Advice on possible purchase of new travel trailer and if our towing vehicle is sufficient. Thanks so much for any advice!

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Dgw

New member
Joined
Nov 27, 2021
Posts
4
Location
Canada
TV:
2019 F-150 4x4 Supercrew
145” Wheelbase
2.7L V6 Ecoboost Engine / 325 h.p.
Electronic 10-SPD Auto transmission
3.73 ratio Rear Axle
FX4 Off Road Package
XLT Sport Package
Payload Package . Trailer Tow Package
GVWR: 6900
Payload: 1637
Max tow capacity : 8900

TT:
Freedom Express 252RBS
UVW: 5,822 lbs.
CCC: 1,778 lbs.
GVWR: 7,600 lbs.
Hitch: 672
 

MoInEd

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Joined
May 27, 2020
Posts
81
Location
Edmonton, AB
Hello and welcome.
Short answer is: marginally depending how you load the trailer and truck. Payload is the total on the hitch plus everything else in the truck (people, cargo, stuff!). Hitch weight listed is likely dry. You should consider around 12% or more of GVWR for the hitch (so upwards of 900lb). so that leaves you with about 700 or so for everything in the truck. As a rule of thumb I try to stay no more than 80% of rating. Beyond that your tow vehicle will struggle....
 

donn

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Joined
Nov 8, 2009
Posts
5,293
Paper is just that. What does yourTV actually scale ready to go?
 

Dgw

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Joined
Nov 27, 2021
Posts
4
Location
Canada
Thank you, that sounds promising , am I sensing a but? We are new to a bigger trailer ( previously towed a PUP ).
The numbers look ok? I’m worried maybe we are pushing too close to max limits.
 

steelmooch

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Joined
Aug 5, 2010
Posts
275
There are some very knowledgeable folks on here who will give you great info.

In my/our experience, we would not want to go that close to the max rating, especially on a "quarter-ton" chassis.

We've also got an 8,800 tow rating, on a 7,700 lb 3500 platform, equipped with a tow package and manual/proportional brake controller setup.

You never even knew the 3,500 lb (dry weight) camper was there. The 4,300 lb (dry weight) trailer handles well. The 5,500 (dry weight) made me glad I was in the foothills of the Apppalachians a couple of times and not in the Rockies when it was loaded up and I had a long ascent/descent or someone pulled out too close to me.

If you *do* push that close to your max tow capacity, consider getting the Mountain Directory road grade guide and be careful about your routes.

Happy travels!
 

Dgw

New member
Joined
Nov 27, 2021
Posts
4
Location
Canada
Paper is just that. What does yourTV actually scale ready to go?
We have added up our items to approx 1230lbs. Just a guess though as that is with the hitch weight from the trailer specs. ( which I am learning could be misleading ?)
 

Dgw

New member
Joined
Nov 27, 2021
Posts
4
Location
Canada
Hello and welcome.
Short answer is: marginally depending how you load the trailer and truck. Payload is the total on the hitch plus everything else in the truck (people, cargo, stuff!). Hitch weight listed is likely dry. You should consider around 12% or more of GVWR for the hitch (so upwards of 900lb). so that leaves you with about 700 or so for everything in the truck. As a rule of thumb I try to stay no more than 80% of rating. Beyond that your tow vehicle will struggle....
Thank you for this ( it’s what I was afraid of! ) we love this trailer but not enough to be stressing about safety and not enjoying the ride while towing. I suppose it’s time to seriously think about a truck upgrade or a trailer downgrade!
 

SpencerPJ

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Joined
Nov 1, 2017
Posts
3,973
Location
Midwest
People do as you all the time on the Ford forums. I'm pretty sure they are the young kind with trucks on a lease. I have a 2020 F150, 3.5, maxtow, 1760 available payload, and that trailer you discuss, would be at the absolute upper end of what I would do in the fairly level land of the Midwest USA. Get into hilly country, na, mountain country, no way. Just my opinion, as I say others will and do it. I like a little peddle to get on the freeway, and a little truck to navigate the morons that continuously cut us off.
 

Pretty flamingo

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Joined
Jan 24, 2022
Posts
1
Location
Austin tx
We just traded in our Ford F150 lease and purchased a Ram 2500. We have a 26RBS. We scraped the driveway moving out and hope that it won't anymore. Although it didn't feel like anything was behind us being towed, most of the time, we felt it struggled with heavier loads for longer trips and the trucks knocked us around on the freeway. We also had a blue ox weight distribution system installed by the rv dealer to match up the rv to the truck.
 

steveblonde

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 8, 2015
Posts
4,394
Location
calgary alberta
TV:
2019 F-150 4x4 Supercrew
145” Wheelbase
2.7L V6 Ecoboost Engine / 325 h.p.
Electronic 10-SPD Auto transmission
3.73 ratio Rear Axle
FX4 Off Road Package
XLT Sport Package
Payload Package . Trailer Tow Package
GVWR: 6900
Payload: 1637
Max tow capacity : 8900

TT:
Freedom Express 252RBS
UVW: 5,822 lbs.
CCC: 1,778 lbs.
GVWR: 7,600 lbs.
Hitch: 672
At 12% of gvwr on the trailer hitch your 912lbs that leaves 625lbs for you misses kids etc IF that payload number is the actual truck number off the door jam.
If you load the truck with more people gear than 625 you are digging a hole. Only true way to find out is load you and the trailer and scale it.
So when i say your golden its just you and a loaded trailer it has no bunks so im guess its just you and partner
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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Feb 2, 2005
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75,898
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Looking to buy a new home
The only "but" I see is that the trailer UVW, CCC, and Hitch (tongue) weight are paper estimates rather than real life (measured on your actual trailer). The figures in a brochure or website spec sheet are almost always somewhat inaccurate. The spec numbers are for the most basic configuration of that trailer and often obsolete or a pre-production estimate. The actual trailer you get will likely have some extras (e.g. a "mandatory option") that add weight to the UVW and reduce the CCC. The Hitch Weight needs to be 10%-12% of the actual loaded trailer weight to insure good towing manners.

If this trailer is at the dealer lot, you can get measured UVW and the final GVWR from the rating plate/sticker on the trailer itself. That will be specific to the actual trailer, not a general sales thing, and is required by federal law to be accurate. Then assume the hitch weight will be 10% of the trailer GVWR and do your arithmetic using those numbers. I think you will still be fine, so I wouldn't worry much.
 

MoInEd

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Joined
May 27, 2020
Posts
81
Location
Edmonton, AB
If you decide to go with this trailer try to n
Thank you for this ( it’s what I was afraid of! ) we love this trailer but not enough to be stressing about safety and not enjoying the ride while towing. I suppose it’s time to seriously think about a truck upgrade or a trailer downgrade!
I think if you are careful how you load your trailer and truck you should be Ok; don't put too much weight in the front storage of the trailer (that will increase the hitch weight). Don't put too much extra in the truck to go over payload. Then your truck can still safely tow it though it will not like hills or windy roads much and you need to be careful.
 

donn

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Joined
Nov 8, 2009
Posts
5,293
We have added up our items to approx 1230lbs. Just a guess though as that is with the hitch weight from the trailer specs. ( which I am learning could be misleading ?)
Well, I was kind of short with my reply. Sorry.
What I was Illuting to was how much weight do you have on the truck? And guesses don't count. Load it up like your going camping and drive across a set of scales. Now at home subtract that from your trucks GVWR, which is 6900 pounds. That gives you how much payload you have for hitch.
Gross ready to hitch weight of the proposed trailer will be 12-15% of the trailers GVWR. Rough guess it's going to be 800 pounds or so. Now on top of that you have the smallest motor available, so while towing on the flat lands might be OK, when you encounter any hills you will not be a happy camper. Remember with your pop up there was very little wind resistance. With a high wall TT your going to encounter a lot of wind resistance which is going to only make a marginal weight much worse.
 

PerroSucio

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Joined
Jul 18, 2021
Posts
42
Location
Winnipeg, Manitoba
My trailer has similar specs with respect to CGVW. I pull mine with a 2010 Tundra SR5 5.7 litre, and we are at the trucks weight limits, and our trailer is loaded to capacity. I’m happy with my trucks pulling performance at the upper end of its capacity. I think you may struggle on hills of any size, but time will tell. If you like the trailer, don’t go smaller, buy more truck…..
 

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joester

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 30, 2006
Posts
415
Location
Tempe, Arizona
TV:
2019 F-150 4x4 Supercrew
145” Wheelbase
2.7L V6 Ecoboost Engine / 325 h.p.
Electronic 10-SPD Auto transmission
3.73 ratio Rear Axle
FX4 Off Road Package
XLT Sport Package
Payload Package . Trailer Tow Package
GVWR: 6900
Payload: 1637
Max tow capacity : 8900

TT:
Freedom Express 252RBS
UVW: 5,822 lbs.
CCC: 1,778 lbs.
GVWR: 7,600 lbs.
Hitch: 672
Just to clarify - the Trailer Tow Package is NOT the Heavy Duty Payload Package (HDPP) - that's not available with that engine/wheelbase combo.
 

Bearcatrp

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Joined
Jul 11, 2019
Posts
94
Good replies above. Anytime your pulling close to max weight, your pull vehicle will suffer. Get ready for early maintenance bills. If you like your trailer, upgrade the pull vehicle. Until then, drive cautiously and take your time pulling.
 

IBTripping

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Joined
Sep 19, 2018
Posts
1,655
Location
Virginia
The maximum weight of the trailer is 7600. Tongue weight at 10% is 760 lbs. Weight Distribution Hitch (WDH) with anti-sway is about 80 lbs. bringing up the tongue weight to 820 lbs. Your tow vehicle has 325 hp and a ten speed transmission. If your numbers are accurate and you don't overload the truck, I believe your setup is safe. You'll slow down going up hills as others have noted. I'd be comfortable that towing situation, although I'd prefer the 3.5 engine.
 

Ex-Calif

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Joined
May 15, 2020
Posts
2,820
Location
NorthCentral Florida
My trailer has similar specs with respect to CGVW. I pull mine with a 2010 Tundra SR5 5.7 litre, and we are at the trucks weight limits, and our trailer is loaded to capacity. I’m happy with my trucks pulling performance at the upper end of its capacity. I think you may struggle on hills of any size, but time will tell. If you like the trailer, don’t go smaller, buy more truck…..
I am with this post. On paper you can tow it. I generally think 24 feet is the upper and on a 3/4 ton truck but I would buy it, try it and if you aren't comfortable then shop a new truck.

I see no reason to subtract a "safety margin" from manufacturers specs. If anything they go conservative. Your truck also has a decent wheelbase which helps drivability.

I'd be more concerned on a short wheel base SUV.
 
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