Amsoil?

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cerd

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I have heard that Amsoil can reduce resistance without sacrificing lubrication and protection. Would it be worth replacing all fluids with Amsoil? Its about 30% more expensive than other brands such as Mobil, which is my go to. I have a small class C MH and my daily driver is a 2005 Durango AWD. Both are getting old enough that I should change diff fluid and oil. Transmission fluids are fine.
 
That's largely old news, comparing the synthetic Amsoil to natural (aka "dinosaur") oil products.  Amsoil is no better than any other quality synthetic oil product, so if you prefer Mobil, use Mobil 1 synthetic instead.
 
I have a slightly different opinion, in that I feel these premium synthetics may in some applications be slightly better than the mainstream synthetics, like Mobil One, though if the slight improvement vs. the added cost is worth it probably depends on the individual and the applications.  For fluids that rarely get changed / hard to change, like diff and transmission, I think it is probably worth the price premium.

For engine oil, pick any good synthetic
 
Amsoil used to have a killer warranty/guarante but I'm not sure the terms were not written so filing a claim was not possible.. That's all I can say about 'em.

I use a 'Durablend' type myself.
 
The last filter and fluid change on my Allison transmission (40K ago) I used Amsoil Torque Drive and noticed the difference immediately.. Shifts are smoother,, temps are cooler and overall a good solid feeling trans particularly when climbing.>>>Dan
 
2005, I would use OEM Diff fluid.  Oil: I use a semi-synthetic.  I've heard some older vehicles don't do well going to a full synthetic.  Trust me, I am a huge fan of Mobil 1 full synthetic in our newer cars, but I won't put it in my 2005 YukonXL.  Personally I use Pennzoil High mileage, it's a blend, and does well.  My automatic change oil % thing in my electronics would probably allow me to go 4000 miles, even though on this Yukon, I still change at 3000 ish miles.
 
I am a long time Amsoil user and became a dealer a few years ago, dont sell a lot, mostly friends and family.
I will tell you there is a difference  in synthetic oils. There are 3 grades of synthetic oil base stocks, group 3, 4 and 5. Group 3 is more or less  highly refined petroleum oil, in much of Europe,  group 3 can not be labeled as synthetic, but it is allowed in the US.
Group 3 is what makes up the majority of the major oil brands  "synthetic" oil, this includes Mobil1, Castrol,  Valvoline, Pennsoil, and Quaker State, along with the store brands. They may use a small percentage of group 4 or 5 to suplement their formula.
Amsoil uses a majority group 4 in their premium products, so it is one of the few  true  synthetics left. It may have some amount of group 3 used as an additive carrier.
Group 5 is ester based and is what is used in jet engines due to its stability at extreme temperatures. It is not used as much in automotive oil, although Redline oil uses a certain amount in their oil, and there may be a small percent in some of the better synthetics used as a cleaning additive.
What percentages of group 3, 4, and 5 is a "trade secret" so the manufacturers wont tell you exactly what is in their formula. The info I am sharing is based of my general knowledge of the industry, and what I have seen in oil analysis reports over the years.

I have Amsoil Signature series in my engines, their severe gear 75w140 in my trucks rear diff, and their 2 stroke oil in my chainsaw  and weed eater. Even run their small engine oil in the lawn mower. It is good stuff!
If you get the preferred  customer account, you get 25% off the retail price and free shipping on orders over $100, so it could really be worth while if you are switching the whole truck over!
 
One caveat to the 2005 is that it takes 7.5qts per oil change. I have been using Mobil 1 from Walmart, but since it's $10/quart, I have been buying 2x 5 quart jugs since it's cheaper between 2 changes. Supposedly, Amsoil can last 25k miles (with regular filter changes at 5k, or they say their filters last up to 25k miles). I was going to split the difference and go to 15k miles per their severe duty recommended schedule.

So to stick with Mobil:
$90/3 jugs of oil + $16/2 filters= $53/oil change every 5k miles or $159 every 15k miles.

If I use Amsoil (including 25% preferred customer discount)
$9*8qts+$15filter= $87/15k miles according to their severe duty recommendations, even though I'm probably not that hard on my equipment. (90% of my driving is highway and I only let it idle in winter) Without the discount, it would be $116.

The Amsoil filter is rated for up to 25k miles, so I figured that I should be able to change it at 15k miles at the same time as the oil instead of regular filters at 5k and having to top off the oil.

**I already use full synthetic oil due to cold winters (-60F this past year), but I do have a high mileage vehicle, so I was also going to get an oil analysis kit from Napa to see how my current oil compares. In theory, Amsoil is going to be cheaper for the same, if not higher quality oil, so I am going to try it and get an oil analysis at 7500 and at 15k miles.
 
I've heard some older vehicles don't do well going to a full synthetic.

The "older vehicles" referenced here are more like 1970's than 2005. Back in the day it was said that some of the seals & gaskets used in older models were not compatible with synthetics.  The evidence for that was largely anecdotal, though it was possible to demonstrate the possibility in a lab test. In any case, the auto engineers have long since upgraded materials to avoid any problem.

The other piece of this deals with high mileage vehicles that never had synthetic fluids before. Some types of oily sludge that accumulate over time can be loosened by the increased lubricity of synthetics and it's possible that this dirt won't get filtered out before causing some additional wear. It's another thing that can be demonstrated in a lab but whose practical importance is debatable.
 
LOL! I knew the Amsoil fans would crap all over me for saying their baby is of merely average beauty. The Koni shock fans do the same. Replace those cruddy OEM filters with a K&N and put nitrogen in the tires and your RV will be instantly transformed.  ;) ;) ;)
 
Gary RV_Wizard said:
Back in the day it was said that some of the seals & gaskets used in older models were not compatible with synthetics. 
Years ago, I heard an interview with an oil manufacturer specializing in racing and vintage motor oils. Unfortunately, it was a few years ago and I don't remember who it was or the name of the company. It was on the Carcast podcast with Adam Carolla.

The oil guy was saying that it isn't that the engines are incompatible, but that the gaskets and seals get conditioned to whatever oil is used. If you use conventional for 10 years, then switch to synthetic, it will probably develop a leak. Likewise, if somebody uses synthetic for a decade, then suddenly starts to use conventional for whatever reason, it will probably leak then too.

A lot of people say they haven't had an issue and others have, so its really hard to say if its true or not. Nobody is willing to invest in that kind of study since it has already been proven that synthetic oils reduce wear.

Gary RV_Wizard said:
Replace those cruddy OEM filters with a K&N and put nitrogen in the tires and your RV will be instantly transformed.  ;) ;) ;)
I was going to stick with OEM filters because they have been proven to keep an engine going for over 300k. K&N is probably better, but I am not sure how much better it could be.

Is nitrogen really worth it? Nobody in my area has the equipment for a proper nitrogen fill, so I would probably have to do it myself and if I need to service my tires, I am also limited to where I can do it. It probably isn't worth it in my daily driver, but maybe my MH.
 
Cerd, I think Gary's comment about K&N filters and nitrogen were tongue-in-cheek.
 
I can't attest to the value of amsoil in a motorhome, but I can attest to its value in cars and small engines. My company I work for uses amsoil in all our delivery vans and we run 15,000 miles on them. You do have to change the filters at 5,000 miles, but don't worry about the amsoil filter, a regular wix will work fine. Amsoil is just over the bridge in Wisconsin from us and we pick up our oil in bulk from them. When asked if we needed their filters the guy said that it's just a wix filter with an amsoil logo. I switched my truck over to amsoil and I can now run pretty much a year between changes (I don't put a lot of miles on). I also swapped my ATV's to their oil and differential lube. I can say for certain those engines run cooler now, and can also run longer between changes. I'm a believer in their product.
 
Gary RV_Wizard said:
That's largely old news, comparing the synthetic Amsoil to natural (aka "dinosaur") oil products.  Amsoil is no better than any other quality synthetic oil product, so if you prefer Mobil, use Mobil 1 synthetic instead.

Agree with this. 
 
The oil guy was saying that it isn't that the engines are incompatible, but that the gaskets and seals get conditioned to whatever oil is used. If you use conventional for 10 years, then switch to synthetic, it will probably develop a leak. Likewise, if somebody uses synthetic for a decade, then suddenly starts to use conventional for whatever reason, it will probably leak then too.
Yeah, it was demonstrated in tests that a saturated seal would swell or shrink a bit when exposed to a different grade or type of oil. Ergo, leaks could occur.  The debate is whether that possibility of a leak should be termed probably or conceivably. Again, the evidence concerning real life effects is anecdotal - Fred changed to synthetic last oil change and now he has a leak.  Post hoc, ergo propter hoc (false logic). The best you can conclude is that you avoid any possibility of this sort of thing by never changing oil type.  The problem is the situation that 72cougar described - different oil stocks & blends in different brands will have the same effect to one degree or another.  So maybe you should never change from Chevron to Castrol either.  ???
I can't attest to the value of amsoil in a motorhome, but I can attest to its value in cars and small engines. My company I work for uses amsoil in all our delivery vans and we run 15,000 miles on them. You do have to change the filters at 5,000 miles,
Actually, the only thing you can really attest to is that regular oil & filter changes with quality products is effective maintenance. Whether Amsoil had any positive effect vs some other oil, synthetic or otherwise, remains unknown. Maybe the same procedure using Halvoline dino oil would yield the same vehicle life at lower costs?  Can't tell from the data.  It takes years and careful documentation to determine that, so conclusive studies are rare. Big fleets have done comparative studies to show if synthetics are worth the extra cost and the results are mixed, seeming to show that subtle differences in vehicle usage or operating conditions has as much effect as oil type.
 
Gary RV_Wizard said:
Actually, the only thing you can really attest to is that regular oil & filter changes with quality products is effective maintenance. Whether Amsoil had any positive effect vs some other oil, synthetic or otherwise, remains unknown. Maybe the same procedure using Halvoline dino oil would yield the same vehicle life at lower costs?  Can't tell from the data.  It takes years and careful documentation to determine that, so conclusive studies are rare. Big fleets have done comparative studies to show if synthetics are worth the extra cost and the results are mixed, seeming to show that subtle differences in vehicle usage or operating conditions has as much effect as oil type.
That is why I was going to have oil analysis tests done. I currently have Mobil 1 in my car. I will take an oil sample from this oil when I change it. I will try Amsoil for my next oil change and will take another oil analysis once I reach the same mileage. I realize that it will have traces of the old Mobil in it, but it should give me an idea of whether Amsoil is bogus or not.

Jkoht said:
You do have to change the filters at 5,000 miles, but don't worry about the amsoil filter, a regular wix will work fine.
From their website:

When used in conjunction with AMSOIL synthetic motor oils, AMSOIL Ea Oil Filters are guaranteed for extended service life:

    Ea Filters designated with product code Ea15K are recommended for 15,000 miles/one year, whichever comes first, in normal or severe service.
    Ea Filters designated with product code EaO are recommended for 25,000 miles/one year, whichever comes first, in normal service or 15,000 miles/one year, whichever comes first, in severe service.

This makes me question which part is invalid. Wix only guarantees their filters for the recommended oil change interval, which I doubt is more than 7500 miles, which is the longest recommended service life that I have seen. Most are 5000 miles. It would be silly for Amsoil to guarantee a product for longer than the manufacturer.
 
To each their own but I continue to use brand name dino oil that meets the SAE and API service classification recommended for my vehicle. As far as I am concerned all this hype for Amsoil and other high priced lubricants is all about making money, I have not seen any scientific results that consistently prove otherwise. It's like so called organic food, now there's a marketing scam. Just my 2 cents CAD.
 
Ford says change oil every 10k miles or 1 year on my 2018 Edge. They use semi-synthetic  oil and their own brand of filter in their Quick Lane lube places.
 
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