Best TT or 5th wheel for 6 months snowbirding.

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shelley354

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Aug 13, 2018
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13
Hi there

Are there certain brands of TT or 5th wheels, which one would recommend over another for long distance travel over 6 months snowbirding? For example we were looking at a Forest River brand but the salesman said the frame was aluminum, versus a Keystone Outback which had a steel frame......so do we take it from the salesman that the Keystone is more what we should be looking for?

Thanks
 

shelley354

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Aug 13, 2018
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thanks for the reply- I was thinking he perhaps meant the level of how much the trailer flexes when going along, if its a bumpy ride.
 

ChasA

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Mar 21, 2009
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Well, the frame would be a major consideration for me. Many trailers use 2x2 wooden studs for framing. I would not have a trailer with a wood frame. With a choice between steel vs aluminum, i would prefer aluminum because it's lighter, all other things being equal (floor plan, etc.). And aluminum can be stronger than steel in well engineered shapes.
 

kdbgoat

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There's a lot of old trailers with wood frames that are still doing fine. The key for any RV is doing inspections and maintenance diligently.
 

Krow

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Oct 19, 2014
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Seen a lot of flatbed aluminum trailers carrying a lot more load than I'll ever have to.
 

kdbgoat

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shelley354 said:
Hi there

Are there certain brands of TT or 5th wheels, which one would recommend over another for long distance travel over 6 months snowbirding? For example we were looking at a Forest River brand but the salesman said the frame was aluminum, versus a Keystone Outback which had a steel frame......so do we take it from the salesman that the Keystone is more what we should be looking for?

Thanks

The chassis frame on both are steel, and the frame of the "house" on both are welded aluminum. A quick look at the manufacturer's websites will show you that.
I'm sure you've heard this before, but do you know how to tell a salesperson is lying?

Their lips are moving. Most RV salespeople will tell you anything you want to hear to make a sale, including your 1/2 ton pickup can pull that Grand Design Solitude.
 

Wi1dBill

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Jun 20, 2013
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425
 
As stated before floor plan is important.  For the DW and I a front bath and then a half bath works the best for us. Real nice if you have overnight guests.
I would strongly suggest changing the cheapo tires that come with a new unit.  Also if you're planning to pull it back and forth and putting a lot of miles on it, upgrade the suspension to something like MORryde.
A Washer and dryer should be considered.  When the DW started using ours, she wasn't trilled, then she figured that she could throw a load in, leave and do something else. Come back later switch the clothes to the dryer and go do other things like play pickle ball.

Wi1dBi11   
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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At our Silver Springs FL home
Any of the higher end (better quality) units should be fine.  The cheaper the RV, the more they skimp on construction and materials.  Both Forest River and Keystone are full-line RV manufacturers, from the very low end to the high.  High end models get more luxury, but that's also where they provide better materials (chassis, wall construction, insulation, flooring, plumbing & electrical).  One of the challenges is to distinguish between a gussied-up low end model (more trim) and the models that are a step up in construction quality.

Only the lowest priced RVs use the old-style  "stick & tin" construction, with thin wood studs and corrugated metal skin.  Just about any fiberglass (aka filon) skinned RV will have metal wall studs. Same for smooth-skinned metal (flat, riveted aluminum).  Look on the manufacturer website for construction info. If they don't provide any, that's not a good sign.

The rest of the choice is all about floor plan (layout). It ha to have the facilities and space necessary to make you comfortable over a several month period. A cramped bath, awkward tv viewing angle or small fridge gets to be a real bummer after a few weeks. Make sure your wants and needs are adequately addressed. We all have different things that are important to us, so figure out what you need to be comfortable.
 

shelley354

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Aug 13, 2018
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13
Thanks to everyone who has taken the time to respond- I will review and discuss with the hubby!
 
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