Buying a used class-C for snow country

The friendliest place on the web for anyone with an RV or an interest in RVing!
If you have answers, please help by responding to the unanswered posts.

Erik F

New member
Joined
Sep 28, 2005
Posts
1
Hello all.? I'm new to these forums, but since I'm looking into buying an RV, I wanted to make sure to do my homework and this seemed like a good place to start.

I'm looking at buying my first RV and am looking at getting something used and less than 25 feet.? I've looked into floorplans, and narrowed it down to a rear-bed with overhead sleeping cab as well.? The biggest concern I have remaining is how well an RV (a used RV in particular) will perform in snow country and how much money I'll have to put into it to make it usable.? Some of what worries me: freezing water tanks, freezing grey water, freezing sewage, getting too cold and any required extra insulation, snow pile-up on the roof, extra chain requirements or even unsafe driving in snowy conditions, etc.

The other question I have is if anybody has any experience overnighting at ski resorts?? Are most resorts ok with people staying in their lots or am I going to have to plan on finding campgrounds that are open during the winter months?

Any additional thoughts or insight is appreciated.? Thanks in advance,

Erik
 

Jeannine

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 7, 2005
Posts
482
Erik F said:
  The biggest concern I have remaining is how well an RV (a used RV in particular) will perform in snow country and how much money I'll have to put into it to make it usable.  Some of what worries me: freezing water tanks, freezing grey water, freezing sewage, getting too cold and any required extra insulation, snow pile-up on the roof, extra chain requirements or even unsafe driving in snowy conditions, etc.

The other question I have is if anybody has any experience overnighting at ski resorts?  Are most resorts ok with people staying in their lots or am I going to have to plan on finding campgrounds that are open during the winter months?

Hi Erik,

My husband and I sometimes spend our winters in ski areas in our 5W trailer.

To answer your easiest question first.... Most ski resorts do not let you park in their lots overnight.  A few exceptions I know about:  Vail, Copper, and Grand Targhee.  Grand Targhee even has electrical hookups available.  Many RV parks at or near ski areas close in the winter.

Freezing water tanks, etc. can be a problem.  Some trailers (and maybe other RVs) have the tanks exposed to the elements, others have them in an enclosed compartment.  Some RVs have heated compartments.  You can put heating pads on the tanks and heat tape on the water lines, but they require electricity and can put a drain on your batteries.  Running the heater  if you don't have an electrical hookup can run down the batteries really fast.  We avoid the problem of freezing water hoses by filling our water tank during the day when it (hopefully) is above freezing.

Welcome to the forum.  Let me know if you have other questions.

Jeannine

 

beekay

Member
Joined
Nov 16, 2005
Posts
23
Location
Conifer, Colorado
I went through this same thing last year.  I want to use my rig year round, especially in the snowy seasons.  Winter park does allow you to park in a lot, its further away than the main lots, but still a good deal (free).  we parked slope side last year in the spring and got harrassed each night by someone different, but they all let us stay the night.

your concerns are the main ones.  freezing tanks.  many RV's have a cold weather package to accomodate for this issue; making the RV a 3+ season vehicle.  you will still deal with condensation problems as well as cold walls because most of these rigs are not meant for full on winter use.

Bigfoot on the other hand is a 4 season RV.  fibercore insullation, thermal pane windows, heated tanks, mud/snow tires, 4wd option.  i have a 29' with a slide (29sl model).  Love it to death.  more expensive than most 2 and 3 season RV's you will find out there but you can easily see and feel the difference.  Little or no condensation inside the rig and the walls are not cold like the minnie whinnie we rented the year before and used similar sub 30 degree conditions.

used ones go for just a few points less than brand new ones (good resale) and you will not find many of them in the aftermarket (high demand).

If you are planning to boon dock in the winter, make sure you have emergency battery set up so you can jump the rig in case you kill the battery at night! 

bk
 
Top Bottom