Awnings

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MTRancher

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Has anyone had any experience with the 'Awnbrella' support rods. I'm looking to find something which will allow me more use of my awning without a huge fear of losing it in the wind. My awning is 18' long and it just seems it could use extra support.
Thanks.
 

Jim Dick

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MTRancher said:
Has anyone had any experience with the 'Awnbrella' support rods. I'm looking to find something which will allow me more use of my awning without a huge fear of losing it in the wind. My awning is 18' long and it just seems it could use extra support.
Thanks.

I have not seen the support rods you mention. I feel no matter what you use the threat of wind damage is still very real. There are many different ways to tie down an awning but it only hinders the ability to raise it quickly during heavy winds. The added supports might be helpful but the original supports are only aluminum. It doesn't take too much to bend large arms such as those on the big awnings.

I have window awnings all around the coach. I don't think I've used our big awning more than once or twice in 6 years. The shorter arms on window awnings are not as "fragile" as the large arms so can take a little more abuse from wind. They are also very easy to roll up if the wind gets to bad.

 
M

MTRancher

Guest
Thanks Jim;
    I would be very skeptical of anything that would hinder a speedy roll up of the awning in high winds. Some of the advertised testimonies claim they can stay open in all but severe winds; plus they are supposed to aid in rain run off.
    I'm a little surprised no one else has come up with alternative suggestions. I would think with all the full timers out there, some of them have some tricks with their awnings.
    I'm still looking for ideas!
 

Tom

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MTRancher said:
I would think with all the full timers out there, some of them have some tricks with their awnings.

I suspect that the the trick most folks found through experience and continue to use is to avoid leaving the awning out/up in high winds. Another trick to aid rain runoff when the awning is out is to tilt ot to one side slightly; It won't look pretty, but will help the rain run off.
 

edjunior

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Roman Forest, TX.
And trust me, you really want the rain to run off.  We had a freak storm blow through while we were out sightseeing once, and we left the awning out.  When we came back, we had a swimming pool.  It took me a little bit to get the water out, being very careful not to do anything to break or rip anything.  I'm surprised it didn't stretch the awning where it was unuseable.  Probably because it was still so new.  We learned a lot on that trip!

Oh, and here's a link to the Awnbrella:

http://www.americanmadeawnings.com/news.htm
 

Jim Dick

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MTRancher said:
Thanks Jim;
    I would be very skeptical of anything that would hinder a speedy roll up of the awning in high winds. Some of the advertised testimonies claim they can stay open in all but severe winds; plus they are supposed to aid in rain run off.
    I'm a little surprised no one else has come up with alternative suggestions. I would think with all the full timers out there, some of them have some tricks with their awnings.
    I'm still looking for ideas!

One thing I've done is make sure any coach we buy has window awnings all around. That way I can open those awnings and leave the windows open. Rain won't get in and they are much less affected by wind. Having said that, a couple of years ago we were parked on the desert with the Brewers. They had gone to Long Beach for a couple of days and left the coach with the window awnings out. We had a terrible wind storm that night. Around 7:00am I realized that the flags were really blowing so I went out to lower them. It was a struggle. I then noticed one of Terry's window awnings had partially rolled up. I had to walk with my head lowered to keep the sand from beating my face up. :) I got a ladder and went back to try to raise the awning. When I released the pull the wind started to lift me off the ladder! It took about 10 minutes before I was able to get the awning back in place. Now imagine trying that with the big awning!!!

As Tom mentioned you can dip the awning slightly so the rain will run off quickly. It's still taking a chance but it helps.

 

Gary RV_Wizard

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I've noticed that a lot of fulltimers seldom deploy their awnings, so maybe that explains the lack of responses.  And another factor: tall motorhomes and fifth wheels seldom have a water drainage problem - the upper end of the awning is mounted high enough so there is plenty of pitch for water run-off.  Trabel trailers, Class B and sometimes Class C's typically have the awning mounted lower and thus it is nearly level when deployed at a height that will still clear heads. Awning rafters are perhaps a help in that situation, providing some runoff assist.

Many of us use awning "de-flappers", clips that attach to the side edges of the fabric and provide some tension laterally.  That is pretty effective in stopping awning flap in light-to-moderate winds.  They also help keep a "belly" from forming near the center in a heavy rain. If the winds are too much for de-flappers and the basic awning arms, you ougth to be rolling it up anyway.  NOTHING is going to keep that huge sail down once a high wind gets under it, including those tie-downs you often see.

In short, none of us think the support rods (aka "rafters") are going to be one iota of help in any significant wind.  And it appears they would hinder you in attempting to roll up the awning if a thunderstorm suddenly appears.
 
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