Ben-Jen aka Benifer newbies

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If the OP is staying in Michigan for the winter, consider getting a propane supplier to set a 100 lb or better tank next to the trailer and connecting it to the system so you won't be chasing propane all the time. As you are 30 amp, you will probably need to run the water heater on LP some to free up power for the microwave, etc and by spring you will have used the 100 lb tank and be ready to hit the road.

Charles
 
If the OP is staying in Michigan for the winter, consider getting a propane supplier to set a 100 lb or better tank next to the trailer and connecting it to the system so you won't be chasing propane all the time. As you are 30 amp, you will probably need to run the water heater on LP some to free up power for the microwave, etc and by spring you will have used the 100 lb tank and be ready to hit the road.

Charles
I'm willing to bet that 100# will last less than a month trying to maintain a livable temperature day and night, even if they're willing to let the inside temp drop considerably at night.
 
I agree. In that climate, I'd go for a 300# LP tank unless maybe I also had plenty of power available for electric space heaters.
Agreed, but they only have 30A to spread out among everything. I would do as you suggest and just rent one of those 250 - 300 gallon horizontal tanks and keep that furnace churning and burning during the day, then drop the thermostat to about 60 at night.

I lived in a S&B place about 30 years ago that had a 250/gal tank for the stove, WH and furnace. I went through that propane about every 12 weeks, but I also had a wood stove as a back-up. If it weren't for that, I'd have gone through it more than twice as fast. And I didn't live in MI, I lived in N. CA. It still got down into the low 20's at night, but it was back to 50 during the day and it never snowed.
 
I'm willing to bet that 100# will last less than a month trying to maintain a livable temperature day and night, even if they're willing to let the inside temp drop considerably at night.
We use our Montana High Country (41 feet long) fifth wheel through out the Winter. When temps drop down to about 20 degrees or less, it is not uncommon for us to run through a 30 pound propane tank in 2 days (48 hours).

Granted, my Montana is set up so about 50% of the heat generated out of the furnace blows under the floor to keep things from freezing, and THAT's a lot of empty space, but the fact be told, at this rate, we can easily burn up 100 pounds of propane in 1 week.

Michigan winters are more brutal than central Indiana too.
 
I have nothing to add to the already great suggestions to the OP to make his project doable. Having the original sales brochure is a real bonus with it showing all of the weights and measures for his rig. From a glance, it looks like his 14K# weight comment looks like that is the gross combined weight of his rig.
 
We use our Montana High Country (41 feet long) fifth wheel through out the Winter. When temps drop down to about 20 degrees or less, it is not uncommon for us to run through a 30 pound propane tank in 2 days (48 hours).
We often camped in fall weather and my cold weather propane heat experience is similar. RV furnaces are rather wasteful of heat and the poor RV insulation requires a lot of furnace run time to maintain the set temperature. Those factors combine to make the LP consumption rate very high.
 
I have nothing to add to the already great suggestions to the OP to make his project doable. Having the original sales brochure is a real bonus with it showing all of the weights and measures for his rig. From a glance, it looks like his 14K# weight comment looks like that is the gross combined weight of his rig.
Not possible to have only a 14k# GCVWR. Looking at the specs for a 30-foot 2004 Jayco Designer series 5th-wheel, the trailer alone weighs at least 11k - 12k pounds. That leaves only 2 - 3 thousand pounds for the truck's GVWR, and the GVWR for a 2002 Chevy 2500 HD is 9200#. So, as I mentioned in Post #11, the max towing cap for that truck is 12k#. That means that towing cap is already maxed out even with an empty trailer. The max cargo cap is 4000#, so with an almost 3000# pin weight (20+% of 14k#) the payload is about maxed out also.

I hate to be the harbinger of bad news, but I think the OP bought way more trailer than his truck can handle. A 5th-wheel that heavy needs a 3500 series truck. Possibly why he hasn't been back for 3 days.
 
Depending on the empty weight of the trailer, if it has a high CCC they could try to limit the load somewhat. It will probably do OK. A gasoline 2002 model hopefully has a 8.1L (496 cu/in) big block and a 5 speed Allison transmission. Rear axle gross weight will be the limiting factor. Heaviest 5th wheel in the brochure is 14,000 GVWR and that means a pin weight of about 2800 to 3000 lb which is, I suspect, just about the limit of what the truck will carry on the hitch. May not be overloaded but will be fully loaded.

He actually stated 30 ft but was probably going by the model number. the only model number 30 is the 30RKS with a 12,500 gross weight and he certainly would not have issues with that. Personally I would have wanted a diesel (rust free) at almost all cost. Even the older ones will get you there better than gas.

OP has not been logged in since 2 pm Monday but might have lurked without logging in.

Charles
 
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Depending on the empty weight of the trailer, if it has a high CCC they could try to limit the load somewhat. It will probably do OK. A gasoline 2002 model hopefully has a 8.1L (496 cu/in) big block and a 5 speed Allison transmission. Rear axle gross weight will be the limiting factor. Heaviest 5th wheel in the brochure is 14,000 GVWR and that means a pin weight of about 2800 to 3000 lb which is, I suspect, just about the limit of what the truck will carry on the hitch. May not be overloaded but will be fully loaded.

He actually stated 30 ft but was probably going by the model number. the only model number 30 is the 30RKS with a 12,500 gross weight and he certainly would not have issues with that. Personally I would have wanted a diesel (rust free) at almost all cost. Even the older ones will get you there better than gas.

Charles
The max towing cap for that year model lists 12,000#, and that is with the 8100 Vortec or Duramax diesel-equipped models. Way too close to trying to squeeze every last pound out of capacity for my comfort.

2002 Chevrolet Silverado 2500HD​

Tire size: LT245/75R16
Engine: 6.0 L V8, 6.6 L V8 diesel, 8.1 L V8
Payload: 3,177 to 4,074 lbs
Transmission: 4 & 5-speed automatic, 5 & 6-speed manual
Curb weight: 5,126 to 6,023 lbs
Towing capacity: 12,000 lbs
 
Of course,we are just guessing at this point, as the OP hasn't given enough info to gather accurate info.

I looked at the 2002 Chevrolet Silverado sales brochure and on page 10 of 29, right hand panel, it lists detailed info on 2500HD and 3500 fifth wheel towing. Trailer king pin weight for a 2500HD is a max of 3000 lbs not to exceed the vehicle RAWR or the GVWR. Tow capacities for manual and automatic are the same and dependent on cab type, engine type and rear axle ratio.

A 6.0L V8 is a max of 10,00 to 10,500 depending on the cab design and bed length.

A 8.1L V8 is 13,500 to 14,300 again depending on the cab and bed, with a 3.73 rear axle ratio.
The 8.1L with a 4.10 rear axle, the 5th wheel capacities jump to 15,500 up to 16,300 lbs. These are 5th wheel specific numbers, different tow capacities are given for ball hitch trailering. The 3.73 axle requires an automatic transmission and of course the weights given are for base models. Start adding options and capacities drop.

Basically if the OP has a 6.0L engine, he has a problem, if it has the 8.1L, he is good.

Edit: forgot to mention, on both GM/Chev trucks and Dodge/RAM trucks, the rear axle ratio can be found on a sticker located on the inside of the glove box door.

I had a co-worker who sought out and bought a 2005 Surburban 2500 with the 8.1L (in the 'burb they got the 4L80 (or 4L90 cannot remember which) and not the Allison. The 'burb had a 4.10 axle and he towed a car trailer with a mid sized late '60's Plymouth from his folks place in Indiana to Atlanta and said you almost could not feel the trailer behind it.

Charles
 
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