All Electric/solar RV

The friendliest place on the web for anyone with an RV or an interest in RVing!
If you have answers, please help by responding to the unanswered posts.

JayArr

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 13, 2020
Posts
786
Location
Mission British Columbia Canada
They built a prototype in Europe and took it for a test run.

The Stella Vita is designed for two passengers and has a kitchen, sitting area, bed, shower and toilet. Using solar energy alone, the vehicle can cover up to 450 miles on a sunny day, reaching a top speed of 75mph, as well as powering all the inside amenities, a TV and a laptop

 

DonTom

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 21, 2005
Posts
4,934
Location
Auburn, CA or Reno, NV
"Using solar energy alone, the vehicle can cover up to 450 miles on a sunny day, reaching a top speed of 75mph,"

Sound like vaporware to me. I don't buy it being possible under solar alone, unless they had a something like a quarter mile of it.

-Don- Reno, NV
 

Rob&Deryl

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 27, 2017
Posts
1,610
Location
On the road from mid NH
I assume they start will full batteries but use solar to supliment while driving. Should be easy to put 1200 watts of panels on a roof if roof layout was designed for it.
 

crawford 111

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 23, 2021
Posts
207
Location
dandridge,TN
you did see how little it was right ? I don't think in most cases it would work here more so with a family maybe little people LOL
 

Ex-Calif

Well-known member
Joined
May 15, 2020
Posts
1,869
>>A team of students from the Netherlands are due to complete an 1,800-mile (3,000km) road trip across western Europe in a solar-powered camper van that they designed and built themselves.<<

When I saw that lead under the photo for some reason I immediately thought "Clown Car."

22 kids are gonna be real friendly on that trip - LOL...
 

NY_Dutch

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 22, 2010
Posts
7,152
Location
Where our wheels take us!
"Using solar energy alone, the vehicle can cover up to 450 miles on a sunny day, reaching a top speed of 75mph,"

Sound like vaporware to me. I don't buy it being possible under solar alone, unless they had a something like a quarter mile of it.

-Don- Reno, NV
Apparently two students have been on the road with the vehicle for nearly a month winding up the 1,800 mile trip. I would like to see a breakdown of how often they had to use shorepower for recharging versus solar, but kudos to the entire team for the design and build. I don't think I've seen any solar vehicle that I'd call "beautiful", but I certainly can appreciate what went into developing the concept and carrying it out. The interior certainly looks nice...
 

Viajeros

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 19, 2015
Posts
669
Apparently two students have been on the road with the vehicle for nearly a month winding up the 1,800 mile trip. I would like to see a breakdown of how often they had to use shorepower for recharging versus solar, but kudos to the entire team for the design and build. I don't think I've seen any solar vehicle that I'd call "beautiful", but I certainly can appreciate what went into developing the concept and carrying it out. The interior certainly looks nice...
Nice to see young engineers doing projects like this. Great life experiences and good source of real works data for for other students. I remember those days well, but our projects weren’t near as cool.
Kudos guys.
 

DonTom

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 21, 2005
Posts
4,934
Location
Auburn, CA or Reno, NV
Should be easy to put 1200 watts of panels on a roof if roof layout was designed for it.
That's why I call BS. Even my electric motorcycles will take more than 3KW just to slowly move. Even to maintain a freeway speed going downhill will take around 3KW. And that's on a motorcycle.

1.2KW just ain't going to help much.

My smallest electric motorcycle (the one I take with my RV) can charge at 1.3KW using the OBC (on-board charger). It's a small 7 KWH battery. It will take 5 hours to fully charge at 1300 watts with the bike not being used.

Does that 1.2KW of solar sound like a lot when it is using above 20 KW during a slow ride?

Just doesn't add up that to solar can help much while driving.

However, with several long breaks (hours), 1300W during daylight can help a little.

-Don- Reno, NV
 

NY_Dutch

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 22, 2010
Posts
7,152
Location
Where our wheels take us!
Keep in mind, this is the same university that has built a number of solar powered vehicles entered in the 1,864 mile (3,000 km) Bridgestone World Solar Challenge event since 2013, winning their class in two consecutive events.

 

NY_Dutch

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 22, 2010
Posts
7,152
Location
Where our wheels take us!
Not solar powered. Not even possible.

Solar-assisted a little is the best possible you can get with solar added to a vehicle.

-Don- Reno, NV
When solar power is the primary energy source used to propel the vehicle and charge the batteries, what would you call it? Did you read the requirements for the Bridgestone World Solar Challenge?
 

NY_Dutch

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 22, 2010
Posts
7,152
Location
Where our wheels take us!
I would call it at least 20,000 continuous watts of solar--just for a motorcycle. Any vehicle larger would need more.

-Don- Reno, NV
Are you claiming the Eindhoven University of Technology team, Bridgestone, and all the other various companies involved with the design and development of these vehicles are clueless? Maybe you could learn a little from this link:

 

Lou Schneider

Site Team
Joined
Mar 14, 2005
Posts
11,279
For comparison, 1.2 Kw is the output of a small Honda generator. Or in absolute terms, about 1.6 HP since 1 HP = 745 watts. How far/fast will that move any vehicle down the road?

As a clue, the European Solar Racing challenge referenced above using very lightweight and aerodynamic solar powered vehicles had an average lap speed of 25 MPH - 1000 km average distance over 24 hours. And most vehicles stopped for a quick recharge during the night when their solar panels were (obviously) not producing power.
 

Viajeros

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 19, 2015
Posts
669
Lets not get 1.2 KW charging capacity with a 1 Kwh of power. I kwh will take a 4000 pound modern electric vehicle down the road about 6.4 kilometres. (That is our lifetime average for our car) A vehicle that is more aerodynamically designed could go much further than that. And lets also keep in mind that this is a learning tool for young university engineers. Kinda cool.
 
Last edited:

Viajeros

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 19, 2015
Posts
669
>>A team of students from the Netherlands are due to complete an 1,800-mile (3,000km) road trip across western Europe in a solar-powered camper van that they designed and built themselves.<<

When I saw that lead under the photo for some reason I immediately thought "Clown Car."

22 kids are gonna be real friendly on that trip - LOL...
There are only two people in the vehicle.
 

DonTom

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 21, 2005
Posts
4,934
Location
Auburn, CA or Reno, NV
fackAre you claiming the Eindhoven University of Technology team, Bridgestone, and all the other various companies involved with the design and development of these vehicles are clueless?
Facts are facts regardless of who says otherwise. The numbers do not add up and that is a fact. That's all I am saying.

Or have we recently invented perpetual motion machines? Or discovered Ohms Law isn't true?

-Don- Reno, NV
 
Top Bottom