2004 Gulf Stream independence question.

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Billybobby

New member
Joined
May 17, 2022
Posts
2
Location
Decatur
Hello, A local lady is selling a 2004 Gulf Stream independence 29ft class c. This would be my first time looking at a class c and am looking for some advice or things to look for when I go check this out.

2004 Gulfstream Independence
New lower price $19000
29' with one slide with awning
V10 motor
Great for camping and traveling
72485 miles
Everything runs and works well except the generator
which would not start this spring
Tires are great, New batteries
Daybed with twin popup trundle
Queen bed in back
Overhead bed in front
Sleeps 5
Full refrigerator
Small table and bench

Here is info that I have. It has been for sale for a few weeks which makes me wonder if it’s priced kinda high? Also is there any common problems with these that I should be looking for?

Thanks.
 

Henry J Fate

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 14, 2018
Posts
1,979
Check the date code on the tires. Not the tread depth which is probably good as you indicated. Anything over 6 years means replacement time is here or very soon depending on what you plan to do with the rv. The generator is a $4000 item. Check the number of hours on it. If it is not running, get it running and if not, take $4000 off your planned offer. Make sure everything is working. It is not easy to do that and takes time and knowledge. It may be good to bring someone along that is familiar with all the systems. Check the battery dates and if its been sitting without charging, chances are you will need all new batteries.

Look for any signs of water leaks on the ceiling and inside cabinets. Check for any signs of water damage on the floor. Soft spots on the floor usually is a sign of water damage. Check all the cabinets, draws and doors for proper operation.

Look underneath for any signs of fluid leaks on the vehicle and on the ground where it has been sitting. Check all the fluids in the engine. Ask for any service records that there may be. Start the vehicle up and get it to running temp. Make sure it is not burning oil or smoking. Make sure the transmission is shifting properly and check the transmission fluid after it is warmed up, driven and still running.

When I bought my first RV almost 35 years ago I was fairly confident I could trouble shoot and fix any house system so I brought a mechanic who checked the chassis out for me and I was good to go but I did get the coach for a very good price so I was prepared to absorb any system replacements.

I am guessing that it is a buyers market with the current fuel costs and inflation so take that into consideration when making an offer. The vehicle is 18 years old with a fair amount of miles on it. Find out how many owners and where it was owned and used.
 
Last edited:

Octodad

Active member
Joined
Apr 8, 2022
Posts
39
Location
Augusta, KS
If you have an android phone or tablet, an app that can be really helpful is RV Checklist by Adventure Treks LLC. It has a big list of things that you should check. It does not give details of exactly what you should check them for (like Henry J Fate does above), but at least lists the things to check. I found it really helpful in buying my TT.

Something to consider is that the V10 is possibly a Ford. If so, and probably the same for all V10 manufacturers, mileage will maybe be in the 10mpg range at best. 7mpg is not uncommon. 72k miles isn't necessarily high on the V10 engine, but the 18 years old can mean a lot of worn gaskets, hoses, etc., especially stuff made of plastic.

To Henry J's point, 72k miles is a lot of bouncing and jostling for cabinets, joints, etc., inside the coach. A lot of settling and movement will take place in those miles. Be sure to check the slide and inspect it inside and out both open and closed.

It you are handy, most things are fixable. If not, prepare for $ when something breaks, which it will if it is not already.

Best wishes and ask lots of questions here. I only joined recently, but have been reading for a while. Folks are really knowledgeable and love to share their experience. It has helped me immensely.
 

Larry N.

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Joined
May 26, 2010
Posts
9,145
Location
Westminster, Colorado
In addition to the above, you might check our RESOURCES section (in the thick red line above) for "Buying An RV" and "Checklists" where you may find some good suggestions.
 

Billybobby

New member
Joined
May 17, 2022
Posts
2
Location
Decatur
Thanks you guys for the reply’s. The checking cabinets and drawers wasn’t something I had thought of. And I’ll check out the resources area and do some more research.
 

Mark_K5LXP

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Joined
Nov 17, 2018
Posts
2,466
Location
Albuquerque, NM
Condition, condition, condition. Pictures and a text description won't show damage, stains, odors and general overall wear and tear. Not that it has to be pristine but some RV's I've looked at were downright nasty, others had just seen better days, some you can't believe it's in such good shape. Some issues you might be OK with addressing like maybe some shot upholstery or worn carpet but water damage is the big one. When I bought mine I physically climbed up on the roof looking for sealant issues, popped the AC vent off inside and looked around in there, looked at the ceiling inside every cabinet, checked every window for stains and delamination. Given the price point there's limited opportunity for negotiation but consider tires and batteries as "bad" until proven otherwise, and deduct for that. Test everything and reconcile any operational anomaly. A nonfunctional light might be just a bulb but it might be indicating more. Anything with a knob or handle gets turned or pulled. Loose? Stuck? Broken? People tend to focus on the major stuff like engine and transmission, but odds are those are OK. What will likely be wonky is steering alignment, brakes and dash A/C. Not that even these are deal breakers but you want to know up front what you'd be in for when you adopt it. Try to look past the "features" and "pretty" and focus on condition and function. When something gets to be this old you're reaching the limits of useful life for some of the structure and equipment, so it comes down to how much service you expect for the amount you're spending.

Mark B.
Albuquerque, NM
 
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