Can I plug my 50amp cord from my class A into a dryer outlet?

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DonTom

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Redundancy is a system that is completely separate and is immune to single point failures.
That depends on who you ask. Where I used to work, that is what it was called yet they both couldn't be on at the same time.

My dictionary says redundant means "more than is needed".

-Don- Crescent City, CA
 

Lou Schneider

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When I was taking care of FM radio station transmitters I'd usually configure them so one transmitter was connected to the main antenna and the backup transmitter was connected to the backup antenna, ready to go with separate audio paths from the studio to each one.

The standing instructions to the DJs was in the rare event something happened to the air signal, shut off the transmitter that was on the air and start the other one. Then call me. The backup transmitter was usually older and sometimes had less power than the main, but this would quickly get them back on the air via a fully redundant path rather than wasting precious time trying to troubleshoot the problem and I'd figure out what went wrong when I got to the site.
 

Pedro Dog

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Definitions from Oxford Languages

  • Engineering
    the inclusion of extra components which are not strictly necessary to functioning, in case of failure in other components.
    "a high degree of redundancy is built into the machinery installation"
 

Ex-Calif

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That depends on who you ask. Where I used to work, that is what it was called yet they both couldn't be on at the same time.

My dictionary says redundant means "more than is needed".

-Don- Crescent City, CA

As usual you can be argumentative all you want.

In the systems safety and redundancy world redundant means two independent systems.

There's a big difference between a dictionary definition and a non-redundant system for which the failure consequence is death as it is in aerospace.

In a forum while chatting casually one can never really bring their entire experience to bear as it gets really detailed and very boring.

It is also frustrating when a person one is conversing with challenges "everything." You joke a lot about "straightening out" the standards people on this topic or that but in reality it offends (a little) those who spent a lifetime accumulating knowledge and experience knowing that the rules and standards are based on the deaths of a lot of people.

I worked in aerospace and here is the FAA definition of redundancy.

1660235844632.png

That means for example in the case of hydro-electric landing gear you have a manual cranking system or a gravity drop system or something.

But that just opens up a plethora of related items and concerns. If you want to learn about this stuff I suggest you read the whole FAA document on the subject. There is an entre section on definitions.


It is interesting to look at the table on page 23. Most all of us had this table tacked to a wall in our cube. Read note 3 if you would. Basically that says no single point failure of any of the hundreds and hundreds of systems on an airplane can cause a catastrophic loss.

And just for fun look at the last box on the right. Allowable probabilities for a system failure in larger transport aircraft are less than 10 to the 9th power.

Aviation is not just covered by "good ideas." It is regulated by Federal Law - i.e. Federal Aviation Regulations in which busting them can result in criminal penalties - like fines & jail time.

An FAR is a "what" you must do to be legal. An Advisory Circular is not regulatory but is the "how" of doing a lot of FARs. If you don't follow an advisory circular you won't go to jail... Unless the airplane crashes and you don't have a pretty darn good reason for not following the Advisory Circular.

I am not picking on you and should probably keep my mouth shut on this but I needed to get it off my chest.

We are talking RVs for Pete's sake and really I have no skin in the game if someone wires a plug wrong and kills themselves. I also shouldn't really care about whether anyone understands system safety or not. I mean, really, really, really. The internet is not the place to get advice on a whole range of things with medical and legal advice probably at the top of the list - LOL...

I will go back to sleep now.
 

DonTom

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As usual you can be argumentative all you want.
It was the term used where I worked for exactly what I described. I didn't come up with the term, so you will have to blame somebody else if they are using the term incorrectly.

I couldn't care less either way.

-Don- Crescent CIty, CA
 

Ex-Calif

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It was the term used where I worked for exactly what I described. I didn't come up with the term, so you will have to blame somebody else if they are using the term incorrectly.

I couldn't care less either way.

-Don- Crescent CIty, CA

More passive-aggressiveness - You posted the quote and IMO you should own it and its meaning if you are going to use it.

Copping out and saying basically, "I repeated this stuff to make my point but if it's wrong it's not my fault" is a foul ball.

Disinformation can really matter. If you are going to "post as an expert" in areas I think it's important to do your due diligence and not bail on a position if, "Well it's someone else's opinion, anyway. It's not mine."

Having gotten out of bed on both sides over the years I haven't found the world to be any less annoying regardless - LOL...

By the way - I am not about "winning" or "being to blame" or not being to blame. It's usually about finding the best answers and solutions to people's questions.
 

DonTom

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When I was taking care of FM radio station transmitters I'd usually configure them so one transmitter was connected to the main antenna and the backup transmitter was connected to the backup antenna,
We had too many low-band bases stations and no room for more antennas at that time (1980's). They still used the low band as backup as it is less likely to fail than the entire new trunking system is to knock everybody off the air at once. Even with the failsoft and site-trunking, etc, it has happened in just about every city that has a large trunking system.

Motorola SmartNet and another smaller separate trunking system in SF that DPW mostly uses, for many years until I retired. Still has the four backup lowband bases stations (8 total, including the "redundancy".

But the cops wanted to keep the low band in case things went seriously wrong. And they have, but usually not for long.

The way it was when I retired in 2012. I have no idea what they have these days.

-Don- Crescent City, CA
 

SeilerBird

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St Cloud Florida USA
I have been complaining here about nothing! I totally forgot I do NOT have to unplug my electric motorcycle to do anything at all on the mickey-mouse RV-30 outlet here.

I just took a shower and didn't want to go outside to unplug my charging bike to dry my hair. I have been riding the bike most of the day and used up 60% SOC.

So I used my brain for a change, instead! o_O

I somehow forgot about my inverter on my 300 AH battery! I didn't think about it just because I am not boondocked. I just dried my hair with my hair drier from my inverter. The one I added.

I watched my Victron as I dried my hair.

At 12V lith battery:

1,574 watts.
127.20 amps.

Voltage drop of 1.0 volt.

Rest voltage was 13.22 volts
12.22 under the load above.

The hair drier says it is rated at 1875 watts. But my 1,574- 12VDC watts worked very well for hair drying.

My MW oven is 1550 watts. So there will be no problem there either.

So I have no need for the 50 amp (or hair drier outlet) here.

Somehow, battery recovered to 13.29 volts in a few seconds after the load was removed. Even more than the 13.22 I started with, says my Victron SmartShunt.

-Don- Crescent City, CA
What exactly is a hair drier? :eek:
 

Tom

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Folks, this thread has turned personal. Please address the issue(s), not the person. Thanks.
 

Tom

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In Australia, is the secondary house transformer voltage 240 VAC (like in the USA) or is it 480 VAC? If 480 VAC, do they use it for anything?

-Don- Crescent City, VA
I haven't confirmed this, but I suspect that Australia follows the UK, i.e. 3 phase 415V, center tapped "star" (wye) transformer secondary. Any phase to neutral = 240V.

One nit - several countries agreed to standardize on 230V +/- 23V, replacing prior individual country's 220V, 230V or 240V. Also, Australia and the UK domestic power is 50Hz, not 60Hz.
 

DonTom

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3 phase 415V, center tapped "star"
Too bad we didn't also start out that way.

Do they find much use for the 415V, other than industrial stuff?

I noticed here in the USA the EV fast chargers use something like that, 3-phase AC going in somewhere around that voltage, but I think it was 480 VAC 3-phase going in. I usually read the labels on the EV charge stations.

-Don- Crescent CIty, CA
 

Tom

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Too bad we didn't also start out that way.

Do they find much use for the 415V, other than industrial stuff?

I noticed here in the USA the EV fast chargers use something like that, 3-phase AC going in somewhere around that voltage, but I think it was 480 VAC 3-phase going in. I usually read the labels on the EV charge stations.

-Don- Crescent CIty, CA
I don't know about Australia, but the UK did have 415V equipment, although little in domestic use. Just think of it as 3 separate phases, with homes distributed among them.

Edit: For the purpose of this discussion, think of 415V as a simple calculation:
240V x root3 = 415V.​
 
Last edited:

Tom

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I too would be impressed if I (or anybody) could do that without a calculator! No, I cheated with my Win 11 calculator.

-Don- Crescent City, CA
There was a time I could have done it in my head, almost instantaneously, but those days are long gone.
Back in the day, not only did we not have PCs, we didn't have too many instruments that could measure to that many significant digits. But, since the tolerance was something like +/-20V, nobody cared.
 

Lou Schneider

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There was a time I could have done it in my head, almost instantaneously, but those days are long gone.
Back in the day, not only did we not have PCs, we didn't have too many instruments that could measure to that many significant digits. But, since the tolerance was something like +/-20V, nobody cared.
That's like the tolerances on electrolytic capacitors being something like -50% to +100% of the nominal value.
 
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