Can I tow this comfortably

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ClayBass

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Jan 13, 2006
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I am finding the information in here very helpful.  This question is probably already been answered but I figured I would ask it specific.
I have a 2004 F150 supercrew with a 5.4 and a 3:55 rear.  The specs are 8200 towing.  Would a 6000 gvrw be an uncomfortable pull.  I'm pulling in the mountains a fair bit.  There is a good deal on a 22'.  It's unfortunate cause we'd be happy with 19 but tis is the deal.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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I would not have expected an F150 with 5.4 and 3.55 axle to be rated as quite high as 8200 lbs, but the information I see online indicates that is the right ballpark and that it really can do it. However, you must remember to subtract whatever passengers and gear you carry in the truck from the max tow rating.

Given the 8200 lbs, I would say that a 6000 lb trailer should be a comfortable tow, even in the western mountains. As a rule of thumb we figure about 15% LESS than the max for mountainous towing.  That 3.55 axle won't be doing you any favors on long climbs, though, so be prepared for relatively low top speeds on grades.

Let us know how it goes when you get it.  Fedback on actual performance helps us help others like yourself.
 

Carl L

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Given the 8200 lbs, I would say that a 6000 lb trailer should be a comfortable tow, even in the western mountains.

I agree.  I was as surprised as you by the rating but the 2006 figures support that for the F150 with the 3.55.  Evidently given the range of vehicles in the F series, Ford is serious about marketing a line of trucks and vans that can tow and take payload.  Much more so than GMC.  Given what the Japanese have done and are doing in the passenger car lines, Ford is wise.
 

ClayBass

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Thanks for the info.  Now would the weight of my passengers come off of the tow rate or off of the vehicle GVW.  My truck itself is rate to 7200 lbs while I am rated to tow 8200 lbs.  I just don't want to be that guy holding up traffic for 3 miles cause I needed a bigger trailer then truck.  You know that guy don't you?  The unit is a springdale lite model 1998 21.5 feet.  I guess a 1/2 should be okay with that.  By the way.  I found this chart that a dealer had on his web site that has the ratings back a few years with every possible vehicle made.  Mine was deliniated right down to my body style, w/b, 4wd, engine and rear end.  It's in a pdf format.  I can e-mail to anyone interested or tell you the web site.  There must have been 100 F150's.
 

Carl L

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Now would the weight of my passengers come off of the tow rate or off of the vehicle GVW

The tow vehicle GCVWR.    Of course the tow rating is really the GCVWR minus the weight of the tow vehicle and its base loading (fluids and driver).
 

Keith from NS

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Nov 23, 2005
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Hi Claybass,
We are in the process of purchasing a truck (probably a few years older) for our trailer.  You mentioned a chart that your dealer had with truck information for several models, dating back a few years.  I would appreciate it if you would send it to me.  My email address is: [email protected]
Thanks very much!!
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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Now would the weight of my passengers come off of the tow rate or off of the vehicle GVW.

Actually it comes off ALL of those.  Any weight carried by the truck is included in the truck's  GVW (Gross Vehicle Weight, so must be within the GVWR. Since the truck GVW is part of the Gross Combined Weight, it must be contained by the GCWR as well.  And the "maximum tow rating" quoted in the brochures is essentially the GCWR minus the EMPTY truck weight, any weight added to the truck reduces the capacity left for a trailer.

They usually quote the truck's empty weight with a full fuel tank and a 150 lb driver. If you weigh more than that, you need to subtract that as well.

Note that none of these numbers imply anything about performance. There is no statement expressed or implied that you will enjoy "good" performance by staying within that envelope. But obviously, the further below it you are, the better off you will be.  On hills your problem is going to be transmission gearing - you don't have enough gears to apply the available power efficiently. You will keep up with car traffic only if you are willing to rev the engine fairly high, something most people are reluctant to do. It's noisy, scary sounding and probably makes the temperature gauge rise as well.  You will want to ease up on the accelerator and that is when you will wish you had a bigger engine, higher ratio rear axle, 5 or 6 speed transmission and the other features of a "big truck".
 
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