Be Careful Out There

The friendliest place on the web for anyone with an RV or an interest in RVing!
If you have answers, please help by responding to the unanswered posts.

Mark_K5LXP

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 17, 2018
Posts
973
Location
Albuquerque, NM
Yeah, "HT" harkens back to the 1960's when Motorola trademarked their handheld transceivers with that name (spelled Handie Talkie). Kinda like Kleenex and Xerox it's ubiquitous now for handheld transceiver.

Being one to hike during camping trips, being prepared is high on my list. I carry three HT's, one dual bander, one FRS and a "spare" packed in a waterproof box. Some might say one radio can do all but there's safety in numbers. If I drop one, get it wet or if I need to hand one off to someone to use, I have options. Not just radios, I have a full complement of "when all else fails" stuff in a backpack that I never leave the campsite without.

Over the years the most important safety technique I use is telling someone where I'm going and when I'll be back. Doesn't take a lot - twist an ankle, take a wrong fork in a trail, weather, problems along the way, and you don't show up. Knowing at least where you started and where you were going is a huge factor in finding you if you don't make it out.

Closest I've come is the trail was harder than I figured and I was late to the pickup point. My XYL (DW to RV folk) is also a ham and it was a simple matter to call on the prescribed frequency and let her know I was OK and still on my way. What would've been a time for her to consider whether to call the county sheriff or not turned into just a relaxing wait in the car until I showed up.

Wasn't my hike but among a group of hams I know one of them was on a hike in the Pecos near Santa Fe, NM. Our group was monitoring the statewide repeater network for his daily call in. I heard him call a bit earlier than expected, he had come across a group on horseback that had an injured rider. He was in shock and they were trying to get him to aid as quickly as possible. I called the Santa Fe sheriff's office and relayed to them where the group was and what trailhead they were heading to, and EMS met them there. There's no cell service anywhere around there but the statewide ham repeater network in NM covers into the boonies pretty well, and in this case at a minimum gave this group some peace of mind that help was waiting for them.

Mark B.
Albuquerque, NM
 

Sooeycute

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 16, 2021
Posts
61
Location
Florida
Anybody hiking, biking or offroading in the back country should have one of these. Cheap insurance. One goes in my pack every time.

 
Last edited:

DonTom

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 21, 2005
Posts
3,266
Location
Auburn, CA or Reno, NV or Cold Springs Valley, NV
What’s a HT? Ham Transmitter?
Handy Talkie, but yeah a portable hand held transceiver, but not necessarily on the ham bands.

BTW, the very best thing you could have out in the middle of nowhere is either a Spot Messenger or an inReach. Two way communications with the inReach. I have both. I won't leave home without both.

Both have a SOS button. They decide who to send by your location which is sent automatically. It would even work in the middle of the ocean as well as the desert.

For any REAL emergency. All you need is sky.

-Don- Cold Springs Valley, NV
 

DonTom

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 21, 2005
Posts
3,266
Location
Auburn, CA or Reno, NV or Cold Springs Valley, NV
Spot is a great device.
Including for calling a tow truck where there is NO cell service at all.

I have even used it in Toronto, Ontario, Canada when my RV broke down in year 2013. They arrived in ten minutes. My PAYG V W/L cell would not work in Canada, so the Spot came in handy.

-Don- Cold Springs Valley, NV
 
Last edited:

Jeff in Ferndale Wa

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 9, 2014
Posts
618
Location
Ferndale, Washington
Anybody hiking, biking or offroading in the back country should have one of these. Cheap insurance. One goes in my pack every time.


I got a SPOT many years ago when I found myself about a hundred miles north of Hyder Alaska on my Goldwing.
I was riding alone and suddenly realized that if something went wrong there was no one in the world that would know where to even start looking for me.
I've never had to use the emergency services,but would often send my current location to my wife,or post it on Facebook.
 

DonTom

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 21, 2005
Posts
3,266
Location
Auburn, CA or Reno, NV or Cold Springs Valley, NV
Most large national parks, national forest and BLM lands don't have cell service
I wonder what happened at Death Valley National Park. I was there last November. Cell worked for voice but not for the internet.

But I was also there three years ago, exact same location, boondocked at the Sunset RV camp and the internet was fine from there then, with the same V W/L portable Hotspot.

-Don- Auburn, CA
 

DaubsNU1

Member
Joined
Jan 26, 2021
Posts
24
Location
Eastern Nebraska
Garmin In-Reach...it goes with me on every hunting trip, vacation, hiking, etc.

It's any where from $14 to $65 per month, based on features you want. I activate during hunting season, has SOS, check-in, texting features. Pretty neat device.

I deer hunt in some remote areas...In-Reach gives me and the Mrs. peace of mind.
 
Top Bottom