Can our truck tow the travel trailer we are looking to buy?

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ngoldsmith

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Jul 21, 2018
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We have a 2010 Chevy Silverado Z71off Road (it is not a 4 wheel drive) Texas Edition. The travel trailer we are wanting is 8500 lbs. Can our truck pull it?  Looking for some good advise.
 

darsben

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Central NY in summer beautiful Casa Grande AZ in w
It looks like you have about 1600 pounds cargo capacity. That 8500 pound trailer will weigh about 10,000 lbs loaded the hitch weight will be about  1000 to 1400 lbs  (10-15% of trailer weight goes to hitch) leaving you very little capacity for people.  So it is a no go to me on a 9 year old truck.
The tow rating is that high so a salesman will try to show you that number but cargo capacity is the controlling factor
 

ngoldsmith

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Jul 21, 2018
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Thank you for your advise. On a normal basis it is only myself and my husband in tow but have kids and grandkids that join us. Right now we will only be ?weekend warriors??
 

SpencerPJ

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Nov 1, 2017
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Midwest
I'm pretty sure you know the answer to your question.

NO WAY would I pull that trailer with your truck, especially with grand-kids aboard.  You will be near or past every limit of the truck.
 

grashley

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Western Kentucky
Welcome to the Forum!

Truck salesmen love to tout the "Max Tow" for their trucks, but the number they quote is for a base trim regular cab 2WD, NOT YOUR TRUCK!  That number includes a full fuel tank, 2 passengers at 150# each, and NOTHING ELSE!    The numbers off the internet will be for your configuration, but it is still base trim, full gas tank and 2 passengers ONLY.  The footnote on the chart will say the weight of all options and cargo above the two passengers must be subtracted from the max tow.

Trailer salesmen tout the dry wt of the camper, which is hogwash.  Nobody goes camping in an empty camper!  When loaded to camp, the weight will be much closer to the trailer GVWR.

Truck sales will tell you the truck you want can pull any camper you want.  Trailer sales will tell you your truck can tow any camper on the lot.  THEY BOTH LIE!!

Look for a yellow banner placard on the driver door latch post which states the max weight of passengers and cargo shall not exceed xxxx pounds.  That is the payload for YOUR truck.  from the Payload, subtract the weight of all passengers, car seats, games, snacks and toys carried in the truck.  Subtract another 80 lbs for a WD hitch.  What is left is the max hitch weight the truck can handle.  Multiply by 10 to get the absolute heaviest camper (GVWR) you can tow, assuming 10% hitch wt.  For a 12.5% hitch wt., multiply remaining payload by 8.
 

steveblonde

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Jan 8, 2015
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calgary alberta
grashley said:
Welcome to the Forum!

Truck salesmen love to tout the "Max Tow" for their trucks, but the number they quote is for a base trim regular cab 2WD, NOT YOUR TRUCK!  That number includes a full fuel tank, 2 passengers at 150# each, and NOTHING ELSE!    The numbers off the internet will be for your configuration, but it is still base trim, full gas tank and 2 passengers ONLY.  The footnote on the chart will say the weight of all options and cargo above the two passengers must be subtracted from the max tow.

Trailer salesmen tout the dry wt of the camper, which is hogwash.  Nobody goes camping in an empty camper!  When loaded to camp, the weight will be much closer to the trailer GVWR.

Truck sales will tell you the truck you want can pull any camper you want.  Trailer sales will tell you your truck can tow any camper on the lot.  THEY BOTH LIE!!

Look for a yellow banner placard on the driver door latch post which states the max weight of passengers and cargo shall not exceed xxxx pounds.  That is the payload for YOUR truck.  from the Payload, subtract the weight of all passengers, car seats, games, snacks and toys carried in the truck.  Subtract another 80 lbs for a WD hitch.  What is left is the max hitch weight the truck can handle.  Multiply by 10 to get the absolute heaviest camper (GVWR) you can tow, assuming 10% hitch wt.  For a 12.5% hitch wt., multiply remaining payload

by 8.


100% correct Gordon
 
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