91 Winnebago Transmission cooling line

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FrazyTrain

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Good evening all,
I just bought a 91 Winnebago Warrior 23’. On the trip home the steel transmission cooling line cracked. Where would be the best place to find a replacement( I have been looking online with no luck)?
Would it be fine to get one custom made or even swap out and use rubber hosing instead?
 

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Non-partic

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I had this happen to a old van I once owned, and the transmission shop was kind enough to build me a new copper line for $150. It's easy if you have a flare tool and you can reuse those nut's on the end.

TIPS

* Use some PB blaster and let it soak overnight. Then remove the nuts.

* If you don't have a transmission shop or don't want to (or can't) drive/tow the car to the shop, then you can remove the old line and take it to a hydraulic shop and they will make you a flexible hose to fit... and you are back in business.

* Do not use hose clamps and a flexible hose unless you have to. I.e., cut the line and insert a 2" flexible hose. And see if it leaks?
 
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Non-partic

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If after you remove the broken copper line, you might be able to take it to an hydraulic shop and they can insert a coupling ...at that break... to match the line dimensions so you can reinstall it. TBD.

Lot's of options here.

And if this is a low pressure line, which I think it is, then I want to correct what I said earlier. In this case, you can even use a low grade hose... with nipples that have a ferrule lip on the end... with a hose clamp. Or you can flare your old copper line ends and use a flexible hose with hose clamps. (It's the lip that counts and prevents the line from leaking.)

Wait a minute. Here's a better idea: Take the line off... clean it with 92% alcohol... scratch the copper tube up a bit, and then and get some plumbing "fix-it" tape at Walmart that shrinks and creates an epoxy seal. Then reinstall it.

I think Napa might have a fuel line repair kit too. IDK. Good luck!
 
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Gary RV_Wizard

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What the others said - components like that are typically fabricated to order from stock tubing. Old-fashioned auto parts stores (think NAPA or Carquest rather than Autozone) often do it, or independent repair shops, or hydraulic system shops or a/c repair shops. Bring in the old one so they can match the length and bends as well as the tube size and fittings.
 

dktool

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There is no issue with using proper hose for this, overall I would be more concerned with all the corrosion everywhere which lead to this leak and likely others will follow.

And to those who mentioned this line being copper, it is steel.
 

Non-partic

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Good point to the line being steel or aluminum possibly? That makes sense now that you mention it.

I'm guessing the metal on metal when combined with vibration created the leak? ...But it really does not mater.

The point being: If anyone experiences a line repair... it's not that hard or expensive to fix, more than likely. I mention this, because every owner can feel overwhelmed at times when repairs start to stack up.

I'm very capable of fixing most everything on my RV, but I still find myself saying: "What now?" ...And then there is some sings of relief. ...And the pleasure of DIY.
 

Non-partic

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BTY, this could be your opportunity to flush your transmission fluid since the transmission cooler is really just a return line to the pan.

What am I talking about? Well, you just need 2 people and do these things:

* Best when the engine is cold.

1) Drain the fluid out of your transmission pan. Measure it. Then replace it with the same amount of new ATF that is right for your vehicle. (And now you have new ATF in your transmission pan.)

2) Connect 2 drain lines up to your broken tranny cooler return lines(s) and let both of them drain in to 2 milk jugs.

3) Since you know how many quarts of ATF your tranny pan holds, because you drained it (let's say 4 qts) ...then you have your "helper" start the engine while you fill the empty milk jugs with old ATF... and then you stop at 3.8 qts or so.

Note: One jug will fill up with old ATF when you start the engine (and let the tranny pump the old out of the cooler line) and the other jug will not expel any fluid since the line is disconnected. (Measure what you take out and write it down on paper so you don't lose track.)

4) Now, refill the tranny pan with new ATF... and repeat these steps until you capture your TOTAL SYSTEM quantity of ATF in your milk jugs. ...And at this end point you will see the ATF color change from dirty (hopefully not smelly ATF) to a brighter, clearer red ATF color.

Note: This is the BEST way to change your ATF in any vehicle. And if you so choose you may elect to replace your tranny filter.

Note: I would never use a so called professional shop to use one of their pump systems to change ATF in any high mileage car, because there is some probability (20% let say, or 1:5) that you will end up with tranny problems after that flush.

This may sound a little "hillbilly" but once you do it the way I described you will start using this ATF flush method on all your cars.
 

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FrazyTrain

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Thank you everyone for the replies. Heading to a hydraulic shop to get one made. Then will do a transmission flush.
 

FrazyTrain

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Here is a picture of the fitting. The hydraulic place I went to hasn’t seen this fitting and questioned if it was actually for an AC unit.
When it was leaking it was red fluid coming out.
Im now very confused.
 

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Gary RV_Wizard

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There are some refrigerants that are red-ish in color but none that would have been used in a 1991-vintage a/c system.

Isn't the line visible enough to determine its function? Tranny cooling line runs from tranny to lower radiator and back.
 

FrazyTrain

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There are some refrigerants that are red-ish in color but none that would have been used in a 1991-vintage a/c system.

Isn't the line visible enough to determine its function? Tranny cooling line runs from tranny to lower radiator and back.
It is the tranny cooling line. No one in my area has the proper fitting.
 

dktool

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Now I'm really going to add confusion...
Those lines are actually ENGINE oil cooling.
Follow the hoses reward, they will transition back to metal and connect to the cooling adapter between the oil filter and the engine block.

Here's pics from my 1992 P30 7.4
The engine oil cooling loop on mine occupies the bottom 4 rows of the a/c condenser.
Your is likely the same, just a different condenser style.

Anyway..confirm where the lines lead to, it is possible someone macgyvered it and reconfigured the plumbing and now it is a trans cooler.

20220622_120839.jpg20220622_120747.jpg
 
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FrazyTrain

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Nanaimo
Now I'm really going to add confusion...
Those lines are actually ENGINE oil cooling.
Follow the hoses reward, they will transition back to metal and connect to the cooling adapter between the oil filter and the engine block.

Here's pics from my 1992 P30 7.4
The engine oil cooling loop on mine occupies the bottom 4 rows of the a/c condenser.
Your is likely the same, just a different condenser style.

Anyway..confirm where the lines lead to, it is possible someone macgyvered it and reconfigured the plumbing and now it is a trans cooler.

View attachment 154982View attachment 154983
Oh boy, the bottom bracket looks the same, but the lines on mine go opposite ways. Below is a picture of what the line on the passenger side connects too.
 

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Non-partic

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Oil cooler, huh? ...I doubt it, but if it is an oil cooler you would not see any pink.

And if the ATF is that black it probably will smell burned. Does it? It is an old coach and very few people think they need to replace their transmission ATF for some reason. "If it ain't broke, don't fix it" ...is not a universal saying.

Note: Oil coolers can be aftermarket, but I doubt you have one. Let us know what you have.
 

CharlesinGA

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Here's pics from my 1992 P30 7.4
The engine oil cooling loop on mine occupies the bottom 4 rows of the a/c condenser.
Your is likely the same, just a different condenser style.
View attachment 154983

Stumbling onto a engine oil cooler (or even a tranny cooler) COMBINED with a A/C condenser, would really leave me scratching my head :confused:. I have never seen anything like that. I wonder what junior GM engineer thought of that?

Charles
 
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