Bicycle Repair

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Steve CDN

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I will be rebuilding and restoring a mountain bike I recently acquired.  In looking at wheelsets, I noticed that some rear wheels are made for a cassette as opposed to a freewheel.  What's a cassette?

The bicycle I got is a soft tail...a rear suspension.  I've been looking at the bicycle parts sites for the coil spring used in the rear suspension but can't find them.  Do they have a special name I should be looking for or are they not usually replaced?
 

Steve CDN

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Thank you for the great resource, Pauline!  I'll be checking it frequently.  So now I know that I've got an ordinary freewheel.  I'll be stripping down the frame,  for repainting, then will repair, upgrade or replace components as a project of love.  I am still puzzled by the coil spring for the soft tail.  Though I can probably refurbish the existing one, I see some interesting variations on various production bikes, which makes me think they should be available as a separate item.
 

pauline

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Apr 6, 2006
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For the coil spring
Pros:?
Some of the soft tails out there have the best components and geometry that allows the rider to have a pleasant experience. For the most part they are simply more comfortable than a hard tail. They can take the abuse of the trail, you can take big jumps, drops and rock beds with ease. The learning curve in mtn biking is much easier on a soft tail. A newbie can feel comfortable in taking the most difficult course.

Cons:
The first thing that comes to mind is that soft tail bikes are way more expensive than a hard tails.
The soft tail has more moving parts to go wrong. Pivot points, bearings and rear shocks can easily wear out causing some expensive repairs. These bikes are also much heavier. The rear suspension arms and rear shock adds up. Some soft tail bikes can weigh from 35-45lbs. It all depends on what kind of parts you have on it.

 

Steve CDN

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They can take the abuse of the trail, you can take big jumps, drops and rock beds with ease

Oh boy!!  I am looking forward to making those big jumps :D 8)

The bike I'll be restoring is a steel frame klunker, but after riding it, I fell in love with it and feel it deserves a second chance.  I have most of the parts I need from other restoration projects, except for the wheelset.  The originals are badly rusted, so I'll be watching for a set of 26" alloy wheels.  Not being in a hurry is my best advantage, and I'll start with stripping the frame for repainting.  The d?railleurs are fine, I have extra shifters and cables, and all the bearings are OK.  I have a new handlebar and stem, so all I need is the wheels.

If I can find another coil spring for the rear end, I'll replace it, and if not, I can refinish the one that's there.

Big mountains of Florida...here I come ;D ;D
 

Steve CDN

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I've rebuilt and or modified about ten bikes.  Bicycles are such wonderful creations that are relatively easy to modify to improve one's experience with one's steed, that I find it satisfying. 
 

sulexer

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Oct 31, 2018
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Hong Kong
Steve said:
I will be rebuilding and restoring a mountain bike I recently acquired.  In looking at wheelsets, I noticed that some rear wheels are made for a cassette as opposed to a freewheel.  What's a cassette?

The bicycle I got is a soft tail...a rear suspension.  I've been looking at the bicycle parts sites for the coil spring used in the rear suspension but can't find them.  Do they have a special name I should be looking for or are they not usually replaced?
A bicycle cassette is the cluster of sprockets located on rear hub of your bike, slotting onto freehub body and held firmly in place with a cassette lockring.
 
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