpencerPJ

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Higher payload = stiffer truck, tows better.  A 2500 stiffer yet.  It's hard finding a 1500 with a higher payload, seems when you start getting nicer trim packages, add-ons, sunroofs etc start killing the payload.  Many claim the Ford F150 has better payloads, and the turbo v6 pull well. Many order the options and trims that meet their criteria too. I've started looking at Expeditions, tow 9000# and I saw one with a tow package with 1700 payload.  You can always buy the trailer you really want, and if the truck doesn't work well, and you can trade in on your lease, upgrade to make yourself happy. 
 

grashley

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A different truck changes EVERYTHING!  The weight calculations do not change, but new GVWR and payload numbers are now in play.

As Spencer said, higher trim, more options, bigger cab and / or bed, 4X4 all add weight.  As such, all lower Payload.  NEVER use published payload numbers.  ALWAYS look at the yellow placard.

It seems Ford has dropped their HDPP, so max payload for any F150 is about 2300# by my memory.  This will be bare bones XL reg cab.

To increase payload, you must either settle for a truck with fewer conveniences on a ? ton truck or step up to a ? ton truck.  This will generally add around 1000# of payload to similarly sized and equipped trucks.  Make sure to check the yellow placard.  The ? ton are only slightly larger physically and do ride a bit rougher when empty.  If you have no plans to upgrade the trailer before this lease expires, then there is no need to consider 1 ton trucks.  If you anticipate upgrading to a FW while you still have this truck, the 1 ton may be a better option.
 
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