2004 Skyline Nomad Park Furnace

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Aquafuzz

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Sep 26, 2021
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South Carolina
Just picked up an 04 Nomad park model that has been used only during the summer months and the furnace has not been turned on for 7 years.

There is no 12vdc system in this camper. There is a 110vac cord coming from the furnace and a couple of wires running to the thermostat. The propane valve at the furnace has been turned off this whole time as far as I know.

Is there a startup procedure to a checklist to go over before firing it off?

Is there anything to check as far as the ignition system to ensure it’s sparking?

Anything to check with the blower system?

Just trying not to blow myself up.
 

Kirk

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Oct 30, 2005
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Brand and model of the furnace would help to answer your questions. In an RV the furnace is 12V & propane but most manufacturers also make a 120V version that is often found in the same service manuals. Also with the make/model there is a good chance we can find an operators manual that you can download.
 

Lou Schneider

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Mar 14, 2005
Posts
11,167
Yes, verify the furnace make and model before you plug it in! If you can't do that, I'd take the power to a 12 volt battery and see if the blower runs a few seconds after you turn on the thermostat or short the thermostat wires (same thing).

If the blower doesn't run, plug it into 120 volts and try it again.

Shortly after you get the fan running you should hear the click of the gas valve and the sparker trying to ignite the flame. Shut it down again, turn on the propane valve and check for leaks.

The start-up sequence is the thermostat calls for power, the fan starts and when it comes up to speed it trips an airflow switch. If the sail switch successfully closes the furnace then turns on the gas and starts sparking to ignite it. If the sail switch doesn't close or the flame fails to ignite the fan will continue running a minute or so to get rid of any accumulated gas fumes. Or it will continue running until the thermostat turns off.
 

Aquafuzz

New member
Joined
Sep 26, 2021
Posts
4
Location
South Carolina
Brand and model of the furnace would help to answer your questions. In an RV the furnace is 12V & propane but most manufacturers also make a 120V version that is often found in the same service manuals. Also with the make/model there is a good chance we can find an operators manual that you can download.
Thanks, I'll be back at the camper in a few weeks and I will dig up a Brand and Model and report back.
 

Aquafuzz

New member
Joined
Sep 26, 2021
Posts
4
Location
South Carolina
Yes, verify the furnace make and model before you plug it in! If you can't do that, I'd take the power to a 12 volt battery and see if the blower runs a few seconds after you turn on the thermostat or short the thermostat wires (same thing).

If the blower doesn't run, plug it into 120 volts and try it again.

Shortly after you get the fan running you should hear the click of the gas valve and the sparker trying to ignite the flame. Shut it down again, turn on the propane valve and check for leaks.

The start-up sequence is the thermostat calls for power, the fan starts and when it comes up to speed it trips an airflow switch. If the sail switch successfully closes the furnace then turns on the gas and starts sparking to ignite it. If the sail switch doesn't close or the flame fails to ignite the fan will continue running a minute or so to get rid of any accumulated gas fumes. Or it will continue running until the thermostat turns off.
Thanks for the basics. Ive used similar systems that ran on diesel and were 12vdc only systems. Just wasnt sure the operation was the same, sound real close. I'll be back at the camper in a few weeks and I will dig up a Brand and Model and report back.
 

Aquafuzz

New member
Joined
Sep 26, 2021
Posts
4
Location
South Carolina
5205B068-C59C-4E50-850E-68D4DFBF0144.jpeg32DE4FC7-06E9-4412-B9C0-E79777C20EAB.jpeg38A987FE-B061-4EEA-AA0E-1EBCEA485DDA.jpegBrand and model of the furnace would help to answer your questions. In an RV the furnace is 12V & propane but most manufacturers also make a 120V version that is often found in the same service manuals. Also with the make/model there is a good chance we can find an operators manual that you can download.
The model is an Atwood 8940-111-ACLC furnace. There are two blue wires that ran to my thermostat and a 110 plug. One blue wire was connected to a red wire labeled RH at the thermostat and the other was connected to white wire to the thermostat.

I have the furnace out and at home and want to bench test, what do I connect to the blue wires?
 

Kirk

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Oct 30, 2005
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979
Location
Full-time , Escapee
I looked up your furnace and yours is a 120V-alternating current model as that is what the AC means in the model. The LC means that it comes set for burning propane but could be converter to natural gas, which the LP models can not. If you download this service manual from Bryant RV Service, you will find that on page 7 there is an explanation for the model designators. (8940-111-ACLC)
what do I connect to the blue wires?
The two blue wires normally would attach to a mechanical thermostat and to call for heat the two contacts close. In bench testing, if you have the furnace connected to 120V power, shorting the two together will act as the thermostat closing and the blower should start to run and then after a delay the gas valve will open and the ignition probe will spark. You can confirm this by looking on page 12 of the service manual once downloaded.
 
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